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News and Notes
from the Field

Posts Filtered by Month - June 2017 |
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June 18, 2017
Continued New Arrivals
Expected Harvest
By Derek McGeehan
Harvest #6 (Week B) should include cabbage, chard, butterhead lettuce, mini lettuces, romaine lettuce, cabbage, beets, garlic scapes, scallions, hakurei turnips, kohlrabi, summer squash, dill, cilantro, parsley, basil, endive, escarole, radicchio, kale, and Italian dandelion. Some items will be a choice. U-pick should include peas and herbs and may include raspberries.
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June 18, 2017
Greens and peas
How I Enjoyed My Harvest
By Linda Dansbury
It begins: cucumbers and summer squash have begun and amounts distributed will steadily grow until you're receiving a very ample supply. If you don't see any in your share this week be patient - they'll be there very soon!
This past week was pretty busy with not a huge amount of cooking going on, but I did enjoy my harvest. For your information, I am a medium share - I was a full share member for years and I also grow a lot of my own veggies. Due to a shrinking household and my parents now living in a place where they go to a dining room for dinner means that I couldn't keep up. I tell you this in case I am not talking enough about items that you are interested in. Please email me at lindadansbury@comcast.net with recipes to share to fellow members or questions you have about any of the veggies we receive. Please put Anchor Run in the subject line so I can find your email.
Turnips, kohlrabi - every day I take my lunch and alongside my sandwich I take what I call bunny food. Turnips and kohlrabi are yummy as part of my bunny food bag! In full disclosure, last week I found 2 watermelon radishes in my crisper drawer from last fall and I thinly sliced them and added to my bunny food - they were still delicious!
Peas - I made a quick and easy stir fry. First I stir fried minced ginger in peanut oil until fragrant - about a minute. I added the peas and kept them moving in the wok (you can use a large non-stick pan). I then quickly added a chopped hot pepper from last year's harvest that was in my freezer, but red pepper flakes would be good too. I then added chopped garlic scapes, followed by a bit of sesame oil and soy sauce. I served it alongside fish that I steamed with ginger, scallions and garlic chives from my garden. Topped all with chopped cilantro.
Mixed greens - dandelion, Anchor Run custom mix, mizuna - sauteed a pile of greens with a little onion, garlic scapes and red pepper flakes - think method for broccoli raab. I topped it with grilled sausages from Ledamete Grass.
Kale and other greens - made a couple of smoothies with yogurt and frozen fruit.
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June 18, 2017
Pre-Order from Ledamete Grass Farm!
Other News
Ledamete Grass Market at Anchor Run Farm!
Order Online Today!
Ledamete Grass Farm will be delivering PRE-ORDERS to Anchor Run Farm for pick up on Thursday, June 29th! Can't make it the 29th? Don't worry, your order will be held in Anchor Run's freezers for up to two weeks until you can retrieve it.
*PRE-ORDERS will be bagged/name-tagged and left in the freezer for self-service pick up.
Order Your Pastured Meats Today- Deadline Midnight June 21st!
100% Grassfed Beef- spicy sticks, sweet sticks, BBQ sticks, Teriyaki sticks, hog dogs, ground beef, burgers, steaks, London Broil, brisket and more!
Pastured Chicken- bone-in breasts, boneless breasts, drumsticks, wings, and thighs
PRE-ORDERS ONLY!!
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June 18, 2017
Workshifts Scheduled for Week of 6/18/17
Other News
Workshifts this week:
Wednesday 6/21 10am-12noon
Wednesday 6/21 6-8pm
Friday 6/23 10am-12noon
Sunday 6/25 8-10am
Workshift sign-up instructions may be found here.
Thank you!
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June 18, 2017
Grilled Greens?
Other News
By Linda Dansbury
You may still be in the pick up room or at home saying "what am I going to do with all of these greens?" Looking at the long list that Derek sends me each week gets me thinking ahead of time on what to do with things so that I can offer help to you.
This past week and coming week both had beautiful heads of romaine and we may receive radicchio this coming week. One of our favorite ways to eat both of these is to grill them - yes, grill your greens!
Cut both of them into quarters, keeping the cores in tact so that they stay together. Any leaves that fall off can be added to any salads. Brush with olive oil. Place on grill and do not walk away! Just lightly char the quarters on the cut sides. When lightly charred, take off the grill. For the radicchio, I drizzle lightly with a nice olive oil and a tiny bit of balsamic vinegar and salt and pepper. The romaine could be treated the same way, but I typically make it into a Caesar salad. Instead of making my own dressing, I usually have a jar of OPA Caesar in the fridge. It is Greek yogurt based - you can jazz it up with added garlic, olive oil and parm cheese if you like.
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June 18, 2017
Introducing Pat and Joe
Other News
Over the next few weeks we'll introduce individual members of the crew to the Anchor Run CSA community. For more information check out our Farmer Bio page. Hannah and John were introduced last week.
Patrick McGowan is looking forward to being an assistant farmer this season at Anchor Run farm. His family has been a CSA member for some years, during which time Pat has been introduced to the CSA concept and working in the fields. He's hoping the experience he gains here, along with his past landscaping job and love of growing, will help him with the related studies he plans to pursue at Delaware Valley University.
Pat is a resident of Churchville and a 2015 graduate of Council Rock South. He is also the builder of the dry-stack stone walls outside of the pick up room in the new garden area.
Joe Phillipps is excited to be a part of Anchor Run. Having been a member of the CSA for several years, he is finally able to try his hand at farm work, something that interested him since he was a little kid helping his mom in her garden. He has a passion for trying new things and constantly reminds himself that anything is worth exploring for the experience. His love of the outdoors has led him to join the soccer team in high school, jog regularly throughout Newtown, lifeguard at Sesame Place, and, more recently, plan to attend University in Wyoming, where he hopes to learn all about life in the west, including back country survival and horsemanship, while pursuing a degree in Liberal Arts.
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June 11, 2017
2017 Farm Crew
Notes From The Field
By Derek McGeehan
The 2017 Anchor Run CSA farm field crew smiling after transplanting beans in the warm rain: Lauren, Hannah, Pat, Joe, and John
Over the next few weeks we'll introduce individual members of the crew to the Anchor Run CSA community. For more information check out our Farmer Bio page.
Field manager and crew leader Hannah Stocker joined the team of growers at Anchor Run Farm in the winter of 2016. She and her husband, Jason, along with their dog, Honey, live on site in the White Pine Ranch. They are so happy to call Anchor Run their home, and they hope to be a part of the farm for years to come.
Hannah first cultivated her love of plants and fresh food in her grandfather's and mother's gardens at her childhood home in Newtown borough. Inspired by these memories, she explored her interest in the natural world by taking jobs doing landscaping and working at a perennial plant nursery and even a flower shop. Her passion for things that grow also lead her to pursue a degree in Horticulture. Like Derek and Dana, after acquiring her Bachelor of Science, she ventured to the Washington D.C. area. While there she became immersed in Organic CSA farming at Clagett Farm, operated by the Chesapeake Bay Foundation. After more than 3 years of honing her farming skills at Clagett, she decided to return to her roots and help feed the community she loves in Bucks County.
Hannah's role as field manager allows her to work closely with Dana and Derek and experience the scope of challenging and humbling tasks that are required to keep the farm running. As Derek once said, she is a wearer of many hats, requiring her to oversee everything from the seasonal staff to marketing to barn organization! Each day Hannah falls more in love with life here on the farm, and she is so thankful to the amazing community that allows Anchor Run to be so successful!
Assistant Farmer John Conner is a Bucks County native, heralding from down the road in Newtown. He first learned of Anchor Run CSA from his sister and field manager, Hannah. John graduated Council Rock High School North in 2012 and The Pennsylvania State University in 2016 with a Bachelors of Arts in English. Besides working at Anchor Run, he is currently undergoing discernment for a vocation to the priesthood in the Episcopal Diocese of Pennsylvania. He is an avid reader, runner, and Dungeon Master and is excited to be helping the members of his community by providing them with fresh food.
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June 11, 2017
Big beautiful beets and...
Expected Harvest
By Derek McGeehan
Harvest #5 (Week A) should include beets, cabbage, hakurei turnips, kohlrabi, butterhead lettuce, mini lettuces, romaine lettuce, endive, escarole, garlic scapes, chives, dill, cilantro, parsley, kale, chard, Italian dandelion, and mizuna. Some items will be a choice. U-pick should include snow and snap peas, strawberries, and herbs. A brief note on the peas: Unfortunately they're slightly less plentiful this year but will remain in shares for another week or two.
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June 11, 2017
So many good things to Eat!
How I Enjoyed My Harvest
By Linda Dansbury
This past week I did cook/prepare a few things that I want to share - I also received a recipe from a member - I love hearing from you and sharing your recipes with the other members. Email me at lindadansbury@comcast.net and please put Anchor Run in the subject line of the email so I can find it.
Ann Morton sent me a recipe for Creamed Forest Kale over Wild Rice - here are her comments:
Thanks for all the great recipes and ideas in the newsletter! I've been meaning to send you this kale recipe for a while. It's my favorite and for me is an entire meal but my husband prefers it as a side dish. It's from Eat For Health (Joel Fuhrman, M.D.). Yummy!
I haven't tried it yet, but plan to - thanks Ann!
I make a greens saute/stir fry at least once per week - it's easy and I adjust flavorings to what else we are eating it with. Garlic, onion, red pepper flakes, chopped mushrooms might be one combo, or garlic, soy sauce, fish sauce, cilantro might be another combo. Sometimes I add a couple of eggs to the pan toward the end, cover the pan and let the egg cook till the whites are cooked but the yolk is still runny - an easy, healthy and delicious dinner!
Kale, green garlic, cilantro - Cook up a pot of your favorite rice (we like brown jasmine). In a large skillet or wok saute garlic, ginger and a pound of ground pork - from Ledemete Grass. Once the pork is cooked, start adding kale in which thick stems are removed and it is roughly chopped - use an entire bunch for this recipe. Once the kale is wilted, turn the heat off and stir in 2 cups of chopped fresh herbs - cilantro and basil work best I think - and a tablespoon or 2 of fish sauce. Serve over rice with your favorite hot sauce alongside (Sriracha).
Radishes, turnips, chives, mint - I made the Radish with Goat Cheese Dip for a delicious appetizer. This is so yummy!
Lettuce, arugula - I made a beautiful salad when we had company that I can't wait to make again when more of the ingredients are in season. The dressing was made ahead and consisted of buttermilk, basil lemon and a little garlic. Place greens on a large platter and then in pretty patterns place lots of different veggies, nuts and dried fruits. Top with dressing. I'll post the recipe when the basil and cherry tomatoes are available at the farm.
Enjoy the harvest!
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June 11, 2017
Wish List for the Farm
Other News
Below is an ongoing list of items the farm could use more of and you may have laying around unused and are hoping to get rid of. E-mail us (anchorruncsa@gmail.com) if you have something you'd like to drop off. Thanks!
  • Functional bikes
  • Yard and garden tools
  • Plastic bags (grocery bags)
  • Sharpies
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June 11, 2017
Beets and Scapes
Other News
By Linda Dansbury
An eastern box turtle was found on the farm on Saturday!
Two yummy newcomers to the pick up room this week are beets and scapes. As with the turnips, when you get the beets home, cut the tops off and store separate from the beets. They keep better and the nutrient profile holds better too. Beets are so delicious right now because they haven't been stored so their sugars are at their highest. Beets are delicious raw - slice thin or grate and put into salads. We also have a lot of recipes on this site - if we are lucky we will receive a lot of beets throughout the year so try several of them - one of my favorites is the Roasted Beet and Beet Green Risotto. The color is beautiful and it tastes delicious! If you like to bake, try the Chocolate Beet Cake - it is so moist and delicious. Or, simply roast the beets and make a batch of your favorite dijon vinaigrette and place the beets into the dressing - they will keep like this for days - you can take out the amount you want and snack on them, add to salads or put a few slices on a sandwich - yum!
(Garlic) scapes are the other new item - my pick up day is Thursday, so I already got the pleasure of having some of them. The scapes are the flower stalk of the garlic plant - the farmers must remove these stalks or the strength of the plant will go into the flower rather than the bulbs. Like with the green garlic, the scapes must be kept in the fridge. They keep for quite awhile, but once you try them, you will use them! Chop them up and add to any recipe that calls for garlic - BUT - don't cook them for long because the flavor does not hold under long, high heat. If I use them in some type of stir fry or saute, I add them with the greens at the end of the process. You can make them into pesto or dips - Garlic Scape and White Bean Dip is one of my favorites and the Garlic Scape Pesto is delicious too!
Enjoy!!
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June 11, 2017
"Now What!?" Workshops
Other News
The pergola honoring Jeannine Vannais is now completely complete. Thanks go out to members who helped fund the project by purchasing From Asparagus to Zucchini cookbooks!
Did you miss it? Don’t worry (Be Happy!)
The next Now What!? Workshop is scheduled for Saturday, June 24, 1–3pm!
The first of 2 Now What!? Workshops was attended by an actively engaged group of members! Kudos was given to Linda for her weekly column explaining how she uses her share. Thanks Linda! At the workshop, we discussed ways to store all of the produce we obtain as part of our share, as well as ways to add it to our diets and what to (and how to) save for the winter. I spoke about having the right tools to make the prep work easier and showed some examples. We also spent a good deal of time talking about using a dehydrator. And of course, we ate! I had 2 versions of Kale Stem pesto, a dip which used dehydrated tomatoes, Kohlrabi in a Teriyaki-Peanut Sauce and a quiche featuring produce from Weeks 3 & 4.
I anticipate the second Now What!? Workshop to be just as much fun! Please try to fit it in during this busy time of the year.
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June 4, 2017
A Week's Worth
Notes From The Field
By Derek McGeehan
Above, those are freshly hilled potatoes mixed with a volunteer stand of flowering buckwheat, which sprouted and grew this spring following last year's cover crop that went to seed during the warm autumn. By the way, properly hilled potatoes support additional growth for the tubers, since they mainly grow around and above the seed potato. Around 2 miles of potatoes were hilled yesterday, and each bed was hit twice in opposing directions, so I basically drove the tractor for 4 miles in the field on a blindingly sunny day. I did miss my misplaced sunglasses. South or to the left of the greenery are fairly aggressively hilled beds that were just planted with 3000 sweet potato slips/seedlings. Those will appreciate the anticipated moisture arriving Sunday-Monday.
The sun returned last week and we were finally able to cultivate many, many crops and transplant a multitude of new ones including edamame, lettuces, summer squash, cucumbers, as well as the aforementioned sweet potatoes. Here's a list of what was cultivated: basil, dill, cilantro, two bean plantings, flowers, lettuces, beets, and chard.
Some big upcoming jobs include pruning and trellising tomatoes, continued cultivation, harvesting of course, a lot of ground preparation for current and mid-summer plantings, as well as transplanting winter squash, cantaloupe, watermelon #2, beans #3, tomatoes #2, lettuces #11, basil #2, dill #3, cilantro #3, parsley #3, and sunflowers #2.
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June 4, 2017
Peas Please!
Expected Harvest
By Derek McGeehan
Harvest #4 (Week B) should include strawberries, kale, chard, mini lettuces, butterhead lettuce, endive, escarole, Italian dandelion, baby kale, mizuna, arugula, greens mix, kohlrabi, hakurei turnips, dill, cilantro, and chives. Some items will be a choice. U-pick should include snow peas (the flat kind), herbs, and may include strawberries.
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June 4, 2017
Green, greens, and more greens!
How I Enjoyed My Harvest
By Linda Dansbury
Look at all those ripe red strawberries!
Returning members are familiar with this article that I put together pretty much every week - it's kind of the weekly version of the "Now What" Workshops that many of you will hopefully attend. Not only do I share some of the ways I enjoy my harvest, but I also post things that you, the members, send to me about how you are enjoying your harvests.
A couple of you sent me a couple of things already - due to being quite sick last week, I haven't dug through my mail yet but will get to your emails. If you have a suggestion, recipe or just a question, please email me at lindadansbury@comcast.net and please put Anchor Run in the subject line so I can find your email.
Green garlic, greens - Chinese pepper steak - I know that this dish normally doesn't incorporate greens into it, but I added the bok choy in toward the end and it was really good this way!
Spinach - made the Spinach Salad with Warm Bacon Dressing. It made a simple, delicious meal when paired with a nice piece of salmon.
Broccoli raab, mizuna, green garlic - did simple sauteed greens with red pepper flakes - they were admittedly lovingly bitter but we ate them alongside steak and mashed potatoes, so they were really perfect as a combination.
Various Greens - we have been enjoying a variety of salads with many of the greens including arugula, lettuce, mizuna, Swiss chard.
Kale - made Kale Chips a couple of times and added some kale into a soup that I had in the freezer
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June 4, 2017
Turnips and Kohlrabi
Other News
By Linda Dansbury
Did the kids pick that quart of peas or was it a prop for the photo, picked by Dana? Well, they do know how to eat and enjoy them at least.
Turnips and kohlrabi are both very flexible veggies - both are delicious raw as well as cooked. Both also keep well in the fridge so you don't have to rush to consume them. Their uses overlap each other and they can be prepared in the same ways. The turnips do not need to be peeled and can be used in place of radishes in salads or as a snack. The mild flavor of spring kohlrabi also makes it a delicious snack - carefully peel the skin off before eating.
Cut the turnip tops off as soon as you get them home and store separately. The tops can be used in saute's, stir fries and soups/stews.
Check out recipes for slaws on this site using the kohlrabi and turnips - instead of cabbage, try mizuna, the Anchor Run custom greens mix, Swiss chard and other greens - eat them up quickly because the dressing will wilt the greens when stored overnight.
Check out the Turnip Green and White Saute as a cooked recipe. I also like to steam the turnips and then make a simple dipping sauce and serve along with dumplings for a delicious appetizer or a light dinner.
Kohlrabi and turnips both can be turned into chips/fries when baked in the oven. Check out the Kohlrabi Fries recipe on this site.
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