title title title title title title title
title title title
Site Navigation
Main Site |
Calendar |
Calendar |
News and Notes |
Veggies 202 |
Info |
Recipes |
Log In







News and Notes
from the Field

Posts Filtered by Tag - Other News |
Show Recent Posts

November 13, 2017
Late Fall and Winter Newsletters
Other News
by Dana Hunting
A heart-shaped redbud leaf nestled amongst white pine needles and brave perennial greens/edible weeds (I see some dandelion and plantain in there).
Newsletters for the Late Fall and Winter CSA seasons will most likely be distributed on Mondays instead of Sundays. Now that Monday is not a harvest and distribution day we're hoping we can take Sunday off from physical and administrative farm work and instead work on the newsletter on Monday morning. Thank you for your understanding!
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
November 13, 2017
Pick Up Information
Other News
by Dana Hunting
  • Pick up days: Wednesday 1-8pm and Saturday 11am-12noon, which you sign up for in advance.
  • Full and Medium Shares pick up weekly, Half Shares every other week (A or B).
  • Pick up begins this week for Full, Medium, and Week A Half Shares (log in to check your week).
  • During the week of Thanksgiving, pick up is on Tuesday 11/21 1-8pm to accommodate holiday traveling and planning.
  • You can temporarily switch your pick up day be notifying us prior.
  • If you miss your pick up we will contact you to reschedule.
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
November 5, 2017
Holiday Wreath Sale, Made by Farmers Hannah and Pat
Other News
by Hannah Stocker
Farmers Hannah and Pat would like to announce their holiday wreath sale!
They will be hand-making wreaths using materials from the farm and are taking orders starting today, November 5th. Hannah is a very experienced wreath maker extraordinaire!
If you have any questions contact Hannah at hannah.r.conner@gmail.com.
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
November 5, 2017
Final week of Main Season
Other News
By Linda Dansbury
It is difficult to believe that 6 months have gone by already! Thank you to fellow members who took the time to send me your ideas and recipes. You are great cooks and I have truly enjoyed the recipes and the stories behind them!
Sorrel is one of the herb choices right now and you may not be familiar with it. It is a perenniel herb loaded with vitamins A and C. It has a tart, lemony taste. A classic French recipe incorporates it in a lemony sauce (without using lemons) used with fish. Sorrel soups are part of both French and Polish cusines.
For the amount we are receiving, you could make a little batch of sauce for fish, or do what I am doing: adding a few leaves to salads - it is very refreshing, or use in combination with spinach and/or chard in any recipe. It will keep in the fridge for a little over a week.
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
November 5, 2017
Remember To Sign Up For The Late Fall CSA!
Other News
by Dana Hunting
The first round of direct seeded kale, arugula, tatsoi, and red mizuna is coming up nicely in our movable high tunnel while the second round of greens gets covered and watered to assist germination. Most of these greens will be harvested in January and February.
As of this weekend produce shares are still available for the 2017 6th Annual 6-week Late Fall CSA (we're 75% sold out).
To join, Log In to the website. Not sure if you'll enjoy local cold season produce? A Late Fall Half Share is only a 3 week, every-other-week commitment and is a great way to provide produce for your holiday meals. Where else are you going to find organic and affordable sweet potatoes, potatoes, carrots, roots, and greens that taste this good? We promise to leave you satisfied!
Please click here for more information and share specifics.
First pick up for Full, Medium, and Week A Half Shares is Wednesday November 15th 1-8pm or Saturday November 18th 11am-12noon. Week B Half Shares start on Tuesday November 21st 1-8pm or Saturday November 25th.
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
November 5, 2017
2017 Main Season Survey
Other News
by Dana Hunting
We've created a short anonymous survey that gives you the opportunity to shape your CSA by letting your farmers know your valuable opinion! Please fill it out for us so that we can better serve you, our CSA members.
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
November 5, 2017
Workshifts Scheduled for Week of 11/5/17
Other News
by Dana Hunting
Fall and winter lettuce mix transplanted into greenhouse Friday morning with help from CSA members during workshift.
Still owe work hours?
If you still need to work your pledged hours please consider signing up for a workshift very soon! Your opportunity to work will be over in a week or two (weather/jobs depending). We still have to plant and mulch the 2018 garlic and will need member help with that (exact date to be determined but we'll probably embark on it this week).
If you purchased a CSA share "with work discount" instead of a full price share "without working" it meant that you committed to helping out on the farm a set number of hours (Half Share=4hrs; Medium Share=6hrs; Full Share=8hrs).
It's no problem if you weren't able to get your hours in, it just means that you need to square your balance by contributing financially to cover the difference. And please don't feel guilty about it! The buyout option makes it fair for all members. It's also the main reason CSA share prices have remained the same since 2008!
$15/hour covers your missed hours.
Pretty soon we'll go through the member list and add the missed hours to your account so that when you sign in to the website you'll be able to see your new balance if you weren't able to work. We'll probably also e-mail you a reminder.
Contact us at anchorruncsa@gmail.com if you have any questions.
Workshifts this week:
- Tuesday 11/7 10am-12noon (garlic?)
- Wednesday 11/8 10am-12noon (garlic?)
Workshift sign-up instructions may be found here.
Thank you!
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
October 29, 2017
Join the Late Fall CSA and Winter CSA (2 seasons)!
Other News
by Dana Hunting
Lettuce (let us) grow produce for you this fall and winter! Affordable, abundant, organic, satisfyingly good, and nutritious vegetables! Why not?
Membership is still available for the 2017 6-week Late Fall CSA (mid-Nov through mid-Dec) as well as the 2017-2018 10-week Winter CSA (end-Dec through end-Feb). Click here for more information and to sign up!
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
October 29, 2017
Ugly But Delicious Celeriac
Other News
By Linda Dansbury
Celeriac is one of those veggies that if you are not familiar with it and you have a choice, you would probably choose to skip over it, but don't! It is delicious and nutritious. A sister to celery (actually a type of celery bred for its root), it is low calorie and fairly high in potassium and vitamin C.
Celeriac stores well in the fridge, lasting for months. Prepare it by carefully cutting away the tough, rough, outer covering (or skip the peeling part if you're like Derek and Dana and don't mind skin on your root veggies). Celeriac can be eaten raw or cooked. To eat it raw, make sure to get a "dressing" on it quickly or place in cold water with a squeeze of lemon as it oxidizes and turns brown the way potatoes and apples do when cut. Try grating some into coleslaw or making the French Remoulade which is light and delicious. There are many recipes for celeriac on this site for salads, soups, roasted veggies and more using this flexible root vegetable.
Two simple ways I enjoy it is to mix it with other roasted veggies - think a combo of some or all of the following: potatoes, sweet potatoes, leeks, garlic, winter squash, turnips, celeriac, cauliflower, beets, radishes, onions, etc. Just cut all the veggies up into a similar size and place onto a large baking sheet - drizzle olive oil, add salt and pepper to taste, mix well, and spread in a single layer. If you want, add a few sprigs of thyme or rosemary. Roast at about 425 degrees until veggies are tender and browned in spots - usually around 45 minutes. I also like it in what I call "mixed mash" - a combo of potatoes, sweet potatoes and celeriac - all boiled and mashed together - YUM!
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
October 29, 2017
Workshifts Scheduled for Week of 10/29/17
Other News
by Dana Hunting
If you still need to work your pledged hours please consider signing up for a workshift soon! In other words, when you joined the CSA you purchased a share "with work discount" instead of a share "without working".
Now that we're into November, if you'd rather contribute financially to cover the work hour cost of your share please do so soon so that we can plan accordingly. And please don't feel guilty about it! The buyout option makes it fair for all members.
$60 covers the 4 hours for a Half Share; $90 covers the 6 hours for a Medium Share; and $120 covers the 8 hours for a Full Share. E-mail us at anchorruncsa@gmail.com if you have any questions.
Workshifts this week:
- Friday 11/3 10am-12noon
- Sunday 11/5 9-11am
Workshift sign-up instructions may be found here.
Thank you!
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
October 22, 2017
More about Greens
Other News
By Linda Dansbury
We receive a lot of greens each week. Several pounds in fact! I used to make a lot of pestos and freeze quite a bit (more on easy freezing method below), and that worked when harvests ended at Thanksgiving, but now that it continues well into February, I want to use as much as I can when fresh, or things sit in my freezer and eventually are tossed due to freezer burn. Some greens can be used in multiple ways so I sometimes split them up shortly after I receive them - for instance I will put a few dandelion leaves with the salad greens and put the rest in the cooking group.
My strategy is to group greens into how I will use them - salads, smoothies, cook, preserve (either freeze or pesto/pistou for me)
  • Smoothies - regular smoothie eaters know how they like theirs. I mostly use kale and Swiss chard but have also used mizuna and the greens mix.
  • Salads - lettuces, arugula, spinach, dandelion, small Swiss chard and kale leaves, mizuna, small greens mix leaves.
  • Cooked - Tat soi, kale, Swiss chard, greens mix, broccoli raab, mustard greens, dandelion. Find recipes on this site or others and remember that many of the greens are interchangeable so if a recipe asks for spinach to be added, save your spinach for a salad, and add any or all of this list to the recipe instead.
  • Pesto, Pistou - arugula, broccoli raab - I have found for the raab that if the garlic is roasted before using in the pesto it makes it less bitter. Blanching prior to use helps too.
  • Preserving - any of the greens listed in the cooked line. A fellow member shared a great method of preserving that is so simple! Bring a large pot of water to a boil. While the water is heating, prepare whatever greens you want to preserve - remove thick stems, yellowing leaves, and rinse well. Place a colander in the sink and fill with the greens. Carefully pour boiling water over the greens and allow to drain. When cool enough to handle, squeeze the water out and make the greens into balls. Place into freezer containers or bags and freeze. So easy to pull a ball or two out of the freezer to add to soups and stews!
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
October 22, 2017
Workshifts Scheduled for Week of 10/22/17
Other News
By Derek McGeehan
Sunday's workshift harvesting carrots on a beautiful fall morning!
If you still need to work your pledged hours please consider signing up for a workshift soon! In other words, when you joined the CSA you purchased a share "with work discount" instead of a share "without working". If you'd rather contribute financially to cover the work hour cost of your share please do so soon so that we can plan accordingly. And please don't feel guilty about it! The buyout option makes it fair for all members.
$60 covers the 4 hours for a Half Share; $90 covers the 6 hours for a Medium Share; and $120 covers the 8 hours for a Full Share. E-mail us at anchorruncsa@gmail.com if you have any questions.
Workshifts this week:
- Friday 10/27 10am-12noon
- Sunday 10/29 9-11am
Workshift sign-up instructions may be found here.
Thank you!
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
October 22, 2017
Shares Still Available For Late Fall CSA and Winter CSA (2 seasons)!
Other News
by Dana Hunting
Fresh greens at the end of December 2016!
Membership is still available for the 2017 6-week Late Fall CSA (mid-Nov through mid-Dec) as well as the 2017-2018 10-week Winter CSA (end-Dec through end-Feb). Click here for more information and to sign up!
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
October 15, 2017
Rest In Peace, Jack Schieber, Long Time CSA Member
Other News
By Dana Hunting
John R. "Jack" Schieber, Jr. of Holland passed away on Wednesday, September 20, 2017 in the presence of his loving family. He was 92.
He was the loving and devoted husband of Rose Marie Kraiser Schieber, his companion for more than 70 years.
Born in Philadelphia, Jack was the son of the late John R. Schieber, Sr. and Gertrude Anna Kellenbenz Schieber.
Jack graduated from the University of Pennsylvania with a degree in Chemical Engineering. He worked at Betz Laboratories in Trevose, PA for 35 years, solving industrial water treatment problems.
A veteran of World War II, he continued to work for peace, justice, civil and human rights throughout his life. Jack was an avid outdoorsman, nature lover, explorer, a leader, a music lover, and a student of religious thought and practices. He was a beloved and long time member of the Mohawk Canoe Club, BuxMont Unitarian Universalist Fellowship and the Delaware Valley Fern and Wildflower Society and was active in numerous community endeavors.
In addition to his wife, Jack is survived by his children, Robin Hoy (Michael), David Schieber (Kat), Kendra Schieber (Ron Ogden) and Gil Schieber (Becky Brindle); his grandchildren, Lisa, Karin, David, Lauren, Scotland and Anselm; and his great-grandchildren, Julia, Caitlyn, Megan and Michael. He is also survived by his brother, Bill Schieber (Aileen), sisters in law, brothers in law and many nieces and nephews.
Relatives and friends are invited to join his family at a Memorial Service on Monday, October 16th at 11 AM at the BuxMont Unitarian Universalist Fellowship, 2040 Street Road, Warrington, PA 18976.
Contributions may be made in his memory to Bowman’s Hill Wildflower Preserve, 1635 River Rd, New Hope, PA 18938; Churchville Nature Center, 501 Churchville Lane, Churchville, PA 18966; or to the Bucks County Peace Center, 102 W Maple Ave, Langhorne, PA 19047
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
October 15, 2017
Diaper Drive
Other News
by Alescia Dingle
I am a CSA member and also a new member of the board for the Greater Philadelphia Diaper Bank (GPDB). I am running a diaper drive during the month of October and I wanted to ask if you would be so kind to share information in your newsletter and if I could have a cardboard box on site at the farm for any members who want to contribute. GPDB has distributed more than 2.4 million diapers to families in need since 2011 across Greater Philadelphia and parts of New Jersey. This month alone they distributed more than 62,000 diapers to families in need including those affected by natural disasters across the country.
One in three families experiences diaper need. This means that they cannot afford clean diapers for babies, toddlers and even adults. SNAP & WIC dollars do not cover the cost of diapers for struggling families. During the month of October I will have drop off locations in Hamilton Township, NJ,New Hope, PA and online for friends at a distance. Please help a neighbor in need by dropping off a package of diapers or making a donation online. Your donation will help The Greater Philadelphia Diaper Bank distribute diapers to families in need. This month alone GPDB distributed more than 62,000 diapers to families in need in New Jersey, Pennsylvania as well as families affected by the natural disasters across the country. Clean diapers promote good health, prevent staph infections, and allow little ones to attend preschool and parents and caregivers to go to work. Clean diapers mean heath and independence for adults. Clean Diapers are not a Privilege. We believe that all of us: babies, children and adults deserve to be clean and dry.
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
October 15, 2017
Broccoli and Cauliflower Tip
Other News
By Linda Dansbury
"I had to expand this section using my own words, to educate myself and membership." - Farmer Derek
Because our farm broccoli and cauliflower are raised organically they're more susceptible to a variety of pests and diseases in the field that conventional and sprayed organic farms might be able to treat for. Thus, after harvest and in storage they can deteriorate quickly so they should be eaten or cooked very soon after pick up.
We do all that we can to minimize pest and disease pressure on the farm in a proactive and preventative way: crop rotation, clean seed source, soil improvements like cover cropping and mineral amendments, healthy transplants, a clean and weed minimal field, floating row cover barriers. However, it is impossible to remove/eradicate all sources of scourge since there are many wild species of plants that act as hosts to our "enemies". Normally the pest pressure remains in the background, is tolerable, until conditions allow for extreme spreading.
Of the plethora of pest pressures we deal with on the farm that impact the growing of brassica family crops (cabbage, broccoli, cauliflower, kale, ect.), in the fall the two main issues we face are bacterial black rot (aka Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris) and nibbling by insects such as the harlequin bug, imported cabbage worm, cabbage looper, and cross-striped cabbage worm (more info).
The current warm and moist weather pattern exacerbates the black rot problem which spreads very quickly during these conditions. Crops that are unfortunately most susceptible seem to be broccoli and cauliflower which I believe is also because the harlequin bugs seem to enjoy munching on them the most, assisting in its spread. Of course, every time we walk through the fields to harvest these crops we also trail around the spores helping it spread. But don't worry; it's not like the entire field is a mass of smelly rotting brassicas (not yet at least). The symptoms are just obvious to you as the eater in the form of a soft/dark spot or blemish on the head. The sunny dry weather forecast for this week should halt or slow its spread. We're also near the end of the broccoli and cauliflower harvest but will need to monitor closely the adjacent cabbage patch.
Okay, back to Linda...
In my case I found what the problem was: cabbage worms/loopers hiding in the florettes! Even under refrigeration, those damaging critters keep eating, causing the heads to rot.
I learned that if I know I am not going to eat the broc/caul within a couple days, I cut the heads and carefully look for those dastardly worms and commit wormicide on any I come across. The result is the veggies keep much longer once they are not being "eaten alive".
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
October 15, 2017
Workshifts Scheduled for Week of 10/15/17
Other News
By Derek McGeehan
Friday's workshift harvesting kohlrabi.
If you still need to work your pledged hours please consider signing up for a workshift soon! In other words, when you joined the CSA you purchased a share "with work discount" instead of a share "without working". If you'd rather contribute financially to cover the work hour cost of your share please do so soon so that we can plan accordingly. And please don't feel guilty about it! The buyout option makes it fair for all members.
$60 covers the 4 hours for a Half Share; $90 covers the 6 hours for a Medium Share; and $120 covers the 8 hours for a Full Share. E-mail us at anchorruncsa@gmail.com if you have any questions.
Workshifts this week:
- Wednesday 10/18 10am-12noon
- Friday 10/20 10am-12noon
- Sunday 10/22 9-11am
Workshift sign-up instructions may be found here.
Thank you!
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
October 15, 2017
Shares Available For Late Fall CSA and Winter CSA (2 seasons)!
Other News
by Dana Hunting
Construction continues on our replacement movable hoop tunnel for winter greens.
Membership is now available for the 2017 6-week Late Fall CSA (mid-Nov through mid-Dec) as well as the 2017-2018 10-week Winter CSA (end-Dec through end-Feb). Click here for more information and to sign up!
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
October 8, 2017
Workshifts Scheduled for Week of 10/8/17
Other News
By Derek McGeehan
Some of your Farmers (Dana and Derek) enjoying the potluck on a warm summery October evening!
If you still need to work your pledged hours please consider signing up for a workshift soon! In other words, when you joined the CSA you purchased a share "with work discount" instead of a share "without working". If you'd rather contribute financially to cover the work hour cost of your share please do so soon so that we can plan accordingly. And please don't feel guilty about it! The buyout option makes it fair for all members.
$60 covers the 4 hours for a Half Share; $90 covers the 6 hours for a Medium Share; and $120 covers the 8 hours for a Full Share. E-mail us at anchorruncsa@gmail.com if you have any questions.
Workshifts this week:
- Wednesday 10/11 6-8pm: Garlic processing in barn, separating bulbs into cloves for planting the 2018 crop. This shift is physically easier on the body but does require finger and hand movement. BYOB festivity (bring a beverage of your choosing for yourself and/or to share)!
- Friday 10/13 10am-12noon
Workshift sign-up instructions may be found here.
Thank you!
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
October 8, 2017
Shares Available For Late Fall CSA and Winter CSA (2 seasons)!
Other News
by Dana Hunting
Slowly but surely the replacement hoop tunnel rises.
Membership is now available for the 2017 6-week Late Fall CSA (mid-Nov through mid-Dec) as well as the 2017-2018 10-week Winter CSA (end-Dec through end-Feb). Click here for more information and to sign up!
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
October 8, 2017
Wild for Salmon, Seafood Buying Club Order
Other News
by Dana Hunting
Place your order by October 22nd with Wild For Salmon for the best quality and sustainably harvested salmon, fish, and seafood from the wilds of Bristol Bay, Alaska, delivered conveniently to our farm.
For information and to order, please click this link. It will open a page with all of the necessary information you need to join our buying club, learn more about Wild For Salmon, and to place your order.
Please contact Wild For Salmon if you have any questions on ordering or on their products. They will deliver your order to the farm on Thursday, October 26th, for you to retrieve 1-8pm. Please let us know if you cannot make it during that pick up window and we should be able to hold your order here in our freezer.
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
October 1, 2017
Workshifts Scheduled for Week of 10/1/17
Other News
By Derek McGeehan
If you still need to work your pledged hours please consider signing up for a workshift soon! In other words, when you joined the CSA you purchased a share "with work discount" instead of a share "without working". If you'd rather contribute financially to cover the work hour cost of your share please do so soon so that we can plan accordingly. And please don't feel guilty about it! The buyout option makes it fair for all members.
$60 covers the 4 hours for a Half Share; $90 covers the 6 hours for a Medium Share; and $120 covers the 8 hours for a Full Share. E-mail us at anchorruncsa@gmail.com if you have any questions.
Workshifts this week:
- Tuesday 10/3 10am-12noon
- Wednesday 10/4 10am-12noon
- Friday 10/6 10am-12noon
- Sunday 10/8 8-10am
Workshift sign-up instructions may be found here.
Thank you!
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
September 24, 2017
Late Fall CSA and Winter CSA Memberships Available
Other News
By Derek McGeehan
Membership is now available for the 2017 6-week Late Fall CSA (mid-Nov through mid-Dec) as well as the 2017-2018 10-week Winter CSA (end-Dec through end-Feb). Click here for more information and to sign up!
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
September 24, 2017
New Green - Collards
Other News
By Linda Dansbury
Can you find the collards in the sea of green (hint: about 25% of the way down from the top)?
Collards seem to be one of those greens that people either love or hate. Honestly, it hasn't been one of my favorites but when done right, the bitterness is lessened and they are almost creamy in texture - most people are aware of the Southern method of cooking them for hours with a ham hock or other smoked meat. But how do you do them so you don't have them going all day?
You can remove the stems, roll up the leaves and cut into a chiffonade - the way you would when making cabbage. By making the leaves small, they will cook faster - add them into greens recipes with other greens. We also have a few nice recipes on this site including Skillet Squash with Collards and Barley, Collard Greens with Lima Beans and Smoked Turkey and even Collard Pesto. Try them, they are too healthy to not eat them!
Collards store pretty well, keeping longer in the fridge than most other greens.
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
September 24, 2017
Workshifts Scheduled for Week of 9/24/17
Other News
By Derek McGeehan
Prepared to help harvest sweet potatoes! (photo courtesy of Alescia Dingle)
If you still need to work your pledged hours please consider signing up for a workshift soon! In other words, when you joined the CSA you purchased a share "with work discount" instead of a share "without working". If you'd rather contribute financially to cover the work hour cost of your share please do so soon so that we can plan accordingly. And please don't feel guilty about it! The buyout option makes it fair for all members.
$60 covers the 4 hours for a Half Share; $90 covers the 6 hours for a Medium Share; and $120 covers the 8 hours for a Full Share. E-mail us at anchorruncsa@gmail.com if you have any questions.
Workshifts this week:
- Tuesday 9/26 10am-12noon
- Wednesday 9/27 10am-12noon
- Sunday 10/1 8-10am (in High Tunnel so rain or shine)
Workshift sign-up instructions may be found here.
Thank you!
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
September 24, 2017
Final Potluck of the 2017 Season (Band Included)!
Other News
by Dana Hunting
Come see these talented musicians at the farm Saturday October 7th from 4 pm 'til dark for our season's end celebration potluck! Bring a dish to share that is large enough to feed 4-6 adults, your own place settings, beverages of your choice, as well as lawn chair or blanket. Local bluegrass/folk band Goose Creek Pioneers will serenade us during the evening and there will be a campfire to warm your bones by. Bring your s'more material and tools of the roasting trade, hope to see you there!
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
September 17, 2017
Late Fall CSA and Winter CSA Membership Now Available
Other News
By Derek McGeehan
Watering in grass and clover seed sown in the subtle swales that were created for water management around our replacement movable 'hoop tunnel'. The original structure collapsed under snow load way back during the winter of 2010-2011. This simple structure of metal pipes covered in plastic provides enough protection to allow cold-hardy plants to thrive during the winter months. Think spinach, lettuce mix, baby Swiss chard, claytonia, and bok choy.
2017 Late Fall CSA
  • Full, Medium, and Half Shares are available for the 6th annual 6-week season.
  • Prices remain the same as last season: $180 for Full; $130 for Medium; $100 for Half.
  • A deposit of $50 or full payment secures your share; full payment is due by November 1st; if you join after November 1st full payment is due to finalize registration.
  • Pick up days are: Wednesday 1-8pm or Saturday 11am-12noon (you choose a day but you can switch temporarily by notifying us in advance).
  • Begins immediately following conclusion of Main Season CSA Harvest Week #26 (Week B, week of November 5th).
  • Late Fall Harvest #1 (Week A) is scheduled for week of November 12th.
  • Concludes week of December 17th.
  • No workshift discount/commitment.
  • A cold hardy fall themed continuation of the Main Season share with tasty staples like chard, spinach, lettuce, radicchio, arugula, mizuna, tatsoi, bok choy, kale, collards, cabbage, Napa cabbage, cilantro, dill, parsley, leeks, garlic, scallions, onions, beets, radishes, turnips, carrots, celeriac, kohlrabi, potatoes, and sweet potatoes.
  • Each cold season we make improvements to ensure a steady supply of fresh crops, not just storage ones. We now use 4 growing structures to extend the growing season; during our first Late Fall CSA back in 2012 we only had the high tunnel. So, our footprint has effectively tripled (each structure differs somewhat in size) and we now also add heat to the greenhouse for insurance/assurance.
  • A Full Share receives approximately 8-12 pounds of produce weekly, a Half Share every other week, and a Medium Share receives 2/3 of a Full Share weekly.
  • **During the week of Thanksgiving, Late Fall Harvest Week #2, Wednesday's pick up is on Tuesday, November 21st to accommodate travelers and holiday schedules (we'll accommodate your schedule, too)**. This is the only pick up anomaly.
  • To join, log in to the website here; the 'join' button will be on the left hand side of your members page.
  • Membership is limited and is at capacity at around 50% of the Main Season number so don't delay!
  • Worried about farm accessibility this time of year? Don't worry! Our goal is to keep the driveway clean and tidy with stone applications as needed (i.e. fill in the potholes). Last winter our tractor was at the shop for months so we were less able to maintain the driveway - sorry for that!
Abigail is learning how to drive the 95-hp tractor...
2017-2018 Winter CSA
  • Full, Medium, and Half Shares are available for the 2nd annual 10-week season (2 more weeks than last year).
  • Prices remain the same as last season: $300 for Full; $220 for Medium; $165 for Half.
  • A deposit of $75 or full payment secures your share; full payment is due by December 15th.
  • Pick up days are: Wednesday 1-8pm or Saturday 11am-12noon (you choose a day but you can switch temporarily by notifying us in advance).
  • Begins immediately following conclusion of Late Fall CSA Harvest Week #6 (Week B, week of December 17th).
  • Winter Harvest #1 (Week A) is scheduled for week of December 24th - **This week only, Wednesday's pick up is moved to Thursday, December 28th, to accommodate travelers and holiday schedules (we'll accommodate your schedule, too)**. This is the only pick up anomaly.
  • Concludes week of February 25th.
  • No workshift discount/commitment.
  • A cold hardy winter themed continuation of the Late Fall share with tasty staples like chard, spinach, lettuce, arugula, mizuna, tatsoi, bok choy, kale, collards, cabbage, Napa cabbage, herbs, leeks, garlic, scallions, onions, beets, radishes, turnips, carrots, celeriac, kohlrabi, and potatoes.
  • Each cold season we make improvements to ensure a steady supply of fresh crops, not just storage ones. We now use 4 growing structures to extend the growing season; during our first Late Fall CSA back in 2012 we only had the high tunnel. So, our footprint has effectively tripled (each structure differs somewhat in size) and we now also add heat to the greenhouse for insurance/assurance.
  • A Full Share receives approximately 8-12 pounds of produce weekly, a Half Share every other week, and a Medium Share receives 2/3 of a Full Share weekly.
  • To join, log in to the website here; the 'join' button will be on the left hand side of your members page.
  • Membership is limited and is at capacity at around 30% of the Main Season number so don't delay!
  • Worried about farm accessibility this time of year? Don't worry! Our goal is to keep the driveway clean and tidy with stone applications as needed (i.e. fill in the potholes). Last winter our tractor was at the shop for months so we were less able to maintain the driveway - sorry for that!
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
September 17, 2017
Definitely Fall Crops - Beets with Tops and Savoy Cabbage
Other News
By Linda Dansbury
The weather may feel like July, but the fall crops are really starting to take over now - quantities of tomates, peppers and eggplant have really dropped while greens and now other favorites are maturing.
Beets - there's nothing better than a fresh beet! When you get home, cut the tops off the beet roots and store separately for the best storing. This time of year - when it cools down again, consider making soups with your beets and definitely add the beet tops in near the end. Try the Savory Beet Soup, Roasted Beet and Beet Green Risotto, Chocolate Beet Cake or a recipe I just added, Beet and Beet Greens with Tahini Sauce.
Savoy Cabbage - is shaped like regular green cabbage, only prettier with it's darker, very crinkly leaves. Use it in any of your favorite cabbage recipes. Try something new with your cabbage, such as Meltaway Cabbage, Provencal Cabbage and Kale Gratin or Roasted Cabbage with Black Bean Sauce.
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
September 17, 2017
PA Maple Syrup and Honey For Sale Monday 9/18
Other News
by Dana Hunting
Susan and Todd Klikus of Augusta Acres Farm will be at Anchor Run Farm on Monday, September 18th 1:00pm-6:30pm to share and sell their pure maple syrup and pure, raw honey!
  • This is a wonderful opportunity to stock your cupboards with local sweets for the winter as well as get an early start on holiday gifts for loved ones who appreciate meaningful and edible treats.
  • Augusta Acres is located in Beach Lake, PA and is a family-run operation. They farm using only organic methods and are members of Pennsylvania Association for Sustainable Agriculture and the Pennsylvania Maple Producers Association.
  • Sap from trees located strictly on the farm is boiled down in small batches on their wood fired arch to produce a maple syrup that is dark and robust.
  • Their honey is extracted from on-farm apiaries and is an "all season", raw honey which is dark and very sweet.
Both sweets will be available for CSA members to purchase at pint and quart sizes for $15 and $24, respectively. Cash and checks are accepted when picking up; make checks payable to "Augusta Acres".
Can't make it to the farm on Monday between 1pm and 6:30pm? If you would still like to participate in this opportunity contact Susan Klikus directly at susanklikus@gmail.com and she will set aside your order to pick up on your regularly scheduled pick up day. Payment is due when you pick up your order at the farm.
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
September 17, 2017
Workshifts Scheduled for Week of 9/17/17
Other News
By Derek McGeehan
If you still need to work your pledged hours please consider signing up for a workshift soon! In other words, when you joined the CSA you purchased a share "with work discount" instead of a share "without working". If you'd rather contribute financially to cover the work hour cost of your share please do so soon so that we can plan accordingly. And please don't feel guilty about it! The buyout option makes it fair for all members.
$60 covers the 4 hours for a Half Share; $90 covers the 6 hours for a Medium Share; and $120 covers the 8 hours for a Full Share. E-mail us at anchorruncsa@gmail.com if you have any questions.
Workshifts this week:
- Wednesday 9/20 5-7pm
- Friday 9/22 10am-12noon
- Sunday 9/24 8-10am
Workshift sign-up instructions may be found here.
Thank you!
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
September 10, 2017
Book Drive
Other News
By Shyla Janannatha
Shyla Jagannatha, a member of our CSA, is conducting a book drive through the American Association of University Women - Makefield Area Branch (a 501(c)(3) organization), where she is a board member. The book drive is for the Cops 'n' Kids initiative through the branch. Cops 'n' Kids is a community literacy project to collect and donate books to children who need them and in the process help each child feel connected to their own community. To learn more about the initiative or to get involved, please visit the website. They are looking for new and very gently used books for children of all ages, but are especially in need of books for ages less than 8. If you have books to share, please bring the books in and drop them off in the collection bin marked "Cops 'n' Kids - Donate Here". Together with the AAUW-Makefield Area Branch, let's make a difference in the lives of children in our community!
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
September 10, 2017
Workshifts Scheduled for Week of 9/10/17
Other News
By Derek McGeehan
If you still need to work your pledged hours please consider signing up for a workshift soon! In other words, when you joined the CSA you purchased a share "with work discount" instead of a share "without working". If you'd rather contribute financially to cover the work hour cost of your share please do so soon so that we can plan accordingly. And please don't feel guilty about it! The buyout option makes it fair for all members.
$60 covers the 4 hours for a Half Share; $90 covers the 6 hours for a Medium Share; and $120 covers the 8 hours for a Full Share. E-mail us at anchorruncsa@gmail.com if you have any questions.
Workshifts this week:
- Tuesday 9/12 10am-12noon
- Wednesday 9/13 10am-12noon
- Friday 9/15 10am-12noon
- Sunday 9/17 8-10am
Workshift sign-up instructions may be found here.
Thank you!
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
September 10, 2017
What to do with....?
Other News
By Linda Dansbury
Usually in this space I talk about a new veggie we are receiving this week. Including how to prepare them. Everything we are receiving this week we have been receiving. I have been wondering what to make now that the nights are cooler and I have a fridge full of veggies - including a crossover of summer veggies and fall greens and squash. Make Minestrone Soup!
There are 2 recipes for it on this site (1 or 2) - check them both out to get an idea of variations - you can add almost any and every veggie you have. The recipe was developed exactly for this purpose - to use up veggies before they go bad. With the added beans, it becomes hearty. Make it one day and serve it the next for added flavor - it also thickens as it sits. Since Derek mentioned last week that the winter squash won't last very long due to pest and disease pressure, add that as well. The nice thing about the dumpling squash is you can just cut it, remove seeds and then cut into bite sized pieces. No need to remove the outer skin. It will break down as it cooks. If you are like me and save the rinds from parmesan cheese, this is the dish to add one in - adds great depth of flavor to the soup.
Enjoy the harvest!
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
September 10, 2017
Essential Oils Class Saturday September 16th 10-11am
Other News
By KaLee Lee
Have you been wondering what all the buzz is about with essential oils? Or, what they could do for you? You are invited to an exciting class on Saturday, September 16th, 10-11am to answer these questions and many more! This class will be full of great lessons learned from hilarious personal experiences, you do not have to learn all of these lessons the hard way. There will be raffles as well as yummy treats and tons of great information. We will be learning about the basics of essential oils, how you can support the wellness of you and your family, and how to eliminate chemicals from your home. Cannot wait to see you there!
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
September 10, 2017
Honey and Maple Syrup for sale!
Other News
By Dana Hunting
Susan and Todd Klikus of Augusta Acres Farm will be at Anchor Run Farm on Monday, September 18th from 1:00 - 6:30 pm to share their pure maple syrup and pure, raw honey with our CSA! This is a wonderful opportunity to stock your cupboards with local sweets for the winter and/or get an early start on holiday gifts for loved ones who appreciate meaningful and useable treats.
Augusta Acres is located in Beach Lake, PA and is a family-run operation. They farm using only organic methods and are members of Pennsylvania Association for Sustainable Agriculture and the Pennsylvania Maple Producers Association. Sap from trees located strictly on the farm is boiled down in small batches on their wood fired arch to produce a maple syrup that is dark and robust. Their honey is extracted from on-farm apiaries and is an "all season", raw honey which is dark and very sweet. Both sweets will be available for CSA members to purchase at pint and quart sizes for $15 and $24, respectively.
Don't fret if you are unable to make it to the farm on Monday, September 18th between 1:00 and 6:30 pm! If you would still like to participate in this opportunity contact Susan Klikus directly at susanklikus@gmail.com and she will set aside your order to pick up on your regularly scheduled pick up day. Payment is due when you pick up your order at the farm.
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
September 3, 2017
Workshifts Scheduled for Week of 9/3/17
Other News
By Derek McGeehan
Casting for the magical and illusive Anchor Run Farm fish.
We're past the halfway point of the season for work hour opportunities. Workshifts will be scheduled through October but frequency will diminish in September. If you still need to work your pledged hours please consider signing up for a workshift soon. If you'd rather contribute financially to cover the work hour cost of your share please do so soon so that we can plan accordingly. E-mail us at anchorruncsa@gmail.com if you have any questions.
Workshifts this week:
- Tuesday 9/5 10am-12noon
- Wednesday 9/6 6-8pm (garlic processing in barn; rain or shine)
- Friday 9/8 10am-12noon
- Sunday 9/10 7-9am
Workshift sign-up instructions may be found here.
Thank you!
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
September 3, 2017
Late Fall and Winter CSA Seasons to be Announced Soon
Other News
By Derek McGeehan
Mid-January in the high tunnel. Under a few layers of protection it's more like November. Winter hardy greens such as kale, arugula, mizuna, spinach, and chard thrive indoors in the winter.
Membership will soon be available for our 6-week Late Fall CSA and 10-week Winter CSA. We'll e-mail current Main Season members with details and sign up information this week (probably).
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
September 3, 2017
Now What!? Workshop Fall Edition
Other News
by Gia Yaccarino
Greetings fellow farm members! I am trying to get a feel for whether or not there is interest in a Fall Edition of the Now What!? Workshop. The workshop would probably be scheduled for a weekend (Saturday or Sunday) in late September or Early October. If you are interested, please contact me via email at thatgiagirl@comcast.net and please include ARF in the subject line. Let me know what you are interested in discussing and learning more about!
New members, longtime members, members who attended a previous Now What!? workshop, members who did not attend a previous Now What!? workshop (in other words - all members!) are welcome to attend!
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
September 3, 2017
Fall Crops Begin - Leeks and Winter Squash
Other News
By Linda Dansbury
Well, it definitely feels like fall as I write this, but it is supposed to warm up significantly in a couple of days. September is what I think of as the crossover season. We still enjoy our favorite summer crops of tomatoes, eggplant and peppers, and we begin to see fall crops like more greens, leeks and winter squash.
I think most people are familiar with leeks - delicious in soups and stews! If you purchase leeks in the store, you probably dread cleaning them because the sandy soil they are grown in is difficult to remove. Anchor Run leeks are so much easier - they just need a simple rinse - nothing in between all the layers! Leeks store really well in the refrigerator so if you are like me and still have onions left, use them up before using your leeks.
Winter Squash - the farmers grow many different kinds of squash - the first ones we will see are spaghetti, dumpling and acorn. All winter squash store well in cool, dry conditions. A basement is ideal. Right now the garage would be good, but with the warm up coming this week, it will not be the best location. Acorn will store the longest of the three, but they will all be good for at least 3 months - they won't last that long in my home! Farmer Derek note: We recommend eating these three winter squash varieties sooner rather than later due to field conditions they grew in and elements that they were exposed to: humidity, bugs, disease pressures, etc. A slight, even unnoticed blemish, will quickly deteriorate the squash in storage. At the farm we're still fine-tuning winter squash growing, harvesting, and storing; this season we're storing them at 50 degrees which should preserve them longer. For us, butternuts seem to keep longest.
Spaghetti Squash when cooked is what it sounds like - it comes out of the shell in strings, or spaghetti. There are many ways to cook it - steam, microwave or bake. They can be cooked whole or cut in half and cooked. I have had the most reliable success of cooking to the right texture by cutting them in half and baking with the cut side down until a fork goes through fairly easily. Time has to be watched because these squash come in so many sizes - start checking at about 30 min for a small one baked at 375. Check out this site for many spaghetti squash recipes including Italian Spaghetti Squash which I really like for now because it incorporates pepper and tomatoes. Replace the basil with parsley. Also try the Spaghetti Squash and Pork Stir Fry - Yum! Or, cook the squash and top with your favorite sauce.
Dumpling and Acorn Squash are a couple of my favorites. The flavor of them is so sweet. They are also small so a half makes a perfect sized side dish. Just cut in half, remove seeds, place a bit of butter on the cut part, sprinkle with salt and pepper and bake till tender. Or, add honey or maple syrup and a bit of cinnamon for a real taste of fall. One of the dishes I like for this time of year is the Southwestern Stuffed Acorn Squash. It again incorporates summer veggies and tastes more like summer - perfect for this "crossover" season.
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
September 3, 2017
Next Potluck Saturday 9/9/17
Other News
By Derek McGeehan
Thank you swallowtail butterfly!
Our next farm potluck meal is Saturday September 9th. We'll probably start this one at 5pm since it will be getting dark earlier. We may have a small fire if the weather allows. Join us under the pavilion for a nice meal shared with your community. Bring a dish to share that is large enough to feed 4-6 adults, your own place settings, and any beverage of your choosing. A brief note/label next to your dish will be helpful to folks with dietary restrictions.
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
August 27, 2017
Workshifts Scheduled for Week of 8/27/17
Other News
By Derek McGeehan
Direct seeded watermelon radish, purple daikon, white daikon, and hakurei turnips just coming up as a farm gnome and a farm dog look on.
We're past the halfway point of the season for work hour opportunities. Workshifts will be scheduled through October but frequency will diminish in September. If you still need to work your pledged hours please consider signing up for a workshift soon. If you'd rather contribute financially to cover the work hour cost of your share please do so soon so that we can plan accordingly. E-mail us at anchorruncsa@gmail.com if you have any questions.
Workshifts this week:
Wednesday 8/30 9-11am
Wednesday 8/30 5:30-7:30pm
Friday 9/1 9-11am
Sunday 9/3 7-9am
Workshift sign-up instructions may be found here.
Thank you!
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
August 27, 2017
Ode to the Farm
Other News
by Gia Yaccarino
The farm is my safe place. Recently, due to weather and my schedule, I had to do my U-Pick on Wednesday. That week had been a bit taxing and I recall the thought, on my way to the farm, repeating in my mind, “Just get to the farm. Just get to the farm.” When my mind is racing, once I arrive at the farm, things slow down. My cell phone is only used to take a picture of the U-pick board and maybe some photos of the beautiful crops in the fields. Otherwise, I’m disconnected from the “demands” of my daily life. Sometimes, I do my U-Pick in solitude and it becomes a deeply meditative time. It’s nothing I’ve planned – it just happens as I pick my share and I am so focused on the plants, the soil, the bugs! Other times, I see my “Farm Friends” – sometimes familiar faces and sometimes new ones! We chat about our lives, the crops, what we will do with our share. I swear I learn something new each time, whether it’s a meditative day or a chatting day or a bit of both. And before I know it – I’m done with my U-pick for the week. Can time fly and slow down at the same time?
Recently, I have been reflecting on how I am at the farm - smiling, happy, relaxed, open to different ideas and discussions. I’ve decided that I need to let that person live outside the farm also. I need to try to regain my “farm calm” when life is getting me stressed. I probably won’t go so far as to strike up a conversation with strangers at Acme (Security: Weird lady in aisle 3!) or be waving and smiling to other cars as I leave the Acme parking lot, but don’t you think we would all benefit if we shared a little more of our “farm selves” with the rest of the world? Just a thought.
- Gia
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
August 27, 2017
Yet Another U Pick Note
Other News
By Linda Dansbury
Don't waste this beautiful weather! Go outside and do your U Pick! Many probably think "I'll get back next time" - but with this cooler weather, opportunities for high quality U Pick veggies will decrease.
Again, the edamame are amazing this year, but a few plants are beginning to show signs of being past their prime so don't miss out! Again, I was able to get my allotment from just a few plants so it didn't take long at all.
The blackberries may be finished for the season. This year's harvest was an unanticipated bonus. The plants have only been in the ground since last April (2016). All of the berries this year were produced on canes that grew last season, their first in the ground. All of the big canes that stand 6 feet tall in the air on the trellising system will fruit next season which should mean greater yields and an easier time picking. Oh the anticipation!
Some of the flowers are starting to wane. Probably only 1 or 2 weeks of sunflowers are left, and with these cool nights the zinnias will also be trending downward - this has been the best flower year at the farm and I am so happy with the vases of color in my home.
The cherry tomatoes, although sparse now, still have a lot of little tomatoes on them. Don't give up - with the nice weather we are having, the tomatoes on the vines will be ripening without cracking.
Husk cherries and tomatillos will linger for another couple of weeks, but like all summertime produce, cooler temperatures and lessening daylight mean a decline in yields.
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
August 27, 2017
New Crops: Cured Garlic and Okra
Other News
By Linda Dansbury
Garlic - we have now transitioned to cured garlic, so there is no longer the need to keep it in the fridge. Store in a cool, dry area and it should keep for quite some time.
Okra - this may be something you are only familiar with in Gumbo - a staple in the deep south. Okra actually translates to the word Gumbo! It is very perishable and won't keep for more than a week in the fridge. There is a light version of gumbo on this site called Louisiana Shrimp Gumbo that is delicious. There are several other recipes as well - a couple of my favorites are Easy Indian-style Stewed Okra and Okra with Corn and Tomatoes. Fried okra is also delicious - the method can easily be found on the internet. Just don't shy away from this strange looking veggie!
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
August 20, 2017
Do you need garden or yard help?
Other News
By Field Manager Hannah
Need help preparing your yard or garden for winter? Field Manager, Hannah, and Assistant Farmer, Pat, would like to bring their gardening skills to your home!
As fall approaches, work on the farm becomes less overwhelming, making us available to assist you with projects such as:
Plantings and Garden Implementation
Hardscaping
Fall clean up
Mulching
Mowing
Weeding
Leaf removal
Using our knowledge of sustainable plant care from Anchor Run, all of our work will have the health of your family and the environment in mind.
Contact Hannah at barefootfarmersgardening@gmail.com to arrange a free consultation!
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
August 20, 2017
Workshifts Scheduled for Week of 8/20/17
Other News
By Derek McGeehan
A favorite pastime of many a kid at the farm, strawbale hoppin' is best during a nice sunset.
We're past the halfway point of the season for work hour opportunities. Workshifts will be scheduled through October but frequency will diminish in September. If you still need to work your pledged hours please consider signing up for a workshift soon. If you'd rather contribute financially to cover the work hour cost of your share please do so soon so that we can plan accordingly. E-mail us at anchorruncsa@gmail.com if you have any questions.
Workshifts this week:
Tuesday 8/22 9-11am
Wednesday 8/23 9-11am
Wednesday 8/23 6-8pm
Friday 8/25 9-11am
Sunday 8/27 7-9am
Workshift sign-up instructions may be found here.
Thank you!
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
August 20, 2017
Tick Avoidance and Prevention
Other News
By Evelyn Throne
Ideas on avoiding ticks:
Here are a few user-friendly, safe, and effective tick-borne disease prevention tips:
1) Use Sawyer Insect Repellant with 20% Picaridin or Repel w/Lemon Eucalyptus on your skin. These are safe for children and actually smell good.
2) Ticks start low and crawl up, a great prevention tip is to spray your shoes ahead of time with Sawyer 0.5% Permethrin spray available at Dicks Sporting Goods.
3) Pre-treated clothing can be bought through Insect Shield or www.BugBeWear.com or at a local sporting goods store. I heartily recommend purchasing insect repellant socks.
4) Using a lint roller will do a good job removing ticks on your skin and putting your clothing in the dryer for 15 minutes will dry out and kill any ticks on them.
5) For more great information go to: www.tickencounter.org or www.palyme.org
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
August 20, 2017
Even more about U Pick
Other News
By Linda Dansbury
Fall brassicas loving the rain and cool nights, thriving, with intentionally grown mowed weeds in the aisles for erosion control. And that's a nice sunset with a wagon towed.
Typically around this time of year, many members stop doing their U Pick - free time is reduced due to back to school commitments or other things. Remember that U pick is a large part of your share and from now through September when U Pick will end except for some herbs is as pleasant a time as any to be out in the field. The heat and humidity drop, the cherry tomatoes make a comeback because of lower humidity and less rain (typically), and green beans and edamame are perfect for picking. And, I always feel my house is more welcoming for both family and guests when flower vases are filled.
Edamame this year are as nice as they have been in a few years. Ample rainfall allowed for an abundance of well-filled pods, many with 3 beans. Don't miss out! I picked my allotment from only about 4 plants so it didn't take long.
Are you wondering about the blackberries only being on the lower branches, instead of up higher where they would be easier to find and pick? Blackberries bear fruit on second year branches, or canes. So those beautiful branches that are trellised now are where the berries will be next year. In the meantime, take a little time and push the grass away to find some of the largest, juiciest berries!
Enjoy!
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
August 13, 2017
Workshifts Scheduled for Week of 8/13/17
Other News
By Derek McGeehan
This crew helped us harvest the very first round of 2017 potatoes on Friday!
We're past the halfway point of the season for work hour opportunities. Workshifts will be scheduled through October but frequency will diminish in September. If you still need to work your pledged hours please consider signing up for a workshift soon. If you'd rather contribute financially to cover the work hour cost of your share please do so soon so that we can plan accordingly. E-mail us at anchorruncsa@gmail.com if you have any questions.
Workshifts this week:
Tuesday 8/15 9-11am
Wednesday 8/16 9-11am POTATOES?!
Wednesday 8/16 6-8pm POTATOES?!
Friday 8/18 9-11am
Sunday 8/20 7-9am
Workshift sign-up instructions may be found here.
Thank you!
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
August 13, 2017
Hooray for Edamame!
Other News
By Linda Dansbury
Edamame is one of the highly anticipated crops at the farm. Edamame, another name for fresh soybeans are fun, delicious and nutritious. I have been watching the pods fill out and they are beautiful this year - Derek says it is due to the regular rains (irregular for July!) that are making the plants so robust. As with several other crops we pick, the beans at the bottom will be the most filled out and ready.
To enjoy, they should be cooked - bring a large pot of water to a boil and generously salt the water. Add edamame and cook at a gentle boil for about 8-10 minutes - start checking for doneness after 7 minutes. The size of the beans will make a difference in how long they take to cook, so it could be as much as 12 minutes this year. Be care that the water doesn't boil over - it tends to foam up quite a bit.
Once cooked, you can eat as a snack by "sucking" the beans out of the pod, or you can squeeze the beans out and use in recipes that call for edamame or lima beans. They also freeze well. Dry them the best that you can, lay them on a cookie sheet and freeze. When frozen, place in a plastic bag or container and store until use. There are many recipes on this site for edamame, including Edamame Hummus. I know that my first picking will be gobbled up as snacks.
Blackberries are a wonderful treat from the farm. Just a quick note on picking. For the best tasting berries, pick only those that are completely black - no red blush left - the sweetest ones are those that come off the plant easily when given a slight tug. Be gentle - they are very perishable!
Potatoes will be distributed very soon. The "Dark Red Norland" variety we will start receiving either this week or next does not need to be refrigerated, but it is not a storage potato, so enjoy them within about 3 - 4 weeks for best taste.
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
August 6, 2017
Potential New Land Protein Partnership
Other News
By Derek McGeehan
We're sad to announce that our partnership with Ledamete Grass Farm is now over. But, we're excited to announce that we've connected with another local and Certified Organic pastured animal farm, Hershberger Heritage Farm, located in Sellersville, Bucks County, PA. Please peruse their website to find out what they offer and to learn more about them. They plan to come to Anchor Run Farm Monday 8/14, Thursday 8/17, Monday 8/21, and Thursday 8/24 to introduce themselves and sell their products. We'll share more details about this new partnership in upcoming e-mails.
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
August 6, 2017
Workshifts Scheduled for Week of 8/6/17
Other News
By Derek McGeehan
Flowering buckwheat cover crop
We're past the halfway point of the season for work hour opportunities. Workshifts will be scheduled through October but frequency will diminish in September. If you still need to work your pledged hours please consider signing up for a workshift soon. If you'd rather contribute financially to cover the work hour cost of your share please do so soon so that we can plan accordingly. E-mail us at anchorruncsa@gmail.com if you have any questions.Workshifts this week:
Wednesday 8/9 9-11am
Wednesday 8/9 2-4pm
Wednesday 8/9 6-8pm
Friday 8/11 9-11am
Sunday 8/13 7-9am
Workshift sign-up instructions may be found here.
Thank you!
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
August 6, 2017
Yummy Peppers
Other News
By Linda Dansbury
Bumblebee about to land on flowering anise hyssop in the herb garden
To me, having written these columns now for a dozen years or so (Yikes!), peppers seem to come into the pick up room with virtually no fanfare or celebration - tomatoes and fresh garlic get all the attention. But peppers are delicious, nutritious and pretty. They are typically added to dishes rather than being the star. Hopefully this year's crop will be plentiful and long lasting because peppers are very versatile. Take a look at this site and you will see several interesting recipes: Eggplant Dip with Roasted Red Peppers, Pepper Puree, several versions of Roasted Red Peppers, and more. Every year I make several batches of Roasted Red Peppers, usually with garlic, olive oil and a splash of balsamic vinegar. They keep well in the fridge and I use them in sandwiches, as a bruschetta, and mixed into salads with other hearty ingredients. Last year, fellow member Carolyn Lyday sent me an email about Pepper Puree, opening my eyes to new uses for this veggie. The puree keeps well and can even be frozen, giving meals in the middle of winter a nice fresh taste.
Store peppers in plastic in your fridge for best keeping. They will keep for at least 10 days.
I wanted to find a recipe in which peppers take center stage - so I searched and found Grilled Pepper and Torn Mozzarella Panzanella. Panzanella is simply a bread salad - I often have parts of delicious, rustic breads from the farmers market left over and this is a great way to use them. Most panzanellas are made with tomatoes, but I decided to try this one. I hope you like it. Send your ideas to me at lindadansbury@comcast.net
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
July 30, 2017
Workshifts Scheduled for Week of 7/30/17
Other News
By Derek McGeehan
We're past the halfway point of the season for work hour opportunities. Workshifts will be scheduled through October but frequency will diminish in September. If you still need to work your pledged hours please consider signing up for a workshift soon. If you'd rather contribute financially to cover the work hour cost of your share please do so soon so that we can plan accordingly. E-mail us at anchorruncsa@gmail.com if you have any questions.
Workshifts this week:
Tuesday 8/1 9-11am
Wednesday 8/2 9-11am
Wednesday 8/2 6-8pm
Friday 8/4 9-11am
Sunday 8/6 7-9am
Workshift sign-up instructions may be found here.
Thank you!
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
July 30, 2017
Enjoying U-Pick
Other News
By Linda Dansbury
I hope everyone is getting outside to do U-pick in this awesome weather. I did mine yesterday afternoon and it was so nice to be outside. I thought of a couple of things I wanted to share.
The cherry tomatoes are coming on strong now, and if Mother Nature/diseases are kind, we will be picking these delicious gems for about another month or so. The farm grows all delicious varieties that they have tested for years and found to be the best adapted to our area, with good harvests and of course, great taste. When picking, check to make sure you are picking ripe fruit - since they are different colors, just check near the bottom of the plants for the most ripe tomatoes - that will show you what color you need to pick for the most delicious taste. The first rows you come to is the prized Sun Gold variety - they are ripe when they turn orange, so even though they look really pretty when they are yellow, leave those to ripen for a few more days. Other tomatoes are red, but with varying shades, so just take your time and see which ones are most ripe. There is also the Black Cherry heirloom variety that is one of my favorites. It is dark, almost purple at the bottom but usually maintains green "shoulders", even when fully ripe. Yum!
The tomatillos are abundant right now. I picked my allotment in about 2 minutes and didn't move from a single spot - a few of the ones I picked were actually laying on the ground. Don't miss out on this delicious veggie - just search this site for ideas.
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
July 23, 2017
New Crops: fresh onions, carrots, husk cherries and tomatillos
Other News
By Linda Dansbury
The farm was a very busy place this past week: a lot of heavy harvesting and hauling it all in - once again demonstrating that even under the harshest conditions, farmers are some of the hardest working people on the planet!
We have a lot of new crops this week, a couple very familiar and a couple maybe not so for some of you.
Fresh onions - not much to say here - use them like any other onion, but like with the uncured garlic, these must be stored in the fridge in plastic. They will keep for at least a few weeks.
Carrots - store in plastic in the crisper drawer of your fridge - I know I don't need to say more - these sweet delights will not stay in your household for long.
Tomatillos - I think this is an underused veggie in at least this part of the country. They are in the nightshade family, along with tomatoes and eggplant. As such, they are very, very nutritious! As Derek shows in the picture, they are ripe when the husks start to split and you can find them toward the bottom of the plants. After the heavy rain, some may be laying on the ground - don't count them out, they may still be good. Ripe ones can be light green to almost a gold color and some even have a purple hue. They keep well stored in plastic in the fridge, lasting a few weeks at least. I say that because I often save up a couple of weeks worth of tomatillos and then make a large batch of sauce/salsa with them. They can be cut up and added raw into salads, grilled or roasted and made into sauce or salsa, used in soups (don't know that we want to go there right now)! As I enjoy mine, I will talk more, but for now, please check out the many recipes on this site - including Slow Cooker Chicken or Pork Chile Verde (slow cookers are a great way to go in the summer, since they don't heat up the kitchen), Cooked Tomatillo Salsa Verde and Chicken Stew with Tomatillo Sauce (one of my favorites).
Husk Cherries - another name for these tasty treats is ground cherries, because when they are ripe they fall to the ground. Also in the nightshade family these fruits are nutritionally packed. Husk Cherries have a tropical taste, some descriptions say they are reminiscent of lychee, pineapple, with a little grape and tomato flavor - I know their taste is unique. They are also unique in their storage - they need no refrigeration if left in their husks. I leave mine in a bowl on the kitchen counter and whenever we walk by we can just grab a couple. They can also be added to salads, jams and pies, and can be used alone or with other fruits in sauces for meats. There are a few recipes on this site but if you have one, please let me know at lindadansbury@comcast.net.
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
July 23, 2017
Potluck Celebration Saturday 8/5 6-8pm
Other News
By Derek McGeehan
Our next farm potluck meal is Saturday August 5th 6-8pm. Join us under the pavilion for a nice meal shared with your community. Bring a dish to share that is large enough to feed 4-6 adults, your own place settings, and any beverage of your choosing. A brief note/label next to your dish will be helpful to folks with dietary restrictions. The 8th is Gabe's 4th birthday so we'll probably sing the song for him!
Sunday August 6th 6-8pm will be the rainout date.
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
July 23, 2017
Workshifts Scheduled for Week of 7/23/17
Other News
By Derek McGeehan
Workshifts this week:
Wednesday 7/26 9-11am
Wednesday 7/26 6-8pm
Friday 7/28 9-11am
Saturday 7/29 9-11am
Workshift sign-up instructions may be found here.
Thank you!
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
July 23, 2017
Rise and Fall of Beloved Veggies
Other News
By Derek McGeehan
It's the time of year when disease and pest pressure overwhelms some crops and we start to say goodbye until next year. Bad news first then some good news.
Crops that are currently beginning to show symptoms and will soon be unavailable in the pick up room include summer squash (downy mildew, powdery mildew), cucumbers (downy mildew, bacterial wilt, mosaic virus), and basil (downy mildew, fusarium wilt). Squash and cucumbers should be around for another few weeks but basil may be here for only one more week. Besides tomatoes, these crops are probably the most sensitive to disease and pest pressure and are generally outliers. All of the crops that we grow can be successfully managed completely organically with proactive measures such as crop rotation, maintaining soil health and fertility, and pest barriers like floating row cover. We choose to not resort to organically approved/organically derived sprays when disease or pests arrive.
Crops that as of now appear healthy and should soon grace our tables include watermelon, potatoes, onions, tomatillos, husk cherries, blackberries, dill, cilantro, okra, hot peppers, and carrots, as well as an ongoing supply of sweet peppers, eggplant, tomatoes, beans, and lettuces, among other crops.
Some other crops that are nearing the end of their harvest and distribution are fennel, celery, beets, kohlrabi, chard, and cabbage but all except celery will return in late summer and fall. We'll have celeriac instead of celery.
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
July 17, 2017
Workshifts Scheduled for Week of 7/16/17
Other News
By Derek McGeehan
We'll probably begin the hopefully awesome carrot harvest this week so most of the shifts should be family friendly. Please do not sign kids up online. If they work while they're here sign them in with yourself and they'll receive credit. Please note that we need the ground to be dry to harvest the carrots. When the ground is dry enough and we think we're ready to attempt retrieval of the entire patch we'll probably send out an e-mail asking for help.
Workshifts this week:
Wednesday 7/19 9-11am
Wednesday 7/19 6-8pm
Friday 7/21 9-11am
Sunday 7/23 7-9am
Workshift sign-up instructions may be found here.
Thank you!
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
July 16, 2017
Member/Chef Recipe
Other News
By Linda Dansbury
Green sweet Italian-type peppers looking good on strong healthy plants aided by string support this year.
Luke Smithson is a long time fellow Anchor Run member and an excellent chef. He is the Executive Chef at Jamie Hollander Catering and Events in New Hope. Luke personally cooked for Dana and Derek's wedding. He’s also a gardener and expert forager and loves to share his passion for local foods and their historical use.
Last week he did a chef demo at Wrightstown Farmers Market and was kind enough to share his recipe so I can share it with you. It is called Corn and Mushroom Succotash.
Instead of the traditional corn with shelling beans (example lima beans) found in succotash, Luke replaces the beans with locally grown mushrooms - and he adds a lot of other local seasonal ingredients, so check out the recipe by clicking on the link above and enjoy your harvest by making the delicious dish!
Thank you Luke!
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
July 16, 2017
Another U-Pick Tip
Other News
By Linda Dansbury
Gabe and Abigail sample a red round field tomato to see if they're ready for harvest.
I am having a wonderful time cutting the flowers at the farm - they are so beautiful. But...they wilt so fast that by the time you get home, they already look sad - they do perk back up, but I am sure the stress takes a couple days off of their vase life. I have large mason jars, so I put some water in the jar and right after I cut the flowers, they go into the jar. I nestle the jar in the front seat of my car and when I get home they are as fresh as when I cut them. Besides keeping the flowers fresh, it gives me extra time to re-cut and arrange the flowers so I don't need to do it as soon as I get home. The other option is a wet towel or paper towels, a plastic bag and a rubber band.
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
July 9, 2017
Workshifts Scheduled for Week of 7/9/17
Other News
By Derek McGeehan
Sunday's two workshifts harvested and hung approximately 8,500 garlic bulbs, 75% of the patch, to dry and cure in the barn (above photo courtesy of Hannah).
Workshifts this week:
Wednesday 7/12 10am-12noon
Wednesday 7/12 6-8pm
Friday 7/14 10am-12noon
Sunday 7/16 7-9am
Workshift sign-up instructions may be found here.
Thank you!
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
July 9, 2017
Fresh Garlic, Cucumber Idea and a Few Storage Tips
Other News
By Linda Dansbury
A potluck rainbow!
This week is the garlic harvest and that means we will receive fresh garlic - Yay! Fresh garlic is what is harvested from the field, prior to being hung and cured into the bulbs with the papery protective covers we are used to seeing. Since it hasn't gone through the curing process, it needs to be stored in the refrigerator. Other than that, use it just like any other garlic in recipes. Please note - Anchor Run garlic is very fresh, even when cured so it is much stronger than what is purchased in the grocery store.
While in the pick up room somebody asked what to do with all the cucumbers - aside from salads, cutting up to snack on, try making the Narrow Bridge Farm Refrigerator Pickles. Don't think canning - these are much simpler - and very tasty!
Much of what we receive can just be put in plastic and stored in the fridge/crisper drawer of the refrigerator.
One thing that recently happened to me so I am sure it has also happened to some of you is I came home with my harvest and placed everything needing refrigeration into the fridge. Some things I didn't touch for a few days. When I pulled what had been a beautiful head of butterhead lettuce out of the fridge, the leaves that were on the side the head was sitting on were starting to rot! I remembered then that some of the items we receive are still quite wet from the washing station when we pick it up. There are a couple of simple solutions:
1. Lightly wrap the lettuce in a light towel and then place in plastic bag and refrigerate.
2. Purchase the containers that have an insert to keep the veggie out of the water.
Celery needs high moisture to keep from wilting quickly, so if you wrap the cut bottom in a wet towel/paper towel and then put into a sealed plastic container or bag and store in the crisper of the fridge, it will keep better than without the added attention.
Basil is an exception from refrigerating being one thing that does not like being cold. To keep it fresh, snip the ends when you get home and place in a glass of water and leave the glass on your kitchen counter. To keep it even longer, place a plastic bag over it. Basil can also be stored for a few days in the door of the refrigerator - just don't forget it is there!
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
July 2, 2017
Celery and Fennel New this Week
Other News
By Linda Dansbury
Very soon we will bid a sad farewell to beets, kale and romaine - all of which will make a return in the fall. But, we happily say hello to fennel and celery.
Celery is said to detoxify the body and lower blood pressure. Everyone knows about snacking on celery, either by itself or with some cheese, dip or peanut butter. Also added to potato salads. But, did you know that it is also delicious cooked? Check out the Braised Celery and Italian Celery Soup Recipes on this site. I have made both in the past and they are nice recipes. Make sure to store your celery in a plastic bag in the crisper drawer in your fridge or it will wilt quickly.
Fennel is high in vitamins C and B6, contains phytonutrients, plus has some chloresterol lowering properties. Fennel is eaten both raw and cooked - I prefer cooked fennel, or when used in a salad with other ingredients, but my Italian relatives always had it on the table during big holiday meals - they say raw fennel helps aid in digestion. This site has several fennel recipes. Try the Roasted Fennel and White Bean Dip, Lentil Salad with Fennel and Herbs, Fennel, Radicchio and Proscuitto Salad - actually, there are A LOT of yummy recipes on this site so try them!
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
July 2, 2017
Potluck Meal Saturday 7/8
Other News
This bumblebee snacks on some nectar on a sunflower in the u-pick flower garden and will unintentionally transfer pollen so the sunflower can reproduce. Symbiosis!
Our next farm potluck meal is Saturday July 8th 6-8pm. Join us under the pavilion for a nice meal shared with your community. Bring a dish to share that is large enough to feed 4-6 adults, your own place settings, and any beverage of your choosing. A brief note/label next to your dish will be helpful to folks with dietary restrictions.
Hope to see you there!
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
July 2, 2017
Workshifts Scheduled for Week of 7/2/17
Other News
Heirloom tomatoes love growing in the protective high tunnel. Soon they'll be 8 feet tall and producing the best tasting tomatoes in this universe (they're pretty good)!
Workshifts this week:
Wednesday 7/5 10am-12noon
Wednesday 7/5 6-8pm
Friday 7/7 10am-12noon
Sunday 7/9 8-10am
Workshift sign-up instructions may be found here.
Thank you!
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
June 25, 2017
Summer Squash and Cucumbers
Other News
By Linda Dansbury
The transition to summer crops is now in full swing with the start of the cucurbit season. If Mother Nature and the nasty insects which cause diseases and prematurely kill the plants are kind to us, we will receive at least a few pounds of each for the next month or two.
Maybe that causes you to say "Uh oh! How will we manage to eat all of that!?" I actually find these 2 crops pretty easy to keep up with. Please send me the ways you enjoy these 2 veggies at lindadansbury@comcast.net and use Anchor Run in the subject line. Below are a few of my ideas on enjoying these delicious veggies.
Cucumbers - I love to just cut them up and eat them along with lunches or as a snack while preparing dinner. I also slice them into mixed green salads, or make cucumber salads. I love the way my grandmother used to make them: sliced very thin, using a mandolin, add thinly sliced scallions and fresh chopped parsley. Make a simple vinaigrette of pepper and a little salt, celery salt, cider vinegar or red wine vinegar and a neutral oil, such as canola. Or make it Asian style, slicing thin again, adding sliced scallions and freshly chopped cilantro. The dressing consists of rice wine vinegar, a neutral oil, a bit of fish sauce, sugar, sesame oil and soy sauce and your favorite pepper. Both versions are delicious! Or...make pickles! If you are not into fermenting or true canning, then try the Narrow Bridge Farm Refrigerator Pickle recipe on this site. As the harvest continues, you will see different shapes and colors of cucs in the pick up room - try them all - there are subtle differences and all are enjoyable.
Summer Squash - the first thing about this crop is to embrace all the colors and shapes there are. Many if not most of the recipes found will say "zucchini" which really translates into the long green version of the crop. For this site, any recipe that has been added over the years has "Summer Squash" in its title. Recipes can be made using any of the squash you choose. I like the assorted colors in a finished platter or dish. One of the easiest and my favorite method of cooking is to grill them. If they are large, cut or slice them. Brush with a bit of olive oil. Place on grill - the small ones may need to go in a grill basket to prevent losing them between the grates. Keep a close eye on them and turn when the one side starts to brown. Depending on the grill it may only take 2-3 minutes. When they are lightly browned on all sides and just tender, remove from grill to a platter. From there, you can drizzle with a bit of olive oil and sprinkle with salt, pepper and a grated hard cheese, and top with chopped herb or herbs of your choice - all or none of the add-ons are fine, The truth is that the grilled squash is delicious plain. The squash can be it's own dish, or a part of a platter of an assortment of other grilled veggies, cheeses, cured meats, etc. Or mixed into a hot or cold pasta dish. The options are endless!
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
June 25, 2017
Workshifts Scheduled for Week of 6/25/17
Other News
Workshifts this week:
Wednesday 6/28 10am-12noon
Friday 6/30 10am-12noon
Sunday 7/2 8-10am
Workshift sign-up instructions may be found here.
Thank you!
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
June 25, 2017
Now What!? Workshop 2 Recap
Other News
Gia Yaccarino
As predicted, the second Now What!? workshop was just as fun and interactive as the first. A diverse group of members attended – all who shared their own unique perspectives!
We spent some time talking about different storage techniques, what works, what doesn’t and what items (and how) to save for winter. We talked about what our favorite vegetable from our share is. One member even shared the worst part of being a member of Anchor Run CSA – she can never buy store bought strawberries again! I feel her pain! And of course, we ate! I had 2 versions of Kale Stem pesto – one with galic scapes and neither with olive oil, some dehydrated tomatoes and a quiche with greens from weeks 3 & 4 (kohlrabi, turnip and radish greens specifically!).
There was some talk about bug and tick avoidance/prevention and we were lucky enough to have Evelyn at the workshop, for her to share her expertise! We ended the workshop (a little late) in the herb garden. I mentioned that my favorite is Sorrel – or as they call it at my work when I share it – lemon lettuce! Papalo is another unique herb in the herb garden that adds a bit of a zip to a Mexican meal! Overall, this second workshop again reinforced what is so awesome about being a member of Anchor Run CSA – aside from the produce, of course! It’s the members, the community!
Thank you to all who attended, you really made my day and got me really excited about the upcoming potluck on Saturday July 8th! I’m thinking about making Lemon-Basil-Blueberry Cornbread!
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
June 25, 2017
U-pick Tips
Other News
By Linda Dansbury
The u-pick flower garden is located in Field #1 this season, along with beans, edamame, cherry tomatoes, peas, strawberries, blackberries, and some annual herbs.
By now you have had at least a few trips to the u-pick field. Before we know it, the main u-pick season will be upon us in which u-pick can take an hour or more so I thought I would provide a few tips to help your enjoyment.
1. Wear appropriate shoes - sometimes where we are picking the ground is very uneven and has some weed pressure - flip flops, although nice and cool, may not be study enough when trying to pick certain crops.
2. Wear hats, sunscreen, sunglasses, etc to protect yourself and your children from the scorching sun. And bring/drink plenty of water!
3. Be aware of ticks and other bugs that are typically found in a natural setting. Check yourself for ticks when you get home or before bedtime.
4. Bring your scissors, and especially when cutting herbs like basil, be careful not to cut to the bottom of the plant - cut just above where another shoot can sprout so that the crop will last longer for all.
5. On hot days, if you are able, do your u-pick in the morning or evening. Not only will it be more comfortable for you, but the plants will not be as wilted so what you pick will be in its best condition.
6. Please bring the containers back to the barn. It is best to bring the size container you need to measure your u-pick and when you are finished, put your alottment into another container and return the "measuring container" back to the barn.
Have fun out there!
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
June 25, 2017
Next Potluck Saturday July 8th
Other News
Our next farm potluck meal is Saturday July 8th 6-8pm. Join us under the pavilion for a nice meal shared with your community. Bring a dish to share that is large enough to feed 4-6 adults, your own place settings, and any beverage of your choosing. A brief note/label next to your dish will be helpful to folks with dietary restrictions.
Hope to see you there!
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
June 18, 2017
Introducing Pat and Joe
Other News
Over the next few weeks we'll introduce individual members of the crew to the Anchor Run CSA community. For more information check out our Farmer Bio page. Hannah and John were introduced last week.
Patrick McGowan is looking forward to being an assistant farmer this season at Anchor Run farm. His family has been a CSA member for some years, during which time Pat has been introduced to the CSA concept and working in the fields. He's hoping the experience he gains here, along with his past landscaping job and love of growing, will help him with the related studies he plans to pursue at Delaware Valley University.
Pat is a resident of Churchville and a 2015 graduate of Council Rock South. He is also the builder of the dry-stack stone walls outside of the pick up room in the new garden area.
Joe Phillipps is excited to be a part of Anchor Run. Having been a member of the CSA for several years, he is finally able to try his hand at farm work, something that interested him since he was a little kid helping his mom in her garden. He has a passion for trying new things and constantly reminds himself that anything is worth exploring for the experience. His love of the outdoors has led him to join the soccer team in high school, jog regularly throughout Newtown, lifeguard at Sesame Place, and, more recently, plan to attend University in Wyoming, where he hopes to learn all about life in the west, including back country survival and horsemanship, while pursuing a degree in Liberal Arts.
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
June 18, 2017
Pre-Order from Ledamete Grass Farm!
Other News
Ledamete Grass Market at Anchor Run Farm!
Order Online Today!
Ledamete Grass Farm will be delivering PRE-ORDERS to Anchor Run Farm for pick up on Thursday, June 29th! Can't make it the 29th? Don't worry, your order will be held in Anchor Run's freezers for up to two weeks until you can retrieve it.
*PRE-ORDERS will be bagged/name-tagged and left in the freezer for self-service pick up.
Order Your Pastured Meats Today- Deadline Midnight June 21st!
100% Grassfed Beef- spicy sticks, sweet sticks, BBQ sticks, Teriyaki sticks, hog dogs, ground beef, burgers, steaks, London Broil, brisket and more!
Pastured Chicken- bone-in breasts, boneless breasts, drumsticks, wings, and thighs
PRE-ORDERS ONLY!!
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
June 18, 2017
Grilled Greens?
Other News
By Linda Dansbury
You may still be in the pick up room or at home saying "what am I going to do with all of these greens?" Looking at the long list that Derek sends me each week gets me thinking ahead of time on what to do with things so that I can offer help to you.
This past week and coming week both had beautiful heads of romaine and we may receive radicchio this coming week. One of our favorite ways to eat both of these is to grill them - yes, grill your greens!
Cut both of them into quarters, keeping the cores in tact so that they stay together. Any leaves that fall off can be added to any salads. Brush with olive oil. Place on grill and do not walk away! Just lightly char the quarters on the cut sides. When lightly charred, take off the grill. For the radicchio, I drizzle lightly with a nice olive oil and a tiny bit of balsamic vinegar and salt and pepper. The romaine could be treated the same way, but I typically make it into a Caesar salad. Instead of making my own dressing, I usually have a jar of OPA Caesar in the fridge. It is Greek yogurt based - you can jazz it up with added garlic, olive oil and parm cheese if you like.
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
June 18, 2017
Workshifts Scheduled for Week of 6/18/17
Other News
Workshifts this week:
Wednesday 6/21 10am-12noon
Wednesday 6/21 6-8pm
Friday 6/23 10am-12noon
Sunday 6/25 8-10am
Workshift sign-up instructions may be found here.
Thank you!
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
June 11, 2017
Beets and Scapes
Other News
By Linda Dansbury
An eastern box turtle was found on the farm on Saturday!
Two yummy newcomers to the pick up room this week are beets and scapes. As with the turnips, when you get the beets home, cut the tops off and store separate from the beets. They keep better and the nutrient profile holds better too. Beets are so delicious right now because they haven't been stored so their sugars are at their highest. Beets are delicious raw - slice thin or grate and put into salads. We also have a lot of recipes on this site - if we are lucky we will receive a lot of beets throughout the year so try several of them - one of my favorites is the Roasted Beet and Beet Green Risotto. The color is beautiful and it tastes delicious! If you like to bake, try the Chocolate Beet Cake - it is so moist and delicious. Or, simply roast the beets and make a batch of your favorite dijon vinaigrette and place the beets into the dressing - they will keep like this for days - you can take out the amount you want and snack on them, add to salads or put a few slices on a sandwich - yum!
(Garlic) scapes are the other new item - my pick up day is Thursday, so I already got the pleasure of having some of them. The scapes are the flower stalk of the garlic plant - the farmers must remove these stalks or the strength of the plant will go into the flower rather than the bulbs. Like with the green garlic, the scapes must be kept in the fridge. They keep for quite awhile, but once you try them, you will use them! Chop them up and add to any recipe that calls for garlic - BUT - don't cook them for long because the flavor does not hold under long, high heat. If I use them in some type of stir fry or saute, I add them with the greens at the end of the process. You can make them into pesto or dips - Garlic Scape and White Bean Dip is one of my favorites and the Garlic Scape Pesto is delicious too!
Enjoy!!
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
June 11, 2017
"Now What!?" Workshops
Other News
The pergola honoring Jeannine Vannais is now completely complete. Thanks go out to members who helped fund the project by purchasing From Asparagus to Zucchini cookbooks!
Did you miss it? Don’t worry (Be Happy!)
The next Now What!? Workshop is scheduled for Saturday, June 24, 1–3pm!
The first of 2 Now What!? Workshops was attended by an actively engaged group of members! Kudos was given to Linda for her weekly column explaining how she uses her share. Thanks Linda! At the workshop, we discussed ways to store all of the produce we obtain as part of our share, as well as ways to add it to our diets and what to (and how to) save for the winter. I spoke about having the right tools to make the prep work easier and showed some examples. We also spent a good deal of time talking about using a dehydrator. And of course, we ate! I had 2 versions of Kale Stem pesto, a dip which used dehydrated tomatoes, Kohlrabi in a Teriyaki-Peanut Sauce and a quiche featuring produce from Weeks 3 & 4.
I anticipate the second Now What!? Workshop to be just as much fun! Please try to fit it in during this busy time of the year.
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
June 11, 2017
Wish List for the Farm
Other News
Below is an ongoing list of items the farm could use more of and you may have laying around unused and are hoping to get rid of. E-mail us (anchorruncsa@gmail.com) if you have something you'd like to drop off. Thanks!
  • Functional bikes
  • Yard and garden tools
  • Plastic bags (grocery bags)
  • Sharpies
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
June 4, 2017
Turnips and Kohlrabi
Other News
By Linda Dansbury
Did the kids pick that quart of peas or was it a prop for the photo, picked by Dana? Well, they do know how to eat and enjoy them at least.
Turnips and kohlrabi are both very flexible veggies - both are delicious raw as well as cooked. Both also keep well in the fridge so you don't have to rush to consume them. Their uses overlap each other and they can be prepared in the same ways. The turnips do not need to be peeled and can be used in place of radishes in salads or as a snack. The mild flavor of spring kohlrabi also makes it a delicious snack - carefully peel the skin off before eating.
Cut the turnip tops off as soon as you get them home and store separately. The tops can be used in saute's, stir fries and soups/stews.
Check out recipes for slaws on this site using the kohlrabi and turnips - instead of cabbage, try mizuna, the Anchor Run custom greens mix, Swiss chard and other greens - eat them up quickly because the dressing will wilt the greens when stored overnight.
Check out the Turnip Green and White Saute as a cooked recipe. I also like to steam the turnips and then make a simple dipping sauce and serve along with dumplings for a delicious appetizer or a light dinner.
Kohlrabi and turnips both can be turned into chips/fries when baked in the oven. Check out the Kohlrabi Fries recipe on this site.
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
May 28, 2017
Potluck Celebration Saturday 6/3
Other News
Join us for the first potluck meal of the season on Saturday June 3rd 6-8pm (rain date TBD). Bring a dish to share that can feed approximately 4-6 adults, your own place settings, and a beverage. We will eat and have a happy time!
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
May 28, 2017
Easy CSA Information
Other News
  • Notify the farmers via e-mail (anchorruncsa@gmail.com) by 5pm the Sunday prior to your pick up week to SWITCH YOUR PICK UP DAY
  • Pick up is 1-8pm Monday, 1-8pm Thursday, and 10am-12noon Saturday. You're assigned one of those days and Week A or Week B if you're a Half Share.
  • Let us know via e-mail if you miss your pick up and wish to be rescheduled.
  • U-pick is available 8am-8pm Monday through Sunday of your pick up week. Allotments are specified on the U-pick board in the pick up room.
  • Bring bags and scissors with you when you collect your produce from the farm.
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
May 28, 2017
Workshifts Scheduled for Week of 5/28/17
Other News
Workshifts this week:
Wednesday 5/31 10am-12noon
Wednesday 5/31 6-8pm
Friday 6/2 10am-12noon
Sunday 6/4 10am-12noon
Workshift sign-up instructions may be found here.
Thank you!
Flowering peas will soon grow into sweet and succulent pods and will eventually be available for u-pick, if not later this week then probably Harvest Week #4. Snow peas will be available first, then snap peas. Yum and hooray!
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
May 28, 2017
"Now What!?" Workshops
Other News
Bok Ch-huh? Mizun-a-what?
"Now What!?" Workshops Saturday, June 10th 1-3 PM, and Saturday, June 24th 1-3 PM
Is your experience with kale limited to “the thing you put in your smoothies” or “the chips you buy at the market”? Are you excited, but overwhelmed, by your share of greens?
Being a CSA member means you receive some produce you would, most likely, not purchase at the market (if it was even available!). What a stupendous adventure! But opening your refrigerator door and being greeted by a wall of greens can be intimidating! No worries. We have got you covered!
Please try to attend at least one of our two “Now What!?" workshops scheduled on Saturday, June 10th, and Saturday, June 24th, from 1 PM until 3 PM. We will talk about storage techniques, recipe resources and how to incorporate your share into your family’s diet. Bring your questions and share your ideas! Because the topics discussed are driven from the questions and comments of those attending, different topics will be discussed at each workshop. How exciting - right!? This is for new and returning members. Returning members always bring wonderful insight and a different perspective.
Please join us and experience a small part of the community aspect of your CSA membership!
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
May 21, 2017
Workshifts Scheduled for Week of 5/21/17
Other News
By Derek McGeehan
Workshifts this week:
Friday 5/26 10am-12noon
Sunday 5/28 10am-12noon
Due to the wet forecast midweek workshifts are not being scheduled at this time.
Workshift sign-up instructions may be found here.
Thank you!
Other helpers on the farm include american toads, eaters of slugs, and barn swallows, eaters of insects.
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
May 21, 2017
Ticks: Awareness and How to Deal
Other News
A bumper year for ticks following a bumper year for mice (per NPR) means education and awareness when in nature to understand the problem and deal with it in a reasonable way.
I'm going to assume that everyone has seen and felt a tick crawling on them and is familiar enough with their appearance to identify them as well as the difference between a dog and deer tick, the two types found in our area. On the farm, 95% of the time I see a tick it is a dog tick, the bigger one, the one you can feel crawling on your skin and see in the mirror quite easily. Since we're in tick habitat daily on the farm we have a routine where we check ourselves nightly before bed, very thoroughly. We do find ticks occasionally, most of the time before they've fed or when they've just attached. At this point it is not a big deal. However, very rarely Dana will find a deer tick feeding on herself (they don't like me for some reason) and we'll very carefully remove it, head and all, with tweezers and ship it to a lab to be analyzed to see if it is carrying lyme. Five times out of five now the results have come back negative for lyme so she doesn't have to go on antibiotics. Each time we've found them they've also only been feeding a short period of time. How long do ticks need to feed to transmit lyme? Not sure if there is a consensus on this since lyme seems to remain a mystery for some reason, but I've heard 24 hours, which doesn't sound accurate. I've also heard from veterinarians and doctors that if you've been bitten by a deer tick and it is carrying lyme to automatically go on the minimal antibiotic dosage (which is 2 weeks of doxycyline, tough on the body but better than untreated lyme).
So, the moral of the story is this: after being on the farm, either before you get in the car or when you get home, or before bed at night, check yourselves and your kids for ticks. It is a good habit to get into and really enhances the nighttime routine.
If you find a tick feeding on you, pull it out, head too, and send it hear to be analyzed: UMass Amherst
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
May 21, 2017
First of the Season - Greens!
Other News
By Linda Dansbury
Welcome to new members and welcome back returning members! I am the Recipe Coordinator - which means that I am here to help you enjoy the beautiful and plentiful veggies from Anchor Run Farm. There are tons of recipes on the internet for each veggie we receive. What I do is find and create recipes that often incorporate more than one of the crops in a single recipe and that for the most part are seasonal at the same time so that we can eat as close to a "local diet" as possible. I also welcome all of you out there to share with membership what you do with your harvest by sending it to me at lindadansbury@comcast.net. I will share with fellow members in the newsletters.
Green garlic is a new offering for Anchor Run Farm and for me it is a very welcomed item. Green garlic is an immature garlic plant. Garlic bulbs are planted in the fall before the first frost where it begins growing roots. In the spring it starts to grow vigorously, putting up green stalks that look similar to scallions and leeks. Green garlic is much milder and sweeter than mature garlic and so should not be cooked for long periods because the subtle flavors will be lost. Pestos, stir fries, dips, salad dressings or added near the end of long cooking recipes all work well.
Field Manager Hannah holds a bundle of green garlic.
You may or may not be familiar with mizuna. In the stores it is often mixed with other greens and labeled as something like "spring mix". The mizuna we just received is very tender and mild. Although it can be sauteed or added to soups and stews, I like to mix it in with other greens in salads. It adds a nice taste, texture and visual complement to other greens in a salad.
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
May 14, 2017
Some Pick Up Info
Other News
Full Shares, Medium Shares, and Week A Half Shares pick up this week; Week B Half Shares will begin picking up next week, the week of Sunday May 21st.
When you signed up for your share you selected a pick up day to retrieve your share, either Monday 1-8pm, Thursday 1-8pm, or Saturday 10am-12noon.
The u-pick portion of your share can be collected 8am-8pm Monday-Sunday of your pick up week. Allotments for the farmer harvested share and u-pick portion will be specified in the pick up room. Staff will be available in the pick up room to assist new members. **There may not be any u-pick during the first couple weeks of pick up.**
**To find your balance and/or your pick up day and week Log In to the website. It is very important that you come on your correct and assigned pick up day since we harvest specific amounts for the number of members coming on that day. Sign in sheets are provided by the pick up room when you arrive to collect your share.**
If you need to temporarily switch your pick up day please let us know by 5pm Sunday prior to your pick up week. If you need to make a permanent day switch please let us know as soon as possible.
american bullfrog in the upper pond at Anchor Run Farm
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
April 30, 2017
CSA Orientation and Open House May 7th!
Other News
When -- Sunday May 7th, 10:00 AM - 2:00 PM
Where -- Anchor Run Farm 2578 2nd Street Pike, Wrightstown, PA 18940. Parking is available on site in a large stone lot at the end of the driveway. Importantly, please drive slowly in and out of the farm, there will be plenty of kids, adults, cats, and maybe a dog or two (on a leash) wandering around.
Who Should Attend -- New members who would like to check out the farm and learn more about how our CSA works before the harvest season starts. Returning members who want to spend time with their food community.
Why -- We'll be hosting field tours and pick-up room tours complete with ample time for Q&A sessions with the farmers and the core group members. See what your food looks like before it reaches your kitchen, where your 'u-pick' crops will be this year as well as how the pick-up room and workshifts function. There will be some snacks and light refreshments under the pavilion. So come on out and meet your farmers, mingle with the farm community, and enjoy some long awaited spring excitement!
Schedule of Events -- Field tours on the hour at 10:00am, 11:00am, 12:00pm, and 1:00pm. Pick-up room tours on the half hour at 10:30am, 11:30am, 12:30pm, and 1:30pm. The Q&A and light refreshments are all on-going.
Can't Make It? - Don't worry; staff or volunteers will be present in the pick-up room for the first two weeks of distribution to help guide new members.
New for us: growing onions in white plastic under hoops and row cover. Why: the white plastic suppresses weeds, is a deterrent to some onion pests, and remains cooler than black plastic. The row cover is used as a barrier to keep the newly arrived allium minor pest away during its spring flight period. We're hopeful that all of this extra effort pays off in higher yields.
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
April 30, 2017
Ledamete Grass Farm's Pastured Meat CSA
Other News
Would you like to eat the BEST organically-raised and pastured chicken, pork, and beef? Ledamete Grass Farm offers a chicken and also a pork share with pick up at our farm. Each month over the course of our season they'll also set up a monthly market stand, but there are discounts for joining their CSA. Drop offs for their meat CSA also occur once a month for 6 months. For more information and to sign up follow this link to their website.
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
April 30, 2017
Pertinent CSA Information
Other News
- A $200 deposit is due when you sign up to secure your share (also confirms your interest)
- CSA share balance is due by May 1st - Log in to check your balance. If you've only just joined and submitted your deposit, please remit the balance by the middle of May if possible.
- Work hour opportunities will begin soon. Look for an e-mail from us announcing a schedule. We normally spend a lot of time in April cleaning up the strawberry and carrot patches, but this year the strawberry patch is almost perfectly weed free and the carrots are a little behind schedule due to the wet weather.
- CSA pick up will probably begin Monday May 22nd, depending on the weather over the next few weeks. When you signed up for your share you selected a pick-up day; log in to check your selection if you've forgotten. If you're a half share owner and are a returning member you'll have the same pick up week as last year; if you're a new half share owner you'll be assigned Week A or Week B before the season begins. Log in to check your week, too.
The garlic patch looks great this year and didn't mind all of the moisture!
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
March 31, 2017
Wild For Salmon Buying Club Order
Other News
We're once again partnering with local fishermen, fishing family, fishing company Wild For Salmon, who trek to Alaska each summer to participate in the sustainable salmon catch in Bristol Bay. They also sell other Alaskan fish, shellfish, and other aquatic products.
For more information and to place your order, please follow this link. The fish is amazing!
Orders are due by 11pm Sunday 4/23 and are scheduled to be picked up at the farm on Wednesday 4/26 10am-12noon. If you cannot pick up during this timeframe please contact us at anchorruncsa@gmail.com to coordinate an alternate pick up time.
If you have any questions about ordering or their products please contact info@wildforsalmon.com
Fisherfolk Steve and Jenn on their boat in Alaska
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
March 31, 2017
CSA Information and Reminders
Other News
- A $200 deposit is due when you sign up to secure your share (also confirms your interest)
- CSA share balance is due by May 1st - Log in to check your balance
- CSA Open House and New Member Orientation 10am-2pm Sunday May 7th with field/u-pick and barn/pick-up tours on the hour and half hour, respectively, with a total of 4 tours of each (so you only really need to hang out for about an hour; more information will follow)
- Work hour opportunities will probably begin in mid-April. Look for an e-mail from us announcing a schedule.
- CSA pick up will probably begin either Monday May 15th or Monday May 22nd, depending on the spring weather. When you signed up for your share you selected a pick-up day; log in to check your selection if you've forgotten. If you're a half share owner and are a returning member you'll have the same pick up week as last year; if you're a new half share owner you'll be assigned Week A or Week B before the season begins. Log in to check your week, too.
Field Manager/Crew Leader Hannah, her mom Becky, and farm dog Borchie brainstorm and assess new flower garden and CSA member habitat outside of pick up room.
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
February 20, 2017
Late Fall and Winter Survey
Other News
Help us improve our/your Late Fall and Winter CSAs by filling out this very brief survey which can be found here.
Springtime in February, temperatures in the 60s, warm sun, bare feet, and mud.
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
February 12, 2017
Thank You For Your Support!
Other News
"THANK YOU Winter CSA members for supporting us during our inaugural January and February share! Much appreciation and love from Hannah, Dana, Abigail, Derek, and Gabriel."
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
February 5, 2017
Celeriac Fries
Other News
This was passed along by Winter CSA member Lori Bittner-Barnaby: Celeriac Fries
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
February 5, 2017
Sign Up For 2017 Main Season And Help Us Plan For Membership Numbers
Other News
Log in to the website to purchase your Main Season summer share and mail your $200 deposit to secure your spot. Thank you for your continued support! Spread the good word to other past, present, and future members!
Interested in helping promote our CSA by hanging the above flyer around your community? Let us know!
We can look forward to fresh snow and snap peas in spring 2017 (this scene is from 2016).
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
January 29, 2017
Sign Up For 2017 Main Season And Help Us Plan For Membership Numbers
Other News
Log in to the website to purchase your Main Season share and mail your $200 deposit to secure your spot. Thank you for your continued support! Spread the good word to other past, present, and future members!
This share was distributed at the end of July 2016.
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
January 22, 2017
Sign Up For 2017 Main Season And Help Us Plan For Membership Numbers
Other News
Log in to the website to purchase your Main Season share and mail your $200 deposit to secure your spot. Thank you for your continued support!
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
December 18, 2016
Sign Up for the Winter CSA
Other News
By Derek McGeehan
This is the final pick up week for the Late Fall CSA.
The Winter CSA begins on Wednesday January 4th and runs for 8 weeks until the end of February. We're aiming for Winter CSA harvests to contain a nice mixture of fresh greens and storage crops, similar to what you've been receiving in the Late Fall shares.
The 2017 Main Season will begin in mid-May and will run for 26 weeks again. We're anticipating another great harvest season and are excited to implement more positive changes to further improve your farm and food experience.
A cold winter's day on the farm
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
December 11, 2016
Sign Up for 2017 Winter CSA and 2017 Main Season CSA
Other News
By Derek McGeehan
Including this one, there are two more weeks of pick up for the Late Fall CSA. The last day to pick up is Wednesday 12/21 and Saturday 12/24. The Winter CSA begins on Wednesday January 4th and runs for 8 weeks until the end of February. We're aiming for Winter CSA harvests to contain a nice mixture of fresh greens and storage crops, similar to what you've been receiving in the Late Fall shares.
The 2017 Main Season will begin in mid-May and will run for 26 weeks again. We're anticipating another great harvest season and are excited to implement more positive changes to further improve your farm and food experience.
A cold, cloudy, wintry day on the farm, preparing for impending temperature dips, protecting cold-tolerant crops with hoops and row cover, and harvesting more sensitive ones.
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
December 4, 2016
Sign Up for 2017 Winter CSA and 2017 Main Season CSA
Other News
By Derek McGeehan
Including this one, there are three more weeks of pick up for the Late Fall CSA. The last day to pick up is Wednesday 12/21 and Saturday 12/24. The Winter CSA begins on Wednesday January 4th and runs for 8 weeks until the end of February. We're aiming for Winter CSA harvests to contain a nice mixture of fresh greens and storage crops, similar to what you've been receiving in the Late Fall shares.
The 2017 Main Season will begin in mid-May and will run for 26 weeks again. We're anticipating another great harvest season and are excited to implement more positive changes to further improve your farm and food experience.
Farm dog Borchie faces south toward the warmth of the morning sun and reminds you to sign up soon for the future CSA seasons!
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
November 20, 2016
A Note on Cauliflower
Other News
By Linda Dansbury
If you find you have a lot of cauliflower, and are not sure what to do with it, consider how many options you have: raw as a snack, steamed or boiled till desired tenderness, made into a soup, boiled until soft and then mash it as you would potatoes, and roasted. Here is an easy way to roast your caulifower for a delicious side dish:
Heat oven to 400 degrees. Slice or cut cauliflower into pieces larger than bite sized - the more surface area you have on the sheet pan, the better. Slice a garlic clove or 2 and toss it along with the cauliflower in some olive oil - salt and pepper and thyme if desired. Roast, turning occassionly until not quite tender. Take out of the oven and sprinkle with some grated parmesan cheese. Return to the oven until cauliflower is tender and cheese is melted. Enjoy!
Hey, that's a nice head of cauliflower (next to a quart container for perspective).
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
November 6, 2016
Endive, Escarole, Radicchio - AKA Chicory
Other News
By Linda Dansbury
While in the pick up room this past week, we had a discussion about endive, which was beautifully sitting in its bin, waiting to be picked up. A member asked how to use it because she finds it just too bitter to eat. Derek and I both starting waxing poetic about how much we love this green - he puts 2 heads into his and Dana's smoothies each day - the smoothie mixture overcomes the bitterness and it is delicious - he also said it is a great liver detoxifier - sounds like a great reason to gobble it up just for that!
Both endive and escarole are bitter when eaten raw, on their own. But both are equally happy when mixed with other things and/or when cooked, which makes them much milder tasting.
My German grandmother used to make endive salads - she would soak the endive in warm water to remove some of the bitterness. She would make a dressing of lemon juice, a mild oil, celery salt and pepper - and she would sprinkle some fresh chopped parsley over the top. It was especially delicious with rich foods, such as beef stew - or turkey!
Escarole, endive's close cousin, is what was traditionally used in Italian Wedding Soup - growing up, my Italian grandmother called it Escarole Soup.
Both endive and escarole can be cooked in a pan with olive oil, garlic and a sliced hot pepper (from your freezer, remember?) or red pepper flakes, like many of you have done with many of the other greens. Or, add them to your soups and stews for added nutrients and color.
Embrace these 2 versatile, nutritious greens!
Not too bitter for this praying mantis, radicchio is a truly appealing vegetable.
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
November 6, 2016
Sign Up Now For Extended CSA Seasons!
Other News
By Derek McGeehan
It's time to sign up for our 5th annual Late Fall CSA as well as our inaugural Winter CSA to receive your supply of fresh, local, and organic produce through the dark winter months!
Enrollment in these seasons is limited and will be filled on a first-come first-serve basis.
To participate in these seasons, please Log in to the website and click the green 'Join' buttons on the left hand side of your member page.
2016 Late Fall CSA:
  • 6 weeks of fresh and storage crops from weeks 11/13/16 through 12/18/16
  • weekly full shares ($180) and biweekly half shares ($100) available
  • share distribution on Wednesdays 1-8pm (except for Tuesday 11/22/16) and Saturdays 11am-12noon
  • should include a variety of crops like beets, potatoes, radishes, turnips, sweet potatoes, leeks, garlic, scallions, lettuce, radicchio, cabbage, napa cabbage, arugula, mizuna, mustard greens, kale, collards, chard, spinach, herbs, etc.
2017 Winter CSA:
  • 8 weeks of fresh and storage crops from weeks 1/1/17 through 2/19/17
  • weekly full shares ($240) and biweekly half shares ($130) available
  • share distribution on Wednesdays 1-8pm and Saturdays 11am-12noon
  • should include a variety of crops like beets, potatoes, radishes, turnips, sweet potatoes, leeks, garlic, scallions, lettuce, cabbage, napa cabbage, arugula, mizuna, mustard greens, kale, collards, chard, spinach, herbs, etc.
Found inside our optionally heated greenhouse, this praying mantis is welcoming you to participate in the extended CSA seasons.
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
November 6, 2016
Workshifts For Week of 11/6 - GARLIC!
Other News
By Derek McGeehan
It's garlic planting and mulching time! This is the final crop we'll be planting outside this year, and we won't harvest it until July 2017. Three hundred pounds of cloves will be planted 6 inches apart in 3 rows over eleven 180-foot beds. How many cloves is that? 11,880. After we plant the garlic we'll mulch it with straw to protect and insulate the soil over the winter months and smother weeds come spring and summer.
Workshift sign-up instructions may be found here.
Shifts:
Tuesday 11/8 9:15-11:15am & 1-3pm
Wednesday 11/9 10am-12noon & 1-3pm
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
October 30, 2016
Greens, Greens and yes, More Greens
Other News
By Linda Dansbury
After the many years I have been a member of Anchor Run, I am still learning so much about eating locally and how to best enjoy the harvests.
This week I focused on catching up on my harvests and using greens - which took some time but it was fun making the large pots of soup and filling my freezer with easy meals for dark, cold winter nights.
As I have said many times, greens are interchangeable, so if a recipe calls for kale, but you have chard, that's fine. Add mizuna, endive, escarole to any soup or stew to boost the nutrition, and add color to the pot.
I really love receiving the chicories: endive, escarole, radicchio because they are equally happy in a salad or cooked.
I usually do a mix of greens for salads - in the fall and winter, a mix of endive, escarole, mizuna, leaf lettuce with your favorite vinaigrette is delicious - these heartier, slightly bitter greens are delicious with "add-ins" - they welcome the sweetness of thinly sliced local apples or pears, dried cranberries, pomegranate arils, and nuts such as almonds and pecans. A crumble of feta or blue cheese on these salads is also delicious - with a salad that is this large and loaded with flavor, I often just have this with a simply prepared piece of meat.
Enjoy your greens!
Frosted greens slowly warming up in the morning sunshine.
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
October 30, 2016
Ledamete's Turkey and Stocking Up Sale!
Other News
Ledamete Grass Farm
Thanksgiving is quickly approaching and we're sure to sell out! Reserve your turkey today to be sure we have one for you.
We'll have a "Stock Up" Market in conjunction with our turkey pick up on Nov. 22nd 4-7pm so you can be sure to enjoy our pastured chicken, forest & pasture-raised pork, and 100% grassfed beef all winter long!
Click here for a full inventory listing and to order. Available for purchase now:
Pasture & Forest-Raised Pork
Pastured Poultry
100% Grassfed Beef
STOCKING UP ORDER DEADLINE- MIDNIGHT ON NOVEMBER 2ND!
Turkey & Stocking Up Market Date: Tuesday, Nov. 22nd from 4-7pm * Pre-orders ONLY!
Want to see what we are up to day to day on the farm? Follow us on Facebook!
Your Farmers,
The Fix Family
5471 Sell Rd.
Schnecksville, PA 18078
ledametegrassfarm.com
farmers@ledametegrassfarm.com
610-767-4984
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
October 30, 2016
Sign Up for Extended Seasons - Saturday Pick Up Added
Other News
By Derek McGeehan
It's time to sign up for our 5th annual Late Fall CSA as well as our inaugural Winter CSA to receive your supply of fresh, local, and organic produce through the dark winter months!
Enrollment in these seasons is limited and will be filled on a first-come first-serve basis. Current Main Season CSA shareholders will be given priority until November 1, 2016, when the general public will be able to enroll. We want to fill these CSA seasons with our current members but need to reach a critical mass for these seasons to run successfully.
To participate in these seasons, please Log in to the website and click the green 'Join' buttons on the left hand side of your member page.
2016 Late Fall CSA:
  • 6 weeks of fresh and storage crops from weeks 11/13/16 through 12/18/16
  • weekly full shares ($180) and biweekly half shares ($100) available
  • share distribution on Wednesdays 1-8pm (except for Tuesday 11/22/16) and Saturdays 11am-12noon
  • should include a variety of crops like beets, potatoes, radishes, turnips, sweet potatoes, leeks, garlic, scallions, lettuce, radicchio, cabbage, napa cabbage, arugula, mizuna, mustard greens, kale, collards, chard, spinach, herbs, etc.
2017 Winter CSA:
  • 8 weeks of fresh and storage crops from weeks 1/1/17 through 2/19/17
  • weekly full shares ($240) and biweekly half shares ($130) available
  • share distribution on Wednesdays 1-8pm and Saturdays 11am-12noon
  • should include a variety of crops like beets, potatoes, radishes, turnips, sweet potatoes, leeks, garlic, scallions, lettuce, cabbage, napa cabbage, arugula, mizuna, mustard greens, kale, collards, chard, spinach, herbs, etc.
An uplifting mix of vegetable crops will nourish us through the cold months!
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
October 30, 2016
Workshifts For Week of 10/30
Other News
By Derek McGeehan
Wow, so now that we're almost in November there are only a few more farm tasks that we'll need some help with. If you're not planning to work this season, please remit the balance of your share cost soon (shares are discounted when you help us on the farm). Half shares work 4 hours, full shares work 8 hours, over the course of the entire season. To "buy-out" of your work hours at $15/hour, please send a check payable to "Anchor Run CSA" at 2578 2nd Street Pike, Wrightstown, PA 18940. Please don't feel guilty about this option!
As of now no workshifts are scheduled for this week.
Workshift sign-up instructions may be found here.
Thank you!
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
October 23, 2016
The sweets, and other things are here!
Other News
By Linda Dansbury
Sweet potatoes are here! Proper storage is important for keeping sweets for any period of time. Sweet potatoes should never be stored in the fridge - the low temps cause cellular changes which effects both cooking and taste of the potatoes. They prefer to be stored at a temp range of 55-60 degrees, which is difficult to maintain. If you have a basement or garage, they are probably the best bet, although when temps really start to drop they will need to be moved inside from the garage. They also like it dark, so if you want to try and store them for any real length of time, wrap them individually in newspaper and then place in a bag or box. I have read that placing an apple in the box/bag keeps the potatoes from sprouting, but I have never tried this myself. Do not try to store the potatoes with bad bruises or open cuts - cook those immediately.
Sweets are delicious roasted - I love to do a mixed roast of the various items we receive this time of year: potatoes, leeks, sweets, celeriac, turnips, winter squash, kohlrabi. They also are delicious boiled and mashed, either alone or in combination with potatoes and celeriac.
Celeriac is a little known and under appreciated veggie, maybe because it looks a little intimidating. It is delicious both raw and cooked. They are able to store for long periods of time in plastic in the fridge. The main thing is to be careful when peeling them (however Derek and Dana don't peel them). Cut a bit off each end and then sit it on the cutting board and with a sharp knife slice/peel down the sides, trying not to take much of the flesh. Then slice or chopped as desired. There are several recipes on this site, including Celeriac Remoulade and Celeriac and Potato/Leek Puree.
Napa cabbage - We have been receiving different cabbages over the past several weeks - have you wondered what the differences are and if they are interchangeable? The "regular" green/red, round cabbage with the smooth leaves is the strongest tasting and takes the longest to cook to get to be tender, if you are going that route vs using in a slaw. The next one is savoy, which is also round, but with pretty, crinkled leaves. It is less strong and cooks a bit faster than green/red cabbage. Napa is the mildest and fastest cooking of the 3 and is the choice for stir fries and other Asian dishes. They all store very well when in plastic in the fridge.
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
October 23, 2016
Sign Up For 2016 Late Fall and 2017 Winter CSAs
Other News
By Derek McGeehan
It's time to sign up for our 5th annual Late Fall CSA as well as our inaugural Winter CSA to receive your supply of local and organic produce through the dark winter months!
Enrollment in these seasons is limited and will be filled on a first-come first-serve basis. Current Main Season CSA shareholders will be given priority until November 1, 2016, when the general public will be able to enroll. We want to fill these CSA seasons with our current members but need to reach a critical mass for these seasons to run successfully.
Also, we're currently re-evaluating the best pick up day/time for Fall and Winter seasons, so please let us know if our proposed schedule does not work for you. See below for details!
To participate in these seasons, please Log in to the website and click the green 'Join' buttons on the left hand side of your member page.
We're currently filling up our protective hoop house, high tunnel, and greenhouse with lettuce mix, arugula, kale, spinach, scallions, chard, mizuna, and mustard mix to ensure a steady supply of fresh greens through the winter! Beat the cold and flu season by eating the nutritionally beneficial crops that we grow!
2016 Late Fall CSA:
  • 6 weeks of fresh and storage crops from weeks 11/13/16 through 12/18/16
  • weekly full shares ($180) and biweekly half shares ($100) available
  • share distribution on Wednesdays 1-8pm (except for Tuesday 11/22/16)
  • should include a variety of crops like beets, potatoes, radishes, turnips, sweet potatoes, leeks, garlic, scallions, lettuce, radicchio, cabbage, napa cabbage, arugula, mizuna, mustard greens, kale, collards, chard, spinach, herbs, etc.
2017 Winter CSA:
  • 8 weeks of fresh and storage crops from weeks 1/1/17 through 2/19/17
  • weekly full shares ($240) and biweekly half shares ($130) available
  • share distribution on Wednesdays 1-8pm
  • should include a variety of crops like beets, potatoes, radishes, turnips, sweet potatoes, leeks, garlic, scallions, lettuce, cabbage, napa cabbage, arugula, mizuna, mustard greens, kale, collards, chard, spinach, herbs, etc.
A Bucks County farm scene - courtesy of Mary Liz - with late-fall kale, collards, scallions, arugula, radishes, lettuces, and mustard mix accentuating the mid-fall golden deciduous leaves.
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
October 16, 2016
Sign Up For 2016 Late Fall and 2017 Winter CSAs
Other News
By Derek McGeehan
Sign up now on the members' page to secure your spot in our 2016 Late Fall CSA and 2017 Winter CSA!
To run these seasons successfully we need to reach a critical mass of membership. As of now registration is only available to current 2016 Main Season members (i.e. you) and soon we'll open it up to the general public if we don't reach our goals (we want to reach these goals with you included).
We cap these seasons at about 25% of the Main Season membership size so please sign up to reserve your spot today!
Also, we're currently re-evaluating the best pick up day/time for Fall and Winter seasons, so please let us know if our proposed schedule does not work for you. The Late Fall CSA typically mimics one Main Season pick-up-days worth of members, about 100-120 shareholders, so we're okay with keeping a 1-8pm pick up window on Wednesdays. However, January and February being more difficult weather months and the fact that we're using this season experimentally and keeping membership numbers lower, we're probably going to move the Winter CSA pick up to Saturday daytime. Please give us some feedback if you wish!
2016 Late Fall CSA:
  • 6 weeks of fresh and storage crops from weeks 11/13/16 through 12/18/16
  • vegetables should include greens like arugula, spinach, mizuna, kale, collards, cabbage, napa cabbage, endive, escarole, lettuce, chard, and beet greens; roots like carrots, turnips, beets, radishes, potatoes, sweet potatoes, and kohlrabi; storage crops like onions and garlic; and freshly harvested alliums like chives, leeks, and scallions
  • cold hardy vegetables grown outside with use of low hoops and row cover
  • weekly full shares ($180) and biweekly half shares ($100) available
  • share distribution on Wednesdays 1-8pm (except for Tuesday 11/22/16)
2017 Winter CSA:
  • 8 weeks of fresh and storage crops from weeks 1/1/17 through 2/19/17
  • vegetables should include greens like arugula, spinach, mizuna, kale, collards, cabbage, napa cabbage, lettuce mix, chard, and beet greens; roots like carrots, turnips, beets, radishes, potatoes, sweet potatoes, and kohlrabi; storage crops like onions and garlic; and freshly harvested alliums like chives, leeks, and scallions
  • cold hardy vegetables grown inside of hoop house, high tunnel, and greenhouse
  • weekly full shares ($240) and biweekly half shares ($130) available
  • share distribution on Wednesdays 1-8pm (this may change to Saturday daytime)
The final pass with the tractor and raised bed maker will make a nice home for winter greens like kale and arugula. Shortly after this shot was taken we moved the high tunnel one position downhill to protect the soon-to-be-sown greens for the winter. It protected the heirloom tomatoes over the summer.
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
October 16, 2016
Ledamete Grass Farm's Monthly Market October 20, preorder now!
Other News
Ledamete Grass Farm
Ledamete Grass Farm will be at Anchor Run Farm for a market day on Thursday, October 20 from 1-5pm*!
*If you can't make that day/time, pre-orders can be left in the freezer for you to pick up on your next share day (you have 2 weeks to pick it up).
Order Your Pastured Meats Today- Deadline Midnight October 19!
100% Grassfed Beef
Pasture & Forest Raised Pork
Pastured Chicken
PRE-ORDERS preferred but day of sales will be welcomed.
To learn more about our farming practices, read below, visit our website, and check us out on Facebook. . To order visit our e-commerce site here.
Ledamete Grass Farm Pasture & Forest-Raised Pork
We raise Tamworth cross heritage breed pigs, as they thrive in the forest and field and are known for their excellent flavor. In addition to forage, our pigs are fed local grain raised with organic methods, organic veggie compost, and grass-fed raw dairy products.
Ledamete Grass Farm Pastured Poultry
Our chickens and turkeys are raised on pasture with constant access to fresh bugs, herbs and grasses. In addition to the forage they find, we provide our birds with grain, grown and milled fresh by a local farmer who utilizes organic methods. The birds' access to fresh air, exercise, sunshine, green grass and bugs creates very delicious and nutritious meat!
Ledamete Grass Farm 100% Grassfed Beef
We raise Rotakawa Devon/Jersey Cross beef as they do very well on 100% grass. This meat is nutrient dense and delicious!
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
October 16, 2016
Workshifts For Week of 10/16
Other News
By Derek McGeehan
Now that we're into October there is about one month left of workshift opportunities for you to satisfy the work component of your CSA share. If you're not planning to work this season, please remit the balance of your share cost soon. Half shares work 4 hours, full shares work 8 hours, over the course of the entire season. To "buy-out" of your work hours at $15/hour, please send a check payable to "Anchor Run CSA" at 2578 2nd Street Pike, Wrightstown, PA 18940. Please don't feel guilty about this option!
Shifts this week:
Tuesday 10/18 9-11am
Wednesday 10/19 10am-12noon
Friday 10/21 10am-12noon
Saturday 10/22 10am-12noon
Sunday 10/23 12noon-2pm (garlic processing in barn)
Workshift sign-up instructions may be found here.
Thank you!
Notoriously slow to germinate and grow, baby carrots are difficult to cultivate because weeds easily outpace them. Here, Hannah is confirming their presence in their respective rows and will cultivate between rows.
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
October 9, 2016
Fall abundance
Other News
By Linda Dansbury
Two things really hit me as I sat to write this morning. Each week, Derek emails me with the expected harvest for the week. He titles the email with what pick up week it is. I was startled by the fact that it is already week 22 - it seems like such a short time ago that it was week 1! The other thing that jumped out at me is the incredible variety of veggies that are available to us at this time of year. We are fortunate to live in a climate that supports the many diverse crops it does and even luckier that we have amazing farmers that care as much a D&D and their farm staff about growing such nourishing food for us!
For ideas on how to use this variety, search this site - I still do and even if I don't select a specific recipe, I get ideas for using the veggies.
A couple notes about cabbage. First, it keeps very well when stored in a plastic bag or container in the fridge meaning that you don't need to use it within the first couple of days of picking up your share.
Cabbage is of course delicious in slaws - my family and friends love my Asian Slaw recipe. Cabbage is also delicious when cooked - check out the site, but I used cabbage in a way that doesn't require a recipe: Chop/slice it as you would for cole slaw. Melt a little butter and olive oil together and when heated, add the cabbage and saute it over med heat until it is tender and slightly browned - keep a fairly close watch, as it can burn easily. Simply salt and pepper to taste and sprinkle with fresh herb(s) such as chives, parsley and/or thyme. When cooked like this it takes on an almost sweet, nutty taste. It goes really well with pork and chicken.
We are back to receiving a lot of greens - embrace it and add them to many of the dishes that you cook - don't worry if the recipe doesn't call for them: soups, stews, chili. Saute a single green or combo with garlic, onion, a hot pepper. Add other things to suit your family's taste. Keep the tops to turnips, beets, radishes to add to all these dishes - I was amazed last night to see that I have really kept up with using my greens, even though for the most part I am only cooking for the 2 of us.
Enjoy the Abundance!
Well now who can resist a colorful photograph featuring a monarch butterfly snacking on New England aster nectar? Thanks to Mary Liz for the photo.
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
October 9, 2016
Sign Up For 2016 Late Fall and 2017 Winter CSAs
Other News
By Derek McGeehan
Sign up now on the members' page to secure your spot in our 2016 Late Fall CSA and 2017 Winter CSA! For additional information please see the bulletin that was e-mailed to you this past week, log into the website and click the green "Join" buttons on the members' page, or look below.
2016 Late Fall CSA:
  • 6 weeks of fresh and storage crops from weeks 11/13/16 through 12/18/16
  • vegetables should include greens like arugula, spinach, mizuna, kale, collards, cabbage, napa cabbage, endive, escarole, lettuce, chard, and beet greens; roots like carrots, turnips, beets, radishes, potatoes, sweet potatoes, and kohlrabi; storage crops like onions and garlic; and freshly harvested alliums like chives, leeks, and scallions
  • cold hardy vegetables grown outside with use of low hoops and row cover
  • weekly full shares ($180) and biweekly half shares ($100) available
  • share distribution on Wednesdays 1-8pm (except for Tuesday 11/22/16)
2017 Winter CSA:
  • 8 weeks of fresh and storage crops from weeks 1/1/17 through 2/19/17
  • vegetables should include greens like arugula, spinach, mizuna, kale, collards, cabbage, napa cabbage, lettuce mix, chard, and beet greens; roots like carrots, turnips, beets, radishes, potatoes, sweet potatoes, and kohlrabi; storage crops like onions and garlic; and freshly harvested alliums like chives, leeks, and scallions
  • cold hardy vegetables grown inside of hoop house, high tunnel, and greenhouse
  • weekly full shares ($240) and biweekly half shares ($130) available
  • share distribution on Wednesdays 1-8pm
A site for Late Fall and Winter growing, the lettuce mix, spinach, scallions, and chard will probably end up calling the raised beds uphill home.
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
October 2, 2016
2016 Late Fall CSA; 2017 Winter CSA
Other News
Sign up now on the members' page to secure your spot in our 2016 Late Fall CSA and 2017 Winter CSA! For additional information please see the bulletin that was e-mailed to you this past week, log into the website and click the green "Join" buttons on the members' page, or look below.
2016 Late Fall CSA:
  • 6 weeks of fresh and storage crops from weeks 11/13/16 through 12/18/16
  • vegetables should include greens like arugula, spinach, mizuna, kale, collards, cabbage, napa cabbage, endive, escarole, lettuce, chard, and beet greens; roots like carrots, turnips, beets, radishes, potatoes, sweet potatoes, and kohlrabi; as well as storage crops like onions, garlic, and butternut; and freshly harvested alliums like chives, leeks, and scallions
  • cold hardy vegetables grown outside with use of low hoops and row cover
  • weekly full shares ($180) and biweekly half shares ($100) available
  • share distribution on Wednesdays 1-8pm (except for Tuesday 11/22/16)
2017 Winter CSA:
  • 8 weeks of fresh and storage crops from weeks 1/1/17 through 2/19/17
  • vegetables should include greens like arugula, spinach, mizuna, kale, collards, cabbage, napa cabbage, lettuce mix, chard, and beet greens; roots like carrots, turnips, beets, radishes, potatoes, sweet potatoes, and kohlrabi; as well as storage crops like onions, garlic, and butternut; and freshly harvested alliums like chives, leeks, and scallions
  • cold hardy vegetables grown inside of hoop house, high tunnel, and greenhouse
  • weekly full shares ($240) and biweekly half shares ($130) available
  • share distribution on Wednesdays 1-8pm
A variety of fall and winter roots are looking healthy above and below ground. Traditionally we remove their tops for distribution and storage. Left to right: scarlet queen red stem, des vertus marteau, and purple top turnips; alpine daikon, watermelon, bravo daikon, and green meat radishes.
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
October 2, 2016
Potluck Meal and Celebration - Sat. 10/8 5pm
Other News
Join us in celebration of the delightful arrival of autumn with a final potluck of the 2016 season on Saturday October 8th at 5pm. Bring a dish to share to feed around 6 adults plus your own place settings and beverages. We'll eat under the pavilion, enjoy the night sky and a small fire.
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
September 25, 2016
Greens and Green Tomatoes
Other News
By Linda Dansbury
The warm temperatures have the greens in the field growing rapidly and begging to be harvested, so there will be a volume of greens that we haven't seen since the spring harvest. Greens are easy to incorporate into a lot of recipes - add to casseroles, stir fries, lasagna, pasta mixtures, sautes, and of course soups, stews and smoothies. Even many of the "stronger" greens can be made into or bits can be added to salads. Please search this website for a lot of ideas - just put the word "greens" into the search bar. The recipes have been adapted to fit the farm's harvests - that is, many of the recipes will list several greens that can be used whereas if you search the internet most of the recipes specify a green or 2.
As for green tomatoes, you can do a couple of things with them. You can let them ripen - when I was a kid, we used to pick the green tomatoes from the plants right before frost, wrapped each one in newspaper, and then left them alone. Once per week we would unwrap all of them and check to see how they were progressing.
We also have a few recipes on this site - Green Tomato Sauce over Fettuccini, Green Tomato Relish and probably the best known way to use them - Sauteed Shrimp in Remoulade Sauce with Fried Green Tomatoes.
If you have some ideas on how to use your harvest, please email me at lindadansbury@comcast.net
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
September 25, 2016
A brief look into what's on the farmers' table
Other News
By Derek McGeehan
As farmers and eaters, we love to incorporate whole and simple food and meals into our diet because we're busy, like you, and have access to good quality ingredients, like you. We hear from members occasionally about their difficulty in using up a full share of produce on a weekly basis. Here, we would like to expose you to simple and easy ways of using your CSA share as we farmers do. To make a quality healthy meal is very easy; you really only need a few items like produce; meat, fish, poultry, eggs, cheese or some other kind of non-animal protein; sea salt; and a fat like coconut oil, olive oil, butter, or lard. As you become more familiar with cooking and using whole, simple ingredients you'll seldom need to follow recipes anymore. It's an enlightening and enriching endeavor. Eventually you may think most meals can be almost as good as Thanksgiving's main celebratory meal (as I like to think).
A quick and easy, extremely tasty, and incredibly healthy dinner meal:
  • 3 chopped savoy cabbages, 3 chopped bunches of chives, a tablespoon or so of sea salt, and a few tablespoons of coconut oil - roasted in a large pan at 400 degrees for an hour
  • A couple pounds of potatoes sliced into thin wedges, mixed with sea salt and some Ledamete lard, roasted on a cookie sheet at 400 degrees for an hour, with above dish
  • 3 Ledamete sausages cooked at 400 degrees for 40 minutes, with above dishes
Breakfast, about every day of the week:
  • Blend some kind of green like kale, some fruit, and mix with homemade kefir (which is made from Birchwood Dairy raw milk). A typical smoothie divided between Dana, Gabe, and me can include about 2 bunches of kale. Besides being an extremely efficient way to use up your greens, a smoothie like this is a meal and medicine in one and creates an overall sense of wellbeing.
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
September 25, 2016
Sign Up For 2016 Late Fall and 2017 Winter CSAs
Other News
By Derek McGeehan
Sign up now on the members' page to secure your spot in our 2016 Late Fall CSA and 2017 Winter CSA! For additional information please see the bulletin that was e-mailed to you this past week, log into the website and click the green "Join" buttons on the members' page, or look below.
2016 Late Fall CSA:
  • 6 weeks of fresh and storage crops from weeks 11/13/16 through 12/18/16
  • vegetables should include greens like arugula, spinach, mizuna, kale, collards, cabbage, napa cabbage, endive, escarole, lettuce, chard, and beet greens; roots like turnips, beets, radishes, potatoes, sweet potatoes, and kohlrabi; as well as storage crops like onions, garlic, and butternut; and freshly harvested alliums like chives, leeks, and scallions
  • cold hardy vegetables grown outside with use of low hoops and row cover
  • weekly full shares ($180) and biweekly half shares ($100) available
  • share distribution on Wednesdays 1-8pm (except for Tuesday 11/22/16)
2017 Winter CSA:
  • 8 weeks of fresh and storage crops from weeks 1/1/17 through 2/19/17
  • vegetables should include greens like arugula, spinach, mizuna, kale, collards, cabbage, napa cabbage, lettuce mix, chard, and beet greens; roots like turnips, beets, radishes, potatoes, sweet potatoes, and kohlrabi; as well as storage crops like onions, garlic, and butternut; and freshly harvested alliums like chives, leeks, and scallions
  • cold hardy vegetables grown inside of hoop house, high tunnel, and greenhouse
  • weekly full shares ($240) and biweekly half shares ($130) available
  • share distribution on Wednesdays 1-8pm
New England asters are blooming prolifically around the farm this time of year, satisfying many insects' late season nectar needs, such as monarch butterflies before their journey south, as well as this honeybee.
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
September 18, 2016
Workshifts Week of 9/18
Other News
By Derek McGeehan
Now that we're into the middle of September there is about one month left of workshift opportunities for you to satisfy the work component of your CSA share. If you're not planning to work this season, please remit the balance of your share cost soon. Half shares work 4 hours, full shares work 8 hours, over the course of the entire season. To "buy-out" of your work hours at $15/hour, please send a check payable to "Anchor Run CSA" at 2578 2nd Street Pike, Wrightstown, PA 18940. Please don't feel guilty about this option!
Shifts this week:
Tuesday 8-10am, 10am-12noon
Wednesday 8-10am, 10am-12noon, 6-8pm (garlic processing in barn)
Friday 8-10am, 10am-12noon
Saturday 10am-12noon
Workshift sign-up instructions may be found here.
Thank you!
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
September 18, 2016
Sign Up For 2016 Late Fall and 2017 Winter CSAs
Other News
By Derek McGeehan
Sign up now on the members' page to secure your spot in our 2016 Late Fall CSA and 2017 Winter CSA! For additional information please see the bulletin that was e-mailed to you this past week, log into the website and click the green "Join" buttons on the members' page, or look below.
2016 Late Fall CSA:
  • 6 weeks of fresh and storage crops from weeks 11/13/16 through 12/18/16
  • weekly full shares ($180) and biweekly half shares ($100) available
  • share distribution on Wednesdays 1-8pm (except for Tuesday 11/22/16)
2017 Winter CSA:
  • 8 weeks of fresh and storage crops from weeks 1/1/17 through 2/19/17
  • weekly full shares ($240) and biweekly half shares ($130) available
  • share distribution on Wednesdays 1-8pm
In the foreground are blooming aster and goldenrod, part of our 2-acre pollinator habitat. In the background are a couple acres of flowering buckwheat, hopefully providing good nectar for good insects.
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
September 18, 2016
Fermentation Workshop 9/25 1-3pm
Other News
Gia Yaccarino
Fermentation Member Share Workshop Sunday, September 25, 2016 1 – 3 PM
Please join us on Sunday, September 25, 2016 for our Fermenting Workshop. Information regarding fermenting resources, websites and books will be discussed. We invite all members from the fermenting pros to the novices to join us for discussion and education on fermenting basics. This year’s fermenting workshop is meant to be focused on the members - sharing their experiences – triumphs and failures, discussing their concerns about the fermenting process and answering questions. Please join us for what promises to be a very engaging workshop!
Additionally, Gia will share some fun fermenting information she just learned while attending the 2016 Farm Aid festival!
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
September 18, 2016
Fall crops begin
Other News
By Linda Dansbury
Crops are beginning to change - you have seen this by the kale and Swiss chard in the pick up room the past couple of weeks. Salad radishes, salad turnips, and beets will be a part of our shares off and on over the next month. Lettuce also returned.
The obvious thing is to either just eat the radishes and turnips out of hand or slice and put them into salads. They are also delicious when eaten with a very simple dip. I tried this in the spring and look forward to having it again. I have posted it to the site - Radishes with Goat Cheese Dip. It is delicious with all sorts of other veggies too - and healthier than most store purchased dips. Check out this site for delicious cooked salad turnip recipes.
Summer veggies allow us to make robust and delicious salads. Slice sweet peppers, scallions, radishes and carrots, chop tomatoes and mix a simple vinaigrette. The salad is crunchy, nutritious and delicious and it has enough flavor that to make it a meal, you can add canned tuna or other flaky fish, leftover cooked chicken and even thinly slice steak and top the salad with it for a lean and tasty dinner.
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
September 11, 2016
Maple Syrup and Honey For Sale!
Other News
Susan Klikus
Augusta Acres Farm, Susan and Todd Klikus, will be returning to Anchor Run Farm this Thursday September 15th from 1-6 pm to offer for sale their Pure Maple Syrup and their Pure, Local, Raw Honey.
Augusta Acre's maple syrup is produced from sap collected strictly on their farm and boiled down in small batches on their wood fired arch. It is Pure, Dark, Robust syrup.
Their Honey is all extracted from their farm's apiaries. It is an "All Season" honey which features a dark, very sweet flavor. It is Pure, Local and Raw.
Both maple syrup and honey will be available in pint and quart glass jars. Prices this year will be the same for both "Sweets":
Maple syrup: Pint $18 Quart $24
Honey: Pint (20 oz.) $18 Quart (40 oz.) $24
Recap reusable jar lids will also be available for $6.00.
They will be at Anchor Run from 1:00 - 6:00 PM on Thursday September 15th for tasting and pick up. Susan and Todd accept cash and personal checks made out to Augusta Acres.
Any questions and to pre-order please email Susan at susanklikus@gmail.com
Augusta Acres is a small sustainable farm located near the Delaware River in upstate PA. They practice organic methods, are members of Pennsylvania Association for Sustainable Agriculture, Pennsylvania Maple Producers Assoc., and The NE PA Beekeepers.
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
September 11, 2016
Workshifts Week of 9/11
Other News
By Derek McGeehan
Now that we're into the middle of September there is about one month left of workshift opportunities for you to satisfy the work component of your CSA share. If you're not planning to work this season, please remit the balance of your share cost soon. Half shares work 4 hours, full shares work 8 hours, over the course of the entire season. To "buy-out" of your work hours at $15/hour, please send a check payable to "Anchor Run CSA" at 2578 2nd Street Pike, Wrightstown, PA 18940. Please don't feel guilty about this option!
Shifts this week:
Tuesday 8-10am, 10am-12noon
Wednesday 8-10am, 10am-12noon
Friday 8-10am, 10am-12noon
Saturday 10am-12noon
Workshift sign-up instructions may be found here.
Thank you!
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
September 11, 2016
Fermentation Workshop 9/25 1-3pm
Other News
Gia Yaccarino
Fermentation Member Share Workshop Sunday, September 25, 2016 1 – 3 PM
Please join us on Sunday, September 25, 2016 for our Fermenting Workshop. Information regarding fermenting resources, websites and books will be discussed. We invite all members from the fermenting pros to the novices to join us for discussion and education on fermenting basics. This year’s fermenting workshop is meant to be focused on the members - sharing their experiences – triumphs and failures, discussing their concerns about the fermenting process and answering questions. Please join us for what promises to be a very engaging workshop!
Here, drip tape is saving the lives of our newly transplanted chard and spinach on a 95 degree September day. Because of our new drip tape winder, we're able to reuse most of the drip tape for more than one season.
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
September 4, 2016
Maple Syrup and Honey For Sale!
Other News
Susan Klikus
Augusta Acres Farm, Susan and Todd Klikus, will be returning to Anchor Run Farm on Thursday September 15th to offer for sale their Pure Maple Syrup and their Pure, Local, Raw Honey.
Augusta Acre's maple syrup is produced from sap collected strictly on their farm and boiled down in small batches on their wood fired arch. It is Pure, Dark, Robust syrup.
Their Honey is all extracted from their farm's apiaries. It is an "All Season" honey which features a dark, very sweet flavor. It is Pure, Local and Raw.
Both maple syrup and honey will be available in pint and quart glass jars. Prices this year will be the same for both "Sweets":
Maple syrup: Pint $18 Quart $24
Honey: Pint (20 oz.) $18 Quart (40 oz.) $24

Recap reusable jar lids will also be available for $6.00.
They will be at Anchor Run from 1:00 - 6:00 PM on Thursday September 15th for tasting and pick up. Susan and Todd accept cash and personal checks made out to Augusta Acres.
Any questions and to pre-order please email Susan at susanklikus@gmail.com
Augusta Acres is a small sustainable farm located near the Delaware River in upstate PA. They practice organic methods, are members of Pennsylvania Association for Sustainable Agriculture, Pennsylvania Maple Producers Assoc., and The NE PA Beekeepers.
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
September 4, 2016
Fermentation Workshop 9/25 1-3pm
Other News
Gia Yaccarino
Fermentation Member Share Workshop Sunday, September 25, 2016 1 – 3 PM
Please join us on Sunday, September 25, 2016 for our Fermenting Workshop. Information regarding fermenting resources, websites and books will be discussed. We invite all members from the fermenting pros to the novices to join us for discussion and education on fermenting basics. This year’s fermenting workshop is meant to be focused on the members - sharing their experiences – triumphs and failures, discussing their concerns about the fermenting process and answering questions. Please join us for what promises to be a very engaging workshop!
Another toad in the newsletter!
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
September 4, 2016
Workshifts Week of 9/4
Other News
By Derek McGeehan
Half of your committed work hours should be completed soon! Over the course of the season full shares work 8 hours; half shares work 4 hours. If you're unable to contribute the physical portion of your share, you must contribute to the farm financially at the rate of $15/hour. This fills out the balance of your share cost.
Monday Labor Day 9/5 10am-12noon
Tuesday 9/6 8-10am; 10am-12noon
Wednesday 9/7 8-10am; 10am-12noon
Friday 9/9 8-10am; 10am-12noon
Workshift sign-up instructions may be found here.
Thank you!
Morning dew on buckwheat that is ready to flower and attract pollinators.
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
September 4, 2016
Veggie Salads
Other News
By Linda Dansbury
Due to extreme heat and dry weather, there is a break in lettuce that can be harvested, so if you are a family that loves salads, you may be wondering what to do. Through the year, we eat salads almost every night, but in the summer, I find that the lettuce often gets pushed to the back of the fridge in favor of making vegetable salads. Cucumbers are of course the first, but as I mentioned last week, kale makes delicious salads - such as Kale Caesar Salad. So do carrots and tomatoes - tomatoes are one of, if not my favorite, because the "juice" (read dressing mixed with the tomato juices) at the bottom of the bowl is about the most delicious thing when sopped up with a good loaf of bread. In my family, we peeled the tomatoes, but admittedly when I am in a hurry I just cut them up into slightly larger than bite sized pieces. Add chopped sweet pepper and sliced scallions or onion. Then make a dressing with red wine vinegar, olive oil, a bit of dried oregano, salt, pepper and chopped basil or parsley. Mix up and enjoy. By the way, you can use a drop of balsamic vinegar if you want, but I prefer the lighter red wine vinegar to let the flavors of these delicious tomatoes come through.
I realize that most if not all of your carrots are being eaten out of hand as snacks, but there are 3 delicious salads on this site: Spicy Carrot Salad, Edamame and Carrot Salad with Rice Vinegar, and Lemony Carrot Salad with Dill. Try one or all as a nice change for your dinner table!
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
August 28, 2016
Workshifts week of 8/28
Other News
By Derek McGeehan
Half of your committed work hours should be completed soon! Over the course of the season full shares work 8 hours; half shares work 4 hours. If you're unable to contribute the physical portion of your share, you must contribute to the farm financially at the rate of $15/hour. This fills out the balance of your share cost.
Tuesday 8/30 8-10am; 10am-12noon
Wednesday 8/31 8-10am; 10am-12noon; 6-8pm
Friday 9/2 8-10am; 10am-12noon
Saturday 9/3 8-10am
Monday Labor Day 10am-12noon
Workshift sign-up instructions may be found here.
Thank you!
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
August 28, 2016
U Pick Winding Down, Fall Greens Returning
Other News
By Linda Dansbury
Even though it still feels like summer, the fields are starting to say fall. This week the weather will become more fall-like and the cooler night temps along with shorter days will slow down the summer crops. Please make sure you work U-pick into your schedule, because there are only a couple of weeks left to pick before the crops are finished for 2016.
Kale will make it's first appearance in a while and barring a major insect or weather event, we should see it nearly every week going forward. Since it is still quite warm, consider making Kale Caesar Salad. I find massaging the leaves into velvet, as the recipe describes to be quite relaxing. Another great way to use kale for a 1 dish meal in which we currently have all the ingredients is to remove mid ribs and roughly chop the kale; cut up potatoes into thick slices or chunks, slice onions. Put all in a large bowl and drizzle with olive oil, and salt and pepper to taste. Mix well. Place in a baking dish and top with chicken thighs and/or drumsticks that have been oiled, and salt and peppered. Cover with foil and place in a 375 degree oven for about 20 min. Remove foil and continue cooking until potatoes are tender and chicken is cooked through and slightly browned - about 15 minutes. Enjoy with a side salad of tomatoes or lettuces.
The first picking of fall kale commenced early Sunday morning. Below a few acres of woods, this field was drowned in July by the 12 inches of rain but now, after setting up and running irrigation during an extremely dry August, crops are thankfully thriving.
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
August 21, 2016
Summer crops
Other News
By Linda Dansbury
This week we will have cured garlic in the pick up room, which means the covering around each clove has "hardened off" enough that they protect the bulbs, ie., you no longer need to refrigerate what is picked up. They still need to be stored in a reasonably cool, dry place or they will rot/dry out/sprout sooner rather than later.
For newer members, what do you do with the edamame? Well, it makes a delicious Hummus. Also, they freeze really well. I typically freeze half to 2/3 of my harvest of edamame. I shell many of them prior to freezing to save time later in the year when I dig them out of the freezer, but if I don't have time, I freeze them shell and all. One thing you may not know is that edamame can be used in place of lima beans in recipes, which is how most of mine get used up - added to soups, stews, used in succotash - they are wonderful! and so good for you.
To us, one sign of a healthy nontoxic environment is the presence of amphibians so we get fairly excited whenever we discover one. Fortunately on the farm we do see toads, frogs, and salamanders frequently and we hope this means it is a healthy and safe place, and remains that way.
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
August 21, 2016
Ledamete Grass Farm's Monthly Market August 25th, preorder now!
Other News
Ledamete Grass Farm will be at Anchor Run Farm for a market day on Thursday, August 25 from 1-5pm*!
*If you can't make that day/time, pre-orders can be left in the freezer for you to pick up on your next share day.
Order Your Pastured Meats Today- Deadline Midnight August 22nd!
100% Grassfed Beef
Pasture & Forest Raised Pork
Pastured Chicken
PRE-ORDERS preferred but day of sales will be welcomed.
To learn more about our farming practices, read below, visit our website, and check us out on Facebook. . To order visit our e-commerce site here. Ledamete Grass Farm Pasture & Forest-Raised Pork
We raise Tamworth cross heritage breed pigs, as they thrive in the forest and field and are known for their excellent flavor. In addition to forage, our pigs are fed local grain raised with organic methods, organic veggie compost, and grass-fed raw dairy products.
Ledamete Grass Farm Pastured Poultry
Our chickens and turkeys are raised on pasture with constant access to fresh bugs, herbs and grasses. In addition to the forage they find, we provide our birds with grain, grown and milled fresh by a local farmer who utilizes organic methods. The birds' access to fresh air, exercise, sunshine, green grass and bugs creates very delicious and nutritious meat!
Ledamete Grass Farm 100% Grassfed Beef
We raise Rotakawa Devon/Jersey Cross beef as they do very well on 100% grass. This meat is nutrient dense and delicious!
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
August 21, 2016
Workshifts week of 8/21
Other News
By Derek McGeehan
Half of your committed work hours should be completed soon! Over the course of the season full shares work 8 hours; half shares work 4 hours. If you're unable to contribute the physical portion of your share, you must contribute to the farm financially at the rate of $15/hour. This fills out the balance of your share cost.
Tuesday 8/23 8-10am; 10am-12noon
Wednesday 8/24 8-10am; 10am-12noon; 6-8pm
Friday 8/26 8-10am; 10am-12noon
Saturday 8/27 8-10am
Workshift sign-up instructions may be found here.
Thank you!
If you attend an evening workshift there is a good chance you'll enjoy a beautiful sky and sunset. Photo credit farmer Mary Liz.
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
August 14, 2016
Okra and Hot Peppers
Other News
By Linda Dansbury
This will be the first week for hot peppers and I think most people know at least something about them. In order to determine how many to use in a recipe, prior to chopping them up and adding to a recipe, slice the pepper(s) and then touch the cut edge with your finger and taste it - be prepared for the heat to come on - but, some types have just a mild heat and taste is more fruity than hot. Like sweet peppers, they store well in plastic in the fridge. They also freeze fine. Just put them in a plastic bag or container whole and place in freezer.
Okra is an item we have only seen a few times so far this year. Okra is probably best known in this country as the essential ingredient in Gumbo, and in fact, one early name for Okra was gumbo. Okra does not keep well, so use it within a week. It does well being quickly blanched and frozen or cook it and enjoy or freeze. There are several seasonal recipes on this site, including Roasted potato and okra salad, Easy Indian-style okra stew, Okra and green beans and Louisiana shrimp gumbo - the later is a much lighter version of the better known gumbo recipes that begin with a dark rue. The bolded recipes above can be clicked on to get right to the recipes.
The intriguingly beautiful and reproductively important okra blossom on 5 foot tall and growing plants will eventually produce the edible portion of the plant, an elongated green fruit with numerous seeds.
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
August 14, 2016
Workshifts for week 8/14
Other News
By Derek McGeehan
Half of your committed work hours should be completed soon! Over the course of the season full shares work 8 hours; half shares work 4 hours. If you're unable to contribute the physical portion of your share, you may contribute to the farm financially at the rate of $15/hour. This fills out the balance of your share cost.
Tuesday 8/16 8-10am; 10am-12noon
Wednesday 8/17 8-10am; 10am-12noon; 6-8pm
Friday 8/19 8-10am; 10am-12noon
Saturday 8/20 8-10am
Workshift sign-up instructions may be found here.
Thank you!
On an extremely and almost intolerably hot Friday afternoon, Hannah and Mary Liz made an attempt to seed fall crops in the shade of a beach umbrella. Seeding is a good job in hot weather. Photo credit Mary Liz Watson.
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
August 7, 2016
New this week - Fresh onions. Spaghetti squash and Edamame!!
Other News
By Linda Dansbury
Wow, it is hard to believe we are already into August - the veggie assortment tells us how late it already is in the season. Three new items arrive this week - all things that I really enjoy!
Fresh Onions - not a lot I have to say about these - they are to be used as you would "cured" onions in any recipe. The only difference is these need to be stored in the refrigerator.
Spaghetti Squash - is called this because of the way the flesh separates into spaghetti-like strands when cooked. Spaghetti squash is the first of the hard shelled or winter squashes we receive and although they do store well, these will not keep as long as some of the others that will come later in the season. Store them in a cool part of your house, but not too humid - I say this because some basements are great temperature wise, but might be too humid this time of year for good storage conditions. To cook them, I have tried several suggested methods over the years and have decided that the easiest, most reliable method is to preheat over to about 375 degrees. Cut the squash lengthwise in half and scoop out the seeds. Place the squash cut side down in a deep baking dish and put enough water in the dish to cover the bottom. Bake for 25-35 minutes, or until a knife goes easily through - time is dependent on size of the squash. Remove from oven and when cool enough to handle take a fork and scrape the strands out of the shells. We have several delicious recipes on this site so please use the search feature. This time of year I would say my favorite way is to prepare the Uncooked Tomato Sauce recipe and top the hot strands of the spaghetti squash with the sauce, adding whatever cheese component you like - simple and delicious!!
Edamame - is one of the treats most anticipated by long time members. Take the time to do your U Pick - I try to plan my weekends to do U-Pick when the weather is at the best it can be - sometimes heat, humidity and T-storms make it a bit of a challenge, but you definitely don't want to miss out. The most mature pods are typically at the bottom of the plants. Pick those that have well formed beans showing through the outer shell. Store in a plastic bag until ready to prepare - I have to say that my first picking each year gets eaten up immediately, and then later pickings I get to prepare and freeze for use all winter long. Bring a large pot of water to a boil and add A LOT of salt - about 2 Tablespoons per 3 quarts of water. Add beans and be careful they don't boil over - that is the reason for mentioning a large pot - start checking for tenderness at about 9 minutes - sometimes they are ready at that point but can take up to 15 minutes. Drain and salt again - suck the pods and the beans will come right out - Yum!! I will highlight recipes in future weeks but you can search the site for delicious ways to use your edamame.
Boiled in water with a tablespoon or two of salt for 10-15 minutes renders edamame into quite a delectable snack. With a gentle squeeze the beans slide right out of their pods.
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
August 7, 2016
Workshifts Week of 8/7
Other News
By Derek McGeehan
Half of your committed work hours should be completed soon! Over the course of the season full shares work 8 hours; half shares work 4 hours. If you're unable to contribute the physical portion of your share, you may contribute to the farm financially at the rate of $15/hour. This fills out the balance of your share cost.
  • Tuesday 8/9 8-10am; 10am-12noon
  • Wednesday 8/10 8-10am; 10am-12noon; 6-8pm
  • Friday 8/12 8-10am; 10am-12noon
  • Saturday 8/13 8-10am
Workshift sign-up instructions may be found here.
Thank you!
This smiling crew helped retrieve the first round of winter squash from the field. Spaghetti squash will be followed by kabocha, delicata, sweet dumpling, and several varieties of butternut.
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
July 31, 2016
U-Pick Note
Other News
By Linda Dansbury
I am sure we all feel the same sadness and disappointment when walking through the U-pick tomatoes - a very high percentage are split and rotting due to the extreme weather we have been having. This has happened in past years as well, and I have seen that people then seem to stop going into the cherry tomato beds thinking they are finished for the season. But, they aren't. More little tomatoes will ripen beautifully once the weather dries out again. Later this week is supposed to be beautiful so in another week or 2 there will be a new batch of little delicious tomatoes ready for you to enjoy.
Bouncing from one weather extreme to another is extremely challenging for the farm but at least makes for a nice photo once in a while. Gabe ponders the heavens in the earth.
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
July 31, 2016
Husk Cherries New this Week
Other News
By Linda Dansbury
We are well into the summer season and from a harvest standpoint, that means that the crops will stay pretty much the same for the next few weeks with a new or different item here and there. This week we have husk cherries, which are also known as ground cherries and cape gooseberries. They are in the same botanical genus as tomatillos, and look like minature versions of them. They have significant amounts of beta carotene, protein, calcium, fiber, vitamin C and iron. One of their names, ground cherries, is due to how they are best harvested: when they are really ripe, they fall off the plant and so all you do is pick them off of the ground. In most years, they can sit on the ground with just their protective husk for a long time waiting for one of us to pick them up - with all of this year's rain, I am not sure how long they will keep. To store them, you can just leave them in their husks and sit on the counter or table - they will keep for weeks at room temperature. Early settlers and Native Americans used these as a major portion of their diet through the winter because it is a very nutritional item that doesn't require any preservation.
The taste is somewhat tropical - I have read this description of their taste: a cherry tomato injected with mango and pineapple juice. We have a couple of recipes on this site - Ground Cherry Pie and Ground Cherry Jam. Other ways to enjoy them include using them in salsa, adding to salads with a bit of goat cheese, layer with tomatoes and basil for an easy appetizer, or in meat or fish dishes as a replacement for other recommended fruits.
When husk cherries are ripe they drop from the branches to the ground, hence the alternate name ground cherries. As Gabe demonstrates, picking these is an enjoyable and adventurous task for kids.
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
July 24, 2016
Workshifts This Week of 7/24
Other News
Half of your committed work hours should be completed by the end of July! Over the course of the season full shares work 8 hours; half shares work 4 hours. If you're unable to contribute the physical portion of your share, you may contribute to the farm financially at the rate of $15/hour. This fills out the balance of your share cost.
This week we'll transplant kale, lettuce, and beets; pull weeds; cultivate; and possible harvest onions and/or watermelon. Beat the heat by coming in the morning!
Tuesday 7/26 8-10am; 10am-12noon
Wednesday 7/27 8-10am; 10am-12noon; 6-8pm
Friday 7/29 8-10am; 10am-12noon
Saturday 7/30 8-10am
A close up of an echinacea bloom, also known as purple coneflower, in the 2-acre pollinator habitat.
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
July 24, 2016
Sweet Corn and Tomatillos!
Other News
By Linda Dansbury
For the first time ever we will be receiving sweet corn as part of our share! Everyone knows how they like to cook their corn - for us, we most often boil a pot of water, add the corn, and then turn the water off. We eat our main course and then eat the corn. We eat it completely plain - no butter, not even salt! Farmers D&D eat theirs raw, uncooked, and plain. They think the flavor needs no embellishing.
A very important thing to remember is that corn loses it's sweetness quickly, especially at warm temperatures - some of the newer varieties stay sweet longer, but you need to put your share in plastic and get into your refrigerator ASAP - or better yet, eat it for dinner the evening of your pick up.
Tomatillos are an unusual veggie that may not be very well known to new members. They look like an un-ripe tomato that has a papery skin around it. To harvest them, as with many other veggies, look low on the plant. The veggie is ready when the papery husk is split and is getting loose around the veggie. In the stores, tomatillos are typically green because they are not at optimum ripeness. Look for fruit that is turning yellow - I have often found the best ones to be laying on the ground, especially as it gets later in the season.
Storing tomatillos is simple - plastic bags in the fridge - they keep for a couple of weeks so I often save 2 weeks worth and then "process" them. They also can be frozen whole after removing the papery skin.
To eat tomatillos, they can be diced up and added to salads - they have a mild flavor, reminiscent of citrus. I don't particularly love them this way so I cook and then use them. I sometimes grill them, or I halve them and roast them in the oven and then proceed with recipes for Salsa Verde, or a sauce to use with chicken and/or fish. I find myself making batches and freezing for use later in the year. My go-to recipe is the tomatillo sauce from the Chicken Stew with Tomatillo Sauce. The tomatillo sauce is great as used in the recipe but it also makes a great salsa for chips. I just searched this site and there are truly nice recipes that I had forgotten about so now I am very excited to pick tomatillos!!
Certified organic and non-gmo seed and not-quite-yet-certified-but-organic-otherwise growing practices produced a beautiful ear of sweet corn. Who would have thought it was possible?
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
July 17, 2016
The heat is on!
Other News
By Linda Dansbury
Yes, it is very hot outside right now, but my reference to it has more to do with the amount of veggies we receive this time of the year - we are close to the peak right now both for those items that are picked up at the barn and u-pick. The veggie list at this time of year doesn't change much, but the quantity is huge! So, I start working on making recipes that we can eat some and freeze some, or salads from veggies that will keep for a few days. Right now I have most of the eggplants from 2 weeks of harvest so I am planning to make some baba ganoush and try an eggplant salad - if it is as yummy as it sounds, I will share it next week.
With all the snap beans, I will make a large green bean salad, which is actually best starting on the second day. It will keep for over a week and I can have it for lunches or as a dinner side dish. I make a simple red wine vinaigrette for the salad - my "add-ins" can be some or all of the following: scallions, basil/parsley, chopped peppers, sliced celery, chick peas, feta cheese.
Speaking of snap beans, we have a couple of simple methods to get them ready for freezing. Last year at our "Now What" Seminar, a member said she had read that you don't need to blanch green beans before freezing, which has been the standard practice for many years. To do this, clean and dry them, then place on a cookie sheet and place in freezer. When frozen, place in good quality plastic bags or containers, and freeze. I have never tried this method myself, so someone who has done it and then eaten the beans later in the year, please let me know how well it works at lindadansbury@comcast.net
I also make slaw with my cabbages - again, large amounts so I can have it for a few days. To boost flavor and nutrition, in addition to using cabbage in my slaws, I slice Swiss chard or other greens thinly and add it to the mix.
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
July 17, 2016
Member Share Workshop July 23rd 1-3pm
Other News
Hosted by longtime CSA and Core Group member Gia
At the request of members, we are hosting the first follow-up to the Now What?! Workshop. All members are invited to share their successes and/or discuss what issues they are experiencing in handling their CSA Share. We might not have all the answers, but we will sure try!
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
July 17, 2016
Workshifts This Week
Other News
Half of your committed work hours should be completed by the end of July! Over the course of the season full shares work 8 hours; half shares work 4 hours. If you're unable to contribute the physical portion of your share, you may contribute to the farm financially at the rate of $15/hour. This fills out the balance of your share cost.
This week we'll harvest carrots, pull weeds, and probably cultivate. Beat the heat by coming in the morning!
Tuesday 7/19 8-10am; 10am-12noon
Wednesday 7/20 8-10am; 10am-12noon; 6-8pm
Friday 7/22 8-10am; 10am-12noon
Saturday 7/23 8-10am
Baby flycatchers nestle on a beam in the Walnut Barn. A parent or two made a beautiful nest, including some orange straw bale twine.
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
July 10, 2016
U-Pick request
Other News
By Linda Dansbury
U-pick is a large portion of your CSA share, so please be sure to make time each of your pick up weeks to pick your allotment of crops. The farm is open 8am-8pm Monday through Sunday of your pick up week. A couple of comments/requests on things I have observed that need to be remembered in consideration of all of the farm members:
I noticed that several of the parsley plants in the herb garden have had all of the leaves taken off, making the plants so stripped they died. If there isn't much parsley (or other herb), please just take a couple of leaves. It will only take a short time for more to grow. Also, very shortly there will be an adequate amount in the main u-pick field.
Use the containers in the barn to accurately measure what to pick, then dump them into a plastic bag or other container. I noticed someone doing U-pick right into plastic bags, which will in all likelihood result in picking too much, because a half pint of raspberries looks like such a tiny amount in a large plastic bag.
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
July 10, 2016
Fresh Garlic is here!!
Other News
By Linda Dansbury
Fresh garlic is wonderful! The reason it is called fresh garlic is because it has just been harvested so the outer protective layers have not "hardened off" by weeks of hanging in a dry area. Use the fresh garlic exactly the way you use hardened off garlic (unlike the scapes, which do not tolerate long cooking). But...it must be refrigerated or it will spoil.
A note on cabbage - it will keep for a long time stored in plastic in the fridge but if you want to make a delicious summery slaw now, add some thinly sliced chard, scallions, garlic scapes, carrots (if you have any left) and your favorite vinaigrette.
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
July 10, 2016
From Asparagus to Zucchini Cookbooks Are Here!
Other News
For several years prior to her departure from our earthly plane, Jeannine Vannais worked hard to transform the Anchor Run herb garden into the lovely paradise that it is today. In her honor and memory we are planning to build a pergola and arbor within the herb garden for vining plants to provide shade atop a comfortable space with benches. To raise money for the materials and installation of the pergola we're having a cookbook sale. "From Asparagus to Zucchini: A Guide to Cooking Farm-Fresh Seasonal Produce" will be available to purchase for $20 from the pick up room. From each purchase, $7 will go to the cost of the pergola. For more information on the book, please follow this link. Books should be available within the next week or so; look for them in the pick up room.
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
July 3, 2016
Cabbage and fennel
Other News
By Linda Dansbury
Cabbage is one of the new items this week. Given that it is summer and cookout time, cole slaw is the obvious choice. Each family seems to have their favorite recipe - years ago, when searching for recipes for Anchor Run, I found one that has become a favorite for our family and friends - Asian Cole Slaw. Shred some of the carrots and slice some celery thinly and add to the mix. Yum! Since we are having a party today, I wish I already had my cabbage pick up. Cabbage keeps for a very long time in the fridge when stored in a plastic bag or container. But...the taste will get stronger the longer it is stored, so for the best flavor, use it up within 2 weeks.
Fennel is another new item for this week and you may not be very familiar with it. It also stores well in plastic in the fridge, although the fronds are pretty perishable. Fennel has a licorice/anise flavor, especially when eaten raw - it seems people either love that taste or not. I happen to prefer fennel cooked, which tames the strong flavor - to me it becomes delicious! There are a lot of fennel recipes on this site - both raw and cooked. Fennel mixes well with many of the other veggies we are receiving now. Try doing something like this: grill or roast fennel and zucchini slices that have been tossed in olive oil, salt and pepper. When tender, make into a pasta salad, adding sliced scallions, garlic scapes and a lot of basil leaves. Toss with olive oil and a bit of your favorite vinegar or lemon juice. Yum! To make it heartier, add a can of white beans to the mix - white beans, lentils and fennel were made for each other!
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
June 26, 2016
New veggies info
Other News
By Linda Dansbury
The past couple of weeks have shown us some new veggies that you may not be very familiar with so here is a bit of info for scallions, dandelion greens and radicchio.
Scallions - everyone knows this delicious member of the allium family, which also includes onions and leeks. Store them in a plastic bag in the fridge, where they will keep for about a week. As I described a few weeks ago with the garlic scapes, scallions should not be cooked for long periods of time, because their delicate onion flavor will be lost. You may only know them to be used as a garnish or stir fried, but they are also delicious grilled - brush with olive oil prior to grilling and watch closely, turning every couple of minutes so they just get lightly charred. When making a saute like the one in this week's Member Ideas section, I would also add a scallion or 2 near the end of cooking to add the onion taste component to the dish.
Italian dandelion greens - this may be one of the most misunderstood greens we have at the farm. Dandelion is definitely bitter, but can be tamed and enjoyed by using it in some of the following ways: try the Garlic Braised Dandelion Greens with White Bean Puree that is on this site - beans have a great way of taming the bitterness of things like dandelion and broccoli raab. This recipe can be used with pretty much any cooking green we receive so even if you don't pick up the dandelion, you should try this dish - it is delicious. Another good recipe is the Dandelion Salad with Warm Hazelnut Vinaigrette. The nuts and oil also calm down the bitterness of these greens. Of course, dandelion greens can also be made into Dandelion and Pumpkin Seed Pesto - I found an interesting sounding one I will try - it uses green pumpkin seeds instead of nuts - the author says the toasty taste balances out the bitter greens and uses the pesto over pasta, as a sandwich spread or dip.
Radicchio - you probably see this in the grocery stores, and on some restaurant plates, but maybe you have never prepared it yourself? Again, it does have some bitterness. The simplest way to use it for me is to use a leaf or 2 in a mixed green salad - I then cut them into slivers and it adds a nice bite when combined with other more mild greens. I also love to grill it - cut the heads in half or quarters, depending on size, brush with olive oil and as I described with scallions, watch closely - you just want a light char. Remove from the grill, plate and drizzle with a bit more olive oil and balsamic vinegar, salt and pepper to taste - if you want, grate some parmesan cheese over and add a few toasted nuts of your choice. Or slice the grilled radicchio up and mix in with cooked pasta, adding the same things described as when served alone.
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
June 19, 2016
An Abundance of Peas!
Other News
By Linda Dansbury
I hope everyone got out to the field to do the U-Pick this week - the peas are at the perfect stage and there are so many that even this quantity goes quickly.
You may be wondering what to do with them all now that you have them. They are so sweet they can be eaten raw as a snack, either alone or dipped in your favorite dip or hummus or the Garlic Scape and White Bean Dip. Or, try the Orzo with Sugar Snaps and Dill - this one uses peas, scallions and dill, and I am always happy when a recipe incorporates multiple farm offerings. This site has several recipes for peas - both salads as well as hot dishes.
Both the sugar snaps and snow peas should be cooked for only 2 minutes so they keep their crunch. They can be steamed, boiled or stir fried - all methods work well, although I prefer steaming and stir frying over boiling.
Peas can be frozen with or without blanching them. Blanch for 1 minute and then plunge in an ice water bath to stop the cooking. Drain, and then lay them out on towels to dry. Place on cookie sheets and place in freezer. Once frozen, place them in freezer bags or plastic container - don't forget to label and date them. If you skip blanching, remove the stem and string prior to freezing.
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
June 12, 2016
Now What?! Workshop Recap
Other News
By Gia
The Now What?! Workshop was attended by about 20 members! It was a great exchange of ideas and information. Judith, another Core Group member, was also present and helped to field questions (Thanks Judith!). We spoke about how to keep the produce fresh (Greens Bags, Rubbermaid FreshWorks and Produce Saver containers), separating the greens from the bulbs and storing them separately. We talked about different tools which make the veggie prep work easier. We feasted on a variety of Pistou (I usually make my Pesto without the nuts) – Garlic Scape Pistou, Kale Pistou Lite and Mizuna Pistou were all tried. Members also tasted ARF Week 3/4 Quiche (see the recipe below).
This year we spent some time talking about using a solar oven to cook. My (flat) Mango Banana Bread- baked on Friday in my solar oven – was enjoyed.
Food Dehydrators were also discussed, and Zucchini Chips (from last year’s bounty) were shared. Tomatoes and Zucchini were the stars of this discussion.
The Now What?! Workshop was so successful that I was asked if we would do something on a more regular basis! We will be planning workshops with more of a Member Idea Exchange theme. We will also be having a Member Share Fermenting Workshop. Stay tuned for more info on both of these! This workshop was the perfect example of the C in CSA – Community. Thank you to everyone who attended!
ARF Week 3/4 Quiche
Beet Greens, Kohlrabi Greens
• Chopped
• Steamed (about 5 to 15 minutes)
• Squeeze out liquid when cool
Mizuna – about 1 bunch
• Chopped,
• Sautéed
Kohlrabi Bulbs - about 3 medium bulbs
• Shredded or pureed
• Mix with 1 tsp salt
• Squeeze out moisture
Dehydrated tomatoes – 1 to 2 handfuls
Cilantro – ½ to 1 handful chopped
½ to 1 cup Shredded Mexican blend cheese
2/3 to 1 cup whole wheat flour
8 to 10 eggs
2/3 to 1 cup milk
1. Combine ingredients.
2. Pour into 8x8 greased casserole pan
3. Bake at 400 degrees for 30 – 45 minutes
Experiment with the greens you use! Experiment with the type of cheese!
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
June 12, 2016
Top of the carrots to ya!
Other News
By Linda Dansbury
My guess is most of you throw the carrot tops into your compost pile, or leave them at the farm for the same thing. Maybe you use them as one of the items to make vegetable stock, which is a really good use for them. But, you should make Carrot Top Pesto out of the tops you will be receiving over the next couple of weeks - it is delicious and nutritious. As with the turnips and beets, remove the greens from the carrots as soon as you get them home and store in the fridge in separate bags. To use the greens remove the thick, tough stems and put into veggie stock or compost pile - the thin fronds can be made into salads or made into Carrot Top Pesto. The carrot top pesto can be used like any other pesto - on pasta, added to chicken or tuna salad, as a topping for fish or meat, drizzled onto hard boiled eggs - the list goes on. Also, keep an open mind in making the pesto itself - use the recipe as a baseline, the nuts, cheese type, herbs and citrus can all be changed to what you like and have on hand. I have added the recipe for this week.
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
June 12, 2016
New Crops
Other News
By Linda Dansbury
Last week brought us a new item that is a farm treasure - garlic scapes which is the flower stalk and bud from the garlic plant. If left on the plant, it will take most of the energy from the plant so the bulbs won't form. By harvesting the scapes, we essentially have an extra crop. Scapes keep in the fridge for at least when stored in a plastic bag. They can be chopped up and frozen, or made into Garlic Scape Pesto or Garlic Scape and White Bean Dip and eaten immediately or frozen. It is best eaten uncooked, but if you want to cook it, add it at the end of the cooking process because long term cooking diminishes the flavor of an already mild garlic flavor.
This week brings us the first of the summer squash. Anchor Run grows a lot of varieties of summer squash - they come in many different shapes, colors and sizes. If you only choose those you are familiar with, you are missing out. They are all interchangeable in recipes, but with simple preparation, such as grilling (my favorite), you can pick up subtle differences in flavor. With Father's Day coming up next Sunday, many of us will be grilling. Depending on the shape and size of the squash, cut it in a way that will give you slices that are about a half to 3/4 of an inch thick. Brush with olive oil and season with salt and pepper. Grill, and watch carefully so they don't burn. Turn a few times so each side cooks equally. This delicious veggie goes well with anything, from a part of an appetizer platter to a veggie side dish with a grilled protein. We also have many recipes on this site. Enjoy the harvest!!
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
June 5, 2016
Beets are here
Other News
By Linda Dansbury
Over the many years I have been writing for the farm, the public's knowledge and taste for various vegetables have truly evolved. In the beginning, most people really didn't know what to do with things like kale and chard. Now with juicing and smoothies being so popular, even if those greens are too much to prepare and eat as part of a meal, I often hear members say "Oh I will juice these greens". Or "My kids love smoothies with kale".
The same thing has happened with beets - most folks used to say that they didn't like beets, but now they are happy and excited when beets appear. I particularly like them early in the season when they are small and sweet. Beets are so nutritious and so much can be done with them. As with turnips, separate the greens from the beets and store separately. The greens can be used with other greens in stir fries and saute's and there are a couple of recipes on this site that incorporate both together, such as Roasted Beet and Beet Green Risotto and Roasted Beets and Beet Greens. If we receive beets without their greens, Swiss chard is a great substitution, because they are in the same family. Again, search this site for great ideas and recipes.
Beets keep a long time stored in the fridge or pickled, but again, at this time of year I actually like to use them quickly because they are sweeter. We love them roasted, sliced and mixed with greens in a beautiful salad with a Dijon mustard and tarragon dressing. Yummy!
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
June 5, 2016
Salad Days
Other News
By Linda Dansbury
You may be wondering what to do with the vast quantity of lettuces you are receiving with your share right now. If you typically use the same salad dressing recipe every time you prepare a salad, you might get bored of the repetitiveness. Check out this website for a multitude of dressings and variations on vinaigrettes that will keep your tastebuds happy. There is a basic vinaigrette with a number of variations, balsamic vinaigrette, lemon-chive and it goes on and on. Just go to the website, click on "Members Page". Then select the tab that says "Search". In the pull down bar select "Recipes" and type in "dressing" or "salad" and you will see the listing.
I almost think of lettuces as the main vegetable in a meal and try to match the dressing with what we are having for dinner. For example, if we are having a meal that is comprised of Asian flavors, then my salad dressing will have sesame oil and/or tamari/soy sauce in it. With the start of peas, I will add peas either raw or flash boiled for 1-2 minutes. With a steak, I might make a Caesar salad. Experiment with different greens, veggies and combinations of flavors - fresh herbs add great pops of flavor to salad dressings. If you have a favorite way to prepare your salad greens, please email me at lindadansbury@comcast.net so I can share it with the rest of the members.
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
May 29, 2016
Give me Peas...and Strawberries!
Other News
By Linda Dansbury
Peas and strawberries give us the first opportunity to go out to the field for U-Pick. Here are some tips to make the time in the field enjoyable:
  • Wear comfortable clothes, shoes/boots and sunscreen - it can be very hot, cool, rainy on any given day
  • Most crops mature starting at the bottom of the plant so for things like peas, green beans, cherry tomatoes and edamame look for mature veggies lower to the ground, especially when we start picking
  • Be gentle when picking, holding onto the stem with one hand and the veggie/fruit with the other and gently pull the veggie/fruit off
  • The crops sometimes fall into the aisles - please walk around - don't trample the plants
  • Pick only what is listed on the U-pick board and only during your pick up week
  • Please teach your children the same guidelines, keeping them in the aisles between the rows and showing them how to gently pick the crop
By following these simple guidelines you and those coming to pick after you will have a fun, rewarding experience.
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
May 29, 2016
Kohlrabi and Lettuce
Other News
By Linda Dansbury
Due to vacation, I am writing this 2 weeks ahead of this week's harvest distribution. Derek and Dana did their weekly field walk and took a very educated guess on what would be available the week of May 30th. Early in the season this is difficult because early crops are very dependent on sun and warmth to reach maturity - elements which have not been reliable at all this spring.
Kohlrabi is one of the new veggies likely to be seen which kind of resembles a spaceship. It is in the same family as radishes and the delicious white turnips you have been seeing in the pick up room so the taste profile is similar. Kohlrabi keeps for a long time in the fridge, but the longer it stays, the stronger the flavor becomes. Kohlrabi is normally peeled prior to eating, but I have seen Derek noshing on kohlrabi, skin and all! I like it raw with or without a sprinkle of salt - I eat it often with lunch or as a snack while preparing dinner. It is great as part of a crudite platter and delicious as a component of slaw - julienne it along with some of the greens, such as kale and chard and make your favorite cole slaw dressing - one of mine happens to be Asian Style Cole Slaw. There are many recipes on this site for kohlrabi in cooked versions, but this time of year, for me, the mild taste is best when eaten raw.
Lettuces are now making their full appearance and I will feature them in the future but a couple of notes now - the lettuces grown on the farm have so much more flavor than store purchased lettuce - nuances that you don't want to cover up with thick, store purchased dressings. Making your own is really simple. Take a jar with a tight-fitting lid (or a small bowl and whisk). All you absolutely need is a ratio of 1/4 of you favorite vinegar to 3/4 part olive oil, salt and fresh ground pepper to taste - a bit of added Dijon mustard helps emulsify. Shake or whisk until emulsified and lightly dress the greens. Yum!
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
May 22, 2016
More on Greens - tops, stems and other trimmings
Other News
By Linda Dansbury
Turnips and radishes are delicious - you may not realize that the tops of both of these are not only edible, they are delicious, so don't throw them away. They can be added to soups, stews or sauteed like you do broccoli raab - heat a large saute pan, add garlic and red pepper flakes and cook for a minute - don't let the garlic burn. Add a large pile of chopped mixed greens and keep moving around in the pan. They can be eaten as is, or to bulk it up and make a meal out of it add a can of white beans (or other cooked protein) and serve with pasta or rice. Top with grated cheese if desired.
Stems from kale, chard, onion roots, stems from herbs, etc can be used as a veggie stock base. Place them in a freezer bag in the freezer and keep adding your trimmings until you have enough to make stock - check out the Vegetable Stock recipe on this site for a larger list of what to keep.
For greens that you just can't use in a short period of time, here is an easy way to save them, which I learned from a fellow member. Bring a large pot of water to a boil. While you are waiting for it to boil, prepare the greens you want to save by removing stems and rough chopping any large leaves. Place the greens in a large colander and place in the sink. When the water comes to a full boil, slowly pour over the greens. Let the greens cool enough to handle, then squeeze out as much water as you can, keeping the greens in a fist-sized ball. Place the ball(s) in a freezer storage bag in the freezer. Later, when making soups, stews or saute's, just remove the amount you want.
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
May 22, 2016
Green, greens, and more greens!
Other News
By Linda Dansbury
The first few harvests are always predominantly greens - they take much less time to mature and tolerate and actually prefer cooler temperatures than vegetables such as eggplant, peppers and tomatoes. If you didn't read last week's newsletter and this is your first pick up week, go back and read it for tips on how to store and enjoy the pea shoots. Use this site as a resource for ideas and recipes. When you pull up this website, click on Member's Page. Across the top there will be several tabs. Click on Search. A pull down bar will be there - click on it and select Recipes. Type in the veggie you want and hit return and a list of recipes will appear. We hope this helps.
Greens that come from the farm this time of year are delicate and delicious. Below is a summary of what can be done with some of the greens we are receiving so far. When making salads, mix the greens together for wonderful taste combinations.
Arugula - will keep for about of week in the fridge. Delicious in salads, either on its own simply dressed with good quality olive oil, a squeeze of lemon juice, salt and pepper. Arugula is also considered an herb in the culinary world. Its peppery taste is great to pep up things such as pasta salad - just chop up the arugula and add to the pasta salad. If you want to use it in a hot dish, it is best just wilted such as when making pasta. Right after draining the pasta, add chopped arugula and let it wilt into the hot pasta. Finally, it makes amazing pesto - recipe on this site!
Kale - will keep for up to 2 weeks stored in a plastic bag in the fridge. A lot of people juice and smoothie their kale (and other greens), but if that's all you do with it you are missing out. Kale makes wonderful salads, especially Caesar. Remove the tough stems, stack the leaves, roll them up and slice thin. When you have the kale all sliced, place in a bowl and message the leaves - they will turn soft and almost satin-like in texture. Then dress with your favorite dressing - I used to make Caesar dressing, but found a bottled one that is delicious and healthy - it is OPA Caesar and is found with other brands of refrigerated dressings. Kale can be cooked in countless recipes - search this site for them. Baby kale can be simply wilted in stir fries, soups, stews or even added to salads and eaten raw.
Chard - will store for up to 2 weeks in a plastic bag in fridge. When the stems are removed the leaves can be used in virtually any cooked recipe that calls for spinach. On this site there are recipes that include chard and other greens for pasta with greens, soups, salads and more. Check them out to try them or inspire you.
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
May 15, 2016
A new season and new crop
Other News
By Linda Dansbury
It is of course the first harvest of everything this week, but even after all these years of being an Anchor Run member, I still am still often surprised by what our farmers provide for us. This year it is pea shoots! You may be wondering what you can do with pea shoots, or why even bother with them?
Pea shoots are very nutritious, containing high amounts of vitamin C and antioxidants. Store them in a plastic bag in the crisper drawer of your fridge and they are best used within a few days since they are fairly fragile. They can be eaten raw as a garnish for vegetables or a final topping on stir fries. They are also delicious as a component in mixed green salads. They can also be quickly cooked in a stir fry - they should be added last because they are delicate. Here is a very simple method for stir frying the pea shoots - I prefer not to use additional seasonings such as soy sauce or oyster sauce because I like the taste of the pea shoots.
Smash 2 garlic cloves and peel and cut into julienne about 1/2 inch of ginger. 1/4 teaspoon or so of red pepper flakes are optional. Tear the peas shoots into pieces about 2" long. In a non-stick fry pan or wok, heat about a tablespoon of canola or peanut oil. Add the garlic, ginger and red pepper flakes if using and keep it moving and frying for 1-2 minutes. Add the pea shoots and stir fry until leaves are barely wilted - only 1 minute. That's it! A tasty and beautiful side dish on the table in about 5 minutes. Enjoy.
For the other items that everyone is receiving this week, please use the website for recipes. Here are a few that I particularly like: Spinach Salad with warm Bacon Dressing - you can use both the spinach and the chard for this recipe. The arugula can be added to many cooked dishes, such as soups and stews. It can be made into Arugula Pesto. I love it as its own salad - it is delicious with sliced mushrooms and a simple squeeze of fresh lemon and drizzle of good olive oil and salt and pepper to taste. One mention on the turnips and radishes - when you get them home, separate the leaves from the roots and store in separate plastic bag - don't throw them away! They are delicious sauteed along with the turnips or on their own. In this day and age, you probably have your own favorite recipes for kale and other items, so please email at lindadansbury@comcast.net. It really helps us be a community of sharing ideas on enjoying the harvest!
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
December 20, 2015
Another Season Extension
Other News
By Derek McGeehan
Due to the mild fall and winter we still have an abundance of crops to harvest fresh on the farm including several varieties of kale, arugula, greens mix, collards, napa and regular cabbage, tatsoi, bok choy, rutabaga, radishes, and turnips as well as storage crops like potatoes, garlic, celeriac, beets, turnips, radishes, rutabaga, and kohlrabi. We're also excited about cut-and-come-again greens like spinach, mix, raab, arugula, and kale. Nothing improves the sweet flavor of vegetables like the cold of fall and winter!
We are planning to offer CSA shares on a weekly basis throughout the rest of the winter until we run out of produce or temperatures drop low enough to actually end the growing season. Shares will cost $30 per week and need to be paid for when you pick up your produce (cash or check payable to Anchor Run CSA only). On the weekend prior to each pick up we will e-mail you what is in the expected harvest and you will have to respond by 12am midnight Monday if you want a share that week.
This will give us great experience with growing and distributing produce throughout the winter months (and into spring?) and move us closer to fulfilling our dream of a year round CSA. The pick up day will be Wednesdays 1-8pm and the first share will be January 6th. Shares will include fresh greens and roots and storage roots and tubers and should include around 10 items or 10 pounds of produce. Your comments or suggestions are welcome.
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
December 13, 2015
Fall ideas for Hakurei Turnips and Kohlrabi
Other News
By Linda Dansbury
It seems that most of the time I focus newsletters on methods that will not heat up the kitchen - with this weather I guess I should be doing the same thing!
However, my cooking methods shift in the fall/winter so when Derek sent me this week's harvest I thought about the kohlrabi and hakurei turnips and how I will use them. Both can be eaten raw as a snack or sliced thin and added to salads - which is something I know I have discussed in the past. Here are a couple of things you might not know:
Kohlrabi - they are delicious roasted! I have most often combined them with other fall veggies when roasting, but they are great roasted by themselves. Cut into slices about 1/4" thick and then cut into half moons. Toss in olive oil, sliced garlic, salt and pepper and spread in a single layer on a cookie sheet. Roast in a 450 degree oven for 15-20 min turning occasionally to brown evenly. Remove from oven and sprinkle with grated parmesan cheese. Place back in oven for about 5 minutes or until cheese is melted and slightly browned. Very yummy!!
Hakurei Turnips - if your family likes glazed carrots, this method is likely to be a success! If turnips have tops, remove and reserve. Place turnips into a saute pan and place water halfway up the sides of the turnips. Add about 1 Tablespoon each of butter and sugar and a good pinch of salt. Bring to a boil and simmer, stirring occasionally until tender and liquid is getting syrupy. If turnips are tender before liquid is syrupy, remove turnips to a serving plate and cook liquid down a bit. When to a nice consistency, add the turnip greens (or other if no turnip tops - such as escarole or endive) and cook until just wilted. Add the greens to the plate and serve.
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
November 15, 2015
Welcome to the Winter CSA
Other News
By Linda Dansbury
This year we have decided to expand the newsletter during the Winter CSA. We find ourselves cooking differently starting at this time of the year for a couple of reasons: it is colder and darker, so the body craves richer, stronger flavors; and, we cook differently for and with family and friends for the holidays.
I will have a column or 2 when there are new items and when I cook something that is different - especially if it is fitting to serve as part of a holiday meal. Although we won't formally have Members Ideas and Suggestions for this 6 week CSA, if you have a recipe that is special in your family for the holidays and incorporates the bounty of Anchor Run, please send it to me at lindadansbury@comcast.net.
We are not receiving a new veggie this week, but I do want to mention the kale we received last week, because it is more tender, almost delicate, so it needs to be treated differently than the kale we receive the rest of the year. It is excellent in stir fries - try it in the Easy Korean Beef recipe that is on this site. Delicious and fast and easy!
I assisted in a winter squash demo at the Wrightstown Farmers Market yesterday and made a recipe that was easy, but delicious - a lot of people that tried it plan on making it. Not only is it delicious - it is also really beautiful! It is called Honey Glazed Roasted Squash. If you still have your delicata squash, the skin doesn't have to be peeled and it looks especially beautiful. Enjoy
share on Facebook share on Twitter link
spacer
spacer