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from the Field

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March 31, 2017
Ledamete Grass Farm's Pastured Meat CSA
Other News
Would you like to eat the BEST organically-raised and pastured chicken, pork, and beef? Ledamete Grass Farm offers a chicken and also a pork share with pick up at our farm. Each month over the course of our season they'll also set up a monthly market stand, but there are discounts for joining their CSA. Drop offs for their meat CSA also occur once a month for 6 months. For more information and to sign up follow this link to their website.
Ledamete farmers and family
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March 31, 2017
Wild For Salmon Buying Club Order
Other News
We're once again partnering with local fishermen, fishing family, fishing company Wild For Salmon, who trek to Alaska each summer to participate in the sustainable salmon catch in Bristol Bay. They also sell other Alaskan fish, shellfish, and other aquatic products.
For more information and to place your order, please follow this link. The fish is amazing!
Orders are due by 11pm Sunday 4/23 and are scheduled to be picked up at the farm on Wednesday 4/26 10am-12noon. If you cannot pick up during this timeframe please contact us at anchorruncsa@gmail.com to coordinate an alternate pick up time.
If you have any questions about ordering or their products please contact info@wildforsalmon.com
Fisherfolk Steve and Jenn on their boat in Alaska
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March 31, 2017
CSA Information and Reminders
Other News
- A $200 deposit is due when you sign up to secure your share (also confirms your interest)
- CSA share balance is due by May 1st - Log in to check your balance
- CSA Open House and New Member Orientation 10am-2pm Sunday May 7th with field/u-pick and barn/pick-up tours on the hour and half hour, respectively, with a total of 4 tours of each (so you only really need to hang out for about an hour; more information will follow)
- Work hour opportunities will probably begin in mid-April. Look for an e-mail from us announcing a schedule.
- CSA pick up will probably begin either Monday May 15th or Monday May 22nd, depending on the spring weather. When you signed up for your share you selected a pick-up day; log in to check your selection if you've forgotten. If you're a half share owner and are a returning member you'll have the same pick up week as last year; if you're a new half share owner you'll be assigned Week A or Week B before the season begins. Log in to check your week, too.
Field Manager/Crew Leader Hannah, her mom Becky, and farm dog Borchie brainstorm and assess new flower garden and CSA member habitat outside of pick up room.
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February 20, 2017
Late Fall and Winter Survey
Other News
Help us improve our/your Late Fall and Winter CSAs by filling out this very brief survey which can be found here.
Springtime in February, temperatures in the 60s, warm sun, bare feet, and mud.
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February 12, 2017
Thank You For Your Support!
Other News
"THANK YOU Winter CSA members for supporting us during our inaugural January and February share! Much appreciation and love from Hannah, Dana, Abigail, Derek, and Gabriel."
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February 5, 2017
Celeriac Fries
Other News
This was passed along by Winter CSA member Lori Bittner-Barnaby: Celeriac Fries
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February 5, 2017
Sign Up For 2017 Main Season And Help Us Plan For Membership Numbers
Other News
Log in to the website to purchase your Main Season summer share and mail your $200 deposit to secure your spot. Thank you for your continued support! Spread the good word to other past, present, and future members!
Interested in helping promote our CSA by hanging the above flyer around your community? Let us know!
We can look forward to fresh snow and snap peas in spring 2017 (this scene is from 2016).
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January 29, 2017
Sign Up For 2017 Main Season And Help Us Plan For Membership Numbers
Other News
Log in to the website to purchase your Main Season share and mail your $200 deposit to secure your spot. Thank you for your continued support! Spread the good word to other past, present, and future members!
This share was distributed at the end of July 2016.
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January 22, 2017
Sign Up For 2017 Main Season And Help Us Plan For Membership Numbers
Other News
Log in to the website to purchase your Main Season share and mail your $200 deposit to secure your spot. Thank you for your continued support!
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December 18, 2016
Sign Up for the Winter CSA
Other News
By Derek McGeehan
This is the final pick up week for the Late Fall CSA.
The Winter CSA begins on Wednesday January 4th and runs for 8 weeks until the end of February. We're aiming for Winter CSA harvests to contain a nice mixture of fresh greens and storage crops, similar to what you've been receiving in the Late Fall shares.
The 2017 Main Season will begin in mid-May and will run for 26 weeks again. We're anticipating another great harvest season and are excited to implement more positive changes to further improve your farm and food experience.
A cold winter's day on the farm
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December 11, 2016
Sign Up for 2017 Winter CSA and 2017 Main Season CSA
Other News
By Derek McGeehan
Including this one, there are two more weeks of pick up for the Late Fall CSA. The last day to pick up is Wednesday 12/21 and Saturday 12/24. The Winter CSA begins on Wednesday January 4th and runs for 8 weeks until the end of February. We're aiming for Winter CSA harvests to contain a nice mixture of fresh greens and storage crops, similar to what you've been receiving in the Late Fall shares.
The 2017 Main Season will begin in mid-May and will run for 26 weeks again. We're anticipating another great harvest season and are excited to implement more positive changes to further improve your farm and food experience.
A cold, cloudy, wintry day on the farm, preparing for impending temperature dips, protecting cold-tolerant crops with hoops and row cover, and harvesting more sensitive ones.
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December 4, 2016
Sign Up for 2017 Winter CSA and 2017 Main Season CSA
Other News
By Derek McGeehan
Including this one, there are three more weeks of pick up for the Late Fall CSA. The last day to pick up is Wednesday 12/21 and Saturday 12/24. The Winter CSA begins on Wednesday January 4th and runs for 8 weeks until the end of February. We're aiming for Winter CSA harvests to contain a nice mixture of fresh greens and storage crops, similar to what you've been receiving in the Late Fall shares.
The 2017 Main Season will begin in mid-May and will run for 26 weeks again. We're anticipating another great harvest season and are excited to implement more positive changes to further improve your farm and food experience.
Farm dog Borchie faces south toward the warmth of the morning sun and reminds you to sign up soon for the future CSA seasons!
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November 20, 2016
A Note on Cauliflower
Other News
By Linda Dansbury
If you find you have a lot of cauliflower, and are not sure what to do with it, consider how many options you have: raw as a snack, steamed or boiled till desired tenderness, made into a soup, boiled until soft and then mash it as you would potatoes, and roasted. Here is an easy way to roast your caulifower for a delicious side dish:
Heat oven to 400 degrees. Slice or cut cauliflower into pieces larger than bite sized - the more surface area you have on the sheet pan, the better. Slice a garlic clove or 2 and toss it along with the cauliflower in some olive oil - salt and pepper and thyme if desired. Roast, turning occassionly until not quite tender. Take out of the oven and sprinkle with some grated parmesan cheese. Return to the oven until cauliflower is tender and cheese is melted. Enjoy!
Hey, that's a nice head of cauliflower (next to a quart container for perspective).
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November 6, 2016
Sign Up Now For Extended CSA Seasons!
Other News
By Derek McGeehan
It's time to sign up for our 5th annual Late Fall CSA as well as our inaugural Winter CSA to receive your supply of fresh, local, and organic produce through the dark winter months!
Enrollment in these seasons is limited and will be filled on a first-come first-serve basis.
To participate in these seasons, please Log in to the website and click the green 'Join' buttons on the left hand side of your member page.
2016 Late Fall CSA:
  • 6 weeks of fresh and storage crops from weeks 11/13/16 through 12/18/16
  • weekly full shares ($180) and biweekly half shares ($100) available
  • share distribution on Wednesdays 1-8pm (except for Tuesday 11/22/16) and Saturdays 11am-12noon
  • should include a variety of crops like beets, potatoes, radishes, turnips, sweet potatoes, leeks, garlic, scallions, lettuce, radicchio, cabbage, napa cabbage, arugula, mizuna, mustard greens, kale, collards, chard, spinach, herbs, etc.
2017 Winter CSA:
  • 8 weeks of fresh and storage crops from weeks 1/1/17 through 2/19/17
  • weekly full shares ($240) and biweekly half shares ($130) available
  • share distribution on Wednesdays 1-8pm and Saturdays 11am-12noon
  • should include a variety of crops like beets, potatoes, radishes, turnips, sweet potatoes, leeks, garlic, scallions, lettuce, cabbage, napa cabbage, arugula, mizuna, mustard greens, kale, collards, chard, spinach, herbs, etc.
Found inside our optionally heated greenhouse, this praying mantis is welcoming you to participate in the extended CSA seasons.
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November 6, 2016
Workshifts For Week of 11/6 - GARLIC!
Other News
By Derek McGeehan
It's garlic planting and mulching time! This is the final crop we'll be planting outside this year, and we won't harvest it until July 2017. Three hundred pounds of cloves will be planted 6 inches apart in 3 rows over eleven 180-foot beds. How many cloves is that? 11,880. After we plant the garlic we'll mulch it with straw to protect and insulate the soil over the winter months and smother weeds come spring and summer.
Workshift sign-up instructions may be found here.
Shifts:
Tuesday 11/8 9:15-11:15am & 1-3pm
Wednesday 11/9 10am-12noon & 1-3pm
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November 6, 2016
Endive, Escarole, Radicchio - AKA Chicory
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By Linda Dansbury
While in the pick up room this past week, we had a discussion about endive, which was beautifully sitting in its bin, waiting to be picked up. A member asked how to use it because she finds it just too bitter to eat. Derek and I both starting waxing poetic about how much we love this green - he puts 2 heads into his and Dana's smoothies each day - the smoothie mixture overcomes the bitterness and it is delicious - he also said it is a great liver detoxifier - sounds like a great reason to gobble it up just for that!
Both endive and escarole are bitter when eaten raw, on their own. But both are equally happy when mixed with other things and/or when cooked, which makes them much milder tasting.
My German grandmother used to make endive salads - she would soak the endive in warm water to remove some of the bitterness. She would make a dressing of lemon juice, a mild oil, celery salt and pepper - and she would sprinkle some fresh chopped parsley over the top. It was especially delicious with rich foods, such as beef stew - or turkey!
Escarole, endive's close cousin, is what was traditionally used in Italian Wedding Soup - growing up, my Italian grandmother called it Escarole Soup.
Both endive and escarole can be cooked in a pan with olive oil, garlic and a sliced hot pepper (from your freezer, remember?) or red pepper flakes, like many of you have done with many of the other greens. Or, add them to your soups and stews for added nutrients and color.
Embrace these 2 versatile, nutritious greens!
Not too bitter for this praying mantis, radicchio is a truly appealing vegetable.
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October 30, 2016
Greens, Greens and yes, More Greens
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By Linda Dansbury
After the many years I have been a member of Anchor Run, I am still learning so much about eating locally and how to best enjoy the harvests.
This week I focused on catching up on my harvests and using greens - which took some time but it was fun making the large pots of soup and filling my freezer with easy meals for dark, cold winter nights.
As I have said many times, greens are interchangeable, so if a recipe calls for kale, but you have chard, that's fine. Add mizuna, endive, escarole to any soup or stew to boost the nutrition, and add color to the pot.
I really love receiving the chicories: endive, escarole, radicchio because they are equally happy in a salad or cooked.
I usually do a mix of greens for salads - in the fall and winter, a mix of endive, escarole, mizuna, leaf lettuce with your favorite vinaigrette is delicious - these heartier, slightly bitter greens are delicious with "add-ins" - they welcome the sweetness of thinly sliced local apples or pears, dried cranberries, pomegranate arils, and nuts such as almonds and pecans. A crumble of feta or blue cheese on these salads is also delicious - with a salad that is this large and loaded with flavor, I often just have this with a simply prepared piece of meat.
Enjoy your greens!
Frosted greens slowly warming up in the morning sunshine.
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October 30, 2016
Ledamete's Turkey and Stocking Up Sale!
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Ledamete Grass Farm
Thanksgiving is quickly approaching and we're sure to sell out! Reserve your turkey today to be sure we have one for you.
We'll have a "Stock Up" Market in conjunction with our turkey pick up on Nov. 22nd 4-7pm so you can be sure to enjoy our pastured chicken, forest & pasture-raised pork, and 100% grassfed beef all winter long!
Click here for a full inventory listing and to order. Available for purchase now:
Pasture & Forest-Raised Pork
Pastured Poultry
100% Grassfed Beef
STOCKING UP ORDER DEADLINE- MIDNIGHT ON NOVEMBER 2ND!
Turkey & Stocking Up Market Date: Tuesday, Nov. 22nd from 4-7pm * Pre-orders ONLY!
Want to see what we are up to day to day on the farm? Follow us on Facebook!
Your Farmers,
The Fix Family
5471 Sell Rd.
Schnecksville, PA 18078
ledametegrassfarm.com
farmers@ledametegrassfarm.com
610-767-4984
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October 30, 2016
Workshifts For Week of 10/30
Other News
By Derek McGeehan
Wow, so now that we're almost in November there are only a few more farm tasks that we'll need some help with. If you're not planning to work this season, please remit the balance of your share cost soon (shares are discounted when you help us on the farm). Half shares work 4 hours, full shares work 8 hours, over the course of the entire season. To "buy-out" of your work hours at $15/hour, please send a check payable to "Anchor Run CSA" at 2578 2nd Street Pike, Wrightstown, PA 18940. Please don't feel guilty about this option!
As of now no workshifts are scheduled for this week.
Workshift sign-up instructions may be found here.
Thank you!
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October 30, 2016
Sign Up for Extended Seasons - Saturday Pick Up Added
Other News
By Derek McGeehan
It's time to sign up for our 5th annual Late Fall CSA as well as our inaugural Winter CSA to receive your supply of fresh, local, and organic produce through the dark winter months!
Enrollment in these seasons is limited and will be filled on a first-come first-serve basis. Current Main Season CSA shareholders will be given priority until November 1, 2016, when the general public will be able to enroll. We want to fill these CSA seasons with our current members but need to reach a critical mass for these seasons to run successfully.
To participate in these seasons, please Log in to the website and click the green 'Join' buttons on the left hand side of your member page.
2016 Late Fall CSA:
  • 6 weeks of fresh and storage crops from weeks 11/13/16 through 12/18/16
  • weekly full shares ($180) and biweekly half shares ($100) available
  • share distribution on Wednesdays 1-8pm (except for Tuesday 11/22/16) and Saturdays 11am-12noon
  • should include a variety of crops like beets, potatoes, radishes, turnips, sweet potatoes, leeks, garlic, scallions, lettuce, radicchio, cabbage, napa cabbage, arugula, mizuna, mustard greens, kale, collards, chard, spinach, herbs, etc.
2017 Winter CSA:
  • 8 weeks of fresh and storage crops from weeks 1/1/17 through 2/19/17
  • weekly full shares ($240) and biweekly half shares ($130) available
  • share distribution on Wednesdays 1-8pm and Saturdays 11am-12noon
  • should include a variety of crops like beets, potatoes, radishes, turnips, sweet potatoes, leeks, garlic, scallions, lettuce, cabbage, napa cabbage, arugula, mizuna, mustard greens, kale, collards, chard, spinach, herbs, etc.
An uplifting mix of vegetable crops will nourish us through the cold months!
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October 23, 2016
The sweets, and other things are here!
Other News
By Linda Dansbury
Sweet potatoes are here! Proper storage is important for keeping sweets for any period of time. Sweet potatoes should never be stored in the fridge - the low temps cause cellular changes which effects both cooking and taste of the potatoes. They prefer to be stored at a temp range of 55-60 degrees, which is difficult to maintain. If you have a basement or garage, they are probably the best bet, although when temps really start to drop they will need to be moved inside from the garage. They also like it dark, so if you want to try and store them for any real length of time, wrap them individually in newspaper and then place in a bag or box. I have read that placing an apple in the box/bag keeps the potatoes from sprouting, but I have never tried this myself. Do not try to store the potatoes with bad bruises or open cuts - cook those immediately.
Sweets are delicious roasted - I love to do a mixed roast of the various items we receive this time of year: potatoes, leeks, sweets, celeriac, turnips, winter squash, kohlrabi. They also are delicious boiled and mashed, either alone or in combination with potatoes and celeriac.
Celeriac is a little known and under appreciated veggie, maybe because it looks a little intimidating. It is delicious both raw and cooked. They are able to store for long periods of time in plastic in the fridge. The main thing is to be careful when peeling them (however Derek and Dana don't peel them). Cut a bit off each end and then sit it on the cutting board and with a sharp knife slice/peel down the sides, trying not to take much of the flesh. Then slice or chopped as desired. There are several recipes on this site, including Celeriac Remoulade and Celeriac and Potato/Leek Puree.
Napa cabbage - We have been receiving different cabbages over the past several weeks - have you wondered what the differences are and if they are interchangeable? The "regular" green/red, round cabbage with the smooth leaves is the strongest tasting and takes the longest to cook to get to be tender, if you are going that route vs using in a slaw. The next one is savoy, which is also round, but with pretty, crinkled leaves. It is less strong and cooks a bit faster than green/red cabbage. Napa is the mildest and fastest cooking of the 3 and is the choice for stir fries and other Asian dishes. They all store very well when in plastic in the fridge.
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October 23, 2016
Sign Up For 2016 Late Fall and 2017 Winter CSAs
Other News
By Derek McGeehan
It's time to sign up for our 5th annual Late Fall CSA as well as our inaugural Winter CSA to receive your supply of local and organic produce through the dark winter months!
Enrollment in these seasons is limited and will be filled on a first-come first-serve basis. Current Main Season CSA shareholders will be given priority until November 1, 2016, when the general public will be able to enroll. We want to fill these CSA seasons with our current members but need to reach a critical mass for these seasons to run successfully.
Also, we're currently re-evaluating the best pick up day/time for Fall and Winter seasons, so please let us know if our proposed schedule does not work for you. See below for details!
To participate in these seasons, please Log in to the website and click the green 'Join' buttons on the left hand side of your member page.
We're currently filling up our protective hoop house, high tunnel, and greenhouse with lettuce mix, arugula, kale, spinach, scallions, chard, mizuna, and mustard mix to ensure a steady supply of fresh greens through the winter! Beat the cold and flu season by eating the nutritionally beneficial crops that we grow!
2016 Late Fall CSA:
  • 6 weeks of fresh and storage crops from weeks 11/13/16 through 12/18/16
  • weekly full shares ($180) and biweekly half shares ($100) available
  • share distribution on Wednesdays 1-8pm (except for Tuesday 11/22/16)
  • should include a variety of crops like beets, potatoes, radishes, turnips, sweet potatoes, leeks, garlic, scallions, lettuce, radicchio, cabbage, napa cabbage, arugula, mizuna, mustard greens, kale, collards, chard, spinach, herbs, etc.
2017 Winter CSA:
  • 8 weeks of fresh and storage crops from weeks 1/1/17 through 2/19/17
  • weekly full shares ($240) and biweekly half shares ($130) available
  • share distribution on Wednesdays 1-8pm
  • should include a variety of crops like beets, potatoes, radishes, turnips, sweet potatoes, leeks, garlic, scallions, lettuce, cabbage, napa cabbage, arugula, mizuna, mustard greens, kale, collards, chard, spinach, herbs, etc.
A Bucks County farm scene - courtesy of Mary Liz - with late-fall kale, collards, scallions, arugula, radishes, lettuces, and mustard mix accentuating the mid-fall golden deciduous leaves.
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October 16, 2016
Sign Up For 2016 Late Fall and 2017 Winter CSAs
Other News
By Derek McGeehan
Sign up now on the members' page to secure your spot in our 2016 Late Fall CSA and 2017 Winter CSA!
To run these seasons successfully we need to reach a critical mass of membership. As of now registration is only available to current 2016 Main Season members (i.e. you) and soon we'll open it up to the general public if we don't reach our goals (we want to reach these goals with you included).
We cap these seasons at about 25% of the Main Season membership size so please sign up to reserve your spot today!
Also, we're currently re-evaluating the best pick up day/time for Fall and Winter seasons, so please let us know if our proposed schedule does not work for you. The Late Fall CSA typically mimics one Main Season pick-up-days worth of members, about 100-120 shareholders, so we're okay with keeping a 1-8pm pick up window on Wednesdays. However, January and February being more difficult weather months and the fact that we're using this season experimentally and keeping membership numbers lower, we're probably going to move the Winter CSA pick up to Saturday daytime. Please give us some feedback if you wish!
2016 Late Fall CSA:
  • 6 weeks of fresh and storage crops from weeks 11/13/16 through 12/18/16
  • vegetables should include greens like arugula, spinach, mizuna, kale, collards, cabbage, napa cabbage, endive, escarole, lettuce, chard, and beet greens; roots like carrots, turnips, beets, radishes, potatoes, sweet potatoes, and kohlrabi; storage crops like onions and garlic; and freshly harvested alliums like chives, leeks, and scallions
  • cold hardy vegetables grown outside with use of low hoops and row cover
  • weekly full shares ($180) and biweekly half shares ($100) available
  • share distribution on Wednesdays 1-8pm (except for Tuesday 11/22/16)
2017 Winter CSA:
  • 8 weeks of fresh and storage crops from weeks 1/1/17 through 2/19/17
  • vegetables should include greens like arugula, spinach, mizuna, kale, collards, cabbage, napa cabbage, lettuce mix, chard, and beet greens; roots like carrots, turnips, beets, radishes, potatoes, sweet potatoes, and kohlrabi; storage crops like onions and garlic; and freshly harvested alliums like chives, leeks, and scallions
  • cold hardy vegetables grown inside of hoop house, high tunnel, and greenhouse
  • weekly full shares ($240) and biweekly half shares ($130) available
  • share distribution on Wednesdays 1-8pm (this may change to Saturday daytime)
The final pass with the tractor and raised bed maker will make a nice home for winter greens like kale and arugula. Shortly after this shot was taken we moved the high tunnel one position downhill to protect the soon-to-be-sown greens for the winter. It protected the heirloom tomatoes over the summer.
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October 16, 2016
Ledamete Grass Farm's Monthly Market October 20, preorder now!
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Ledamete Grass Farm
Ledamete Grass Farm will be at Anchor Run Farm for a market day on Thursday, October 20 from 1-5pm*!
*If you can't make that day/time, pre-orders can be left in the freezer for you to pick up on your next share day (you have 2 weeks to pick it up).
Order Your Pastured Meats Today- Deadline Midnight October 19!
100% Grassfed Beef
Pasture & Forest Raised Pork
Pastured Chicken
PRE-ORDERS preferred but day of sales will be welcomed.
To learn more about our farming practices, read below, visit our website, and check us out on Facebook. . To order visit our e-commerce site here.
Ledamete Grass Farm Pasture & Forest-Raised Pork
We raise Tamworth cross heritage breed pigs, as they thrive in the forest and field and are known for their excellent flavor. In addition to forage, our pigs are fed local grain raised with organic methods, organic veggie compost, and grass-fed raw dairy products.
Ledamete Grass Farm Pastured Poultry
Our chickens and turkeys are raised on pasture with constant access to fresh bugs, herbs and grasses. In addition to the forage they find, we provide our birds with grain, grown and milled fresh by a local farmer who utilizes organic methods. The birds' access to fresh air, exercise, sunshine, green grass and bugs creates very delicious and nutritious meat!
Ledamete Grass Farm 100% Grassfed Beef
We raise Rotakawa Devon/Jersey Cross beef as they do very well on 100% grass. This meat is nutrient dense and delicious!
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October 16, 2016
Workshifts For Week of 10/16
Other News
By Derek McGeehan
Now that we're into October there is about one month left of workshift opportunities for you to satisfy the work component of your CSA share. If you're not planning to work this season, please remit the balance of your share cost soon. Half shares work 4 hours, full shares work 8 hours, over the course of the entire season. To "buy-out" of your work hours at $15/hour, please send a check payable to "Anchor Run CSA" at 2578 2nd Street Pike, Wrightstown, PA 18940. Please don't feel guilty about this option!
Shifts this week:
Tuesday 10/18 9-11am
Wednesday 10/19 10am-12noon
Friday 10/21 10am-12noon
Saturday 10/22 10am-12noon
Sunday 10/23 12noon-2pm (garlic processing in barn)
Workshift sign-up instructions may be found here.
Thank you!
Notoriously slow to germinate and grow, baby carrots are difficult to cultivate because weeds easily outpace them. Here, Hannah is confirming their presence in their respective rows and will cultivate between rows.
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October 9, 2016
Fall abundance
Other News
By Linda Dansbury
Two things really hit me as I sat to write this morning. Each week, Derek emails me with the expected harvest for the week. He titles the email with what pick up week it is. I was startled by the fact that it is already week 22 - it seems like such a short time ago that it was week 1! The other thing that jumped out at me is the incredible variety of veggies that are available to us at this time of year. We are fortunate to live in a climate that supports the many diverse crops it does and even luckier that we have amazing farmers that care as much a D&D and their farm staff about growing such nourishing food for us!
For ideas on how to use this variety, search this site - I still do and even if I don't select a specific recipe, I get ideas for using the veggies.
A couple notes about cabbage. First, it keeps very well when stored in a plastic bag or container in the fridge meaning that you don't need to use it within the first couple of days of picking up your share.
Cabbage is of course delicious in slaws - my family and friends love my Asian Slaw recipe. Cabbage is also delicious when cooked - check out the site, but I used cabbage in a way that doesn't require a recipe: Chop/slice it as you would for cole slaw. Melt a little butter and olive oil together and when heated, add the cabbage and saute it over med heat until it is tender and slightly browned - keep a fairly close watch, as it can burn easily. Simply salt and pepper to taste and sprinkle with fresh herb(s) such as chives, parsley and/or thyme. When cooked like this it takes on an almost sweet, nutty taste. It goes really well with pork and chicken.
We are back to receiving a lot of greens - embrace it and add them to many of the dishes that you cook - don't worry if the recipe doesn't call for them: soups, stews, chili. Saute a single green or combo with garlic, onion, a hot pepper. Add other things to suit your family's taste. Keep the tops to turnips, beets, radishes to add to all these dishes - I was amazed last night to see that I have really kept up with using my greens, even though for the most part I am only cooking for the 2 of us.
Enjoy the Abundance!
Well now who can resist a colorful photograph featuring a monarch butterfly snacking on New England aster nectar? Thanks to Mary Liz for the photo.
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October 9, 2016
Sign Up For 2016 Late Fall and 2017 Winter CSAs
Other News
By Derek McGeehan
Sign up now on the members' page to secure your spot in our 2016 Late Fall CSA and 2017 Winter CSA! For additional information please see the bulletin that was e-mailed to you this past week, log into the website and click the green "Join" buttons on the members' page, or look below.
2016 Late Fall CSA:
  • 6 weeks of fresh and storage crops from weeks 11/13/16 through 12/18/16
  • vegetables should include greens like arugula, spinach, mizuna, kale, collards, cabbage, napa cabbage, endive, escarole, lettuce, chard, and beet greens; roots like carrots, turnips, beets, radishes, potatoes, sweet potatoes, and kohlrabi; storage crops like onions and garlic; and freshly harvested alliums like chives, leeks, and scallions
  • cold hardy vegetables grown outside with use of low hoops and row cover
  • weekly full shares ($180) and biweekly half shares ($100) available
  • share distribution on Wednesdays 1-8pm (except for Tuesday 11/22/16)
2017 Winter CSA:
  • 8 weeks of fresh and storage crops from weeks 1/1/17 through 2/19/17
  • vegetables should include greens like arugula, spinach, mizuna, kale, collards, cabbage, napa cabbage, lettuce mix, chard, and beet greens; roots like carrots, turnips, beets, radishes, potatoes, sweet potatoes, and kohlrabi; storage crops like onions and garlic; and freshly harvested alliums like chives, leeks, and scallions
  • cold hardy vegetables grown inside of hoop house, high tunnel, and greenhouse
  • weekly full shares ($240) and biweekly half shares ($130) available
  • share distribution on Wednesdays 1-8pm
A site for Late Fall and Winter growing, the lettuce mix, spinach, scallions, and chard will probably end up calling the raised beds uphill home.
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October 2, 2016
2016 Late Fall CSA; 2017 Winter CSA
Other News
Sign up now on the members' page to secure your spot in our 2016 Late Fall CSA and 2017 Winter CSA! For additional information please see the bulletin that was e-mailed to you this past week, log into the website and click the green "Join" buttons on the members' page, or look below.
2016 Late Fall CSA:
  • 6 weeks of fresh and storage crops from weeks 11/13/16 through 12/18/16
  • vegetables should include greens like arugula, spinach, mizuna, kale, collards, cabbage, napa cabbage, endive, escarole, lettuce, chard, and beet greens; roots like carrots, turnips, beets, radishes, potatoes, sweet potatoes, and kohlrabi; as well as storage crops like onions, garlic, and butternut; and freshly harvested alliums like chives, leeks, and scallions
  • cold hardy vegetables grown outside with use of low hoops and row cover
  • weekly full shares ($180) and biweekly half shares ($100) available
  • share distribution on Wednesdays 1-8pm (except for Tuesday 11/22/16)
2017 Winter CSA:
  • 8 weeks of fresh and storage crops from weeks 1/1/17 through 2/19/17
  • vegetables should include greens like arugula, spinach, mizuna, kale, collards, cabbage, napa cabbage, lettuce mix, chard, and beet greens; roots like carrots, turnips, beets, radishes, potatoes, sweet potatoes, and kohlrabi; as well as storage crops like onions, garlic, and butternut; and freshly harvested alliums like chives, leeks, and scallions
  • cold hardy vegetables grown inside of hoop house, high tunnel, and greenhouse
  • weekly full shares ($240) and biweekly half shares ($130) available
  • share distribution on Wednesdays 1-8pm
A variety of fall and winter roots are looking healthy above and below ground. Traditionally we remove their tops for distribution and storage. Left to right: scarlet queen red stem, des vertus marteau, and purple top turnips; alpine daikon, watermelon, bravo daikon, and green meat radishes.
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October 2, 2016
Potluck Meal and Celebration - Sat. 10/8 5pm
Other News
Join us in celebration of the delightful arrival of autumn with a final potluck of the 2016 season on Saturday October 8th at 5pm. Bring a dish to share to feed around 6 adults plus your own place settings and beverages. We'll eat under the pavilion, enjoy the night sky and a small fire.
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September 25, 2016
Sign Up For 2016 Late Fall and 2017 Winter CSAs
Other News
By Derek McGeehan
Sign up now on the members' page to secure your spot in our 2016 Late Fall CSA and 2017 Winter CSA! For additional information please see the bulletin that was e-mailed to you this past week, log into the website and click the green "Join" buttons on the members' page, or look below.
2016 Late Fall CSA:
  • 6 weeks of fresh and storage crops from weeks 11/13/16 through 12/18/16
  • vegetables should include greens like arugula, spinach, mizuna, kale, collards, cabbage, napa cabbage, endive, escarole, lettuce, chard, and beet greens; roots like turnips, beets, radishes, potatoes, sweet potatoes, and kohlrabi; as well as storage crops like onions, garlic, and butternut; and freshly harvested alliums like chives, leeks, and scallions
  • cold hardy vegetables grown outside with use of low hoops and row cover
  • weekly full shares ($180) and biweekly half shares ($100) available
  • share distribution on Wednesdays 1-8pm (except for Tuesday 11/22/16)
2017 Winter CSA:
  • 8 weeks of fresh and storage crops from weeks 1/1/17 through 2/19/17
  • vegetables should include greens like arugula, spinach, mizuna, kale, collards, cabbage, napa cabbage, lettuce mix, chard, and beet greens; roots like turnips, beets, radishes, potatoes, sweet potatoes, and kohlrabi; as well as storage crops like onions, garlic, and butternut; and freshly harvested alliums like chives, leeks, and scallions
  • cold hardy vegetables grown inside of hoop house, high tunnel, and greenhouse
  • weekly full shares ($240) and biweekly half shares ($130) available
  • share distribution on Wednesdays 1-8pm
New England asters are blooming prolifically around the farm this time of year, satisfying many insects' late season nectar needs, such as monarch butterflies before their journey south, as well as this honeybee.
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September 25, 2016
Greens and Green Tomatoes
Other News
By Linda Dansbury
The warm temperatures have the greens in the field growing rapidly and begging to be harvested, so there will be a volume of greens that we haven't seen since the spring harvest. Greens are easy to incorporate into a lot of recipes - add to casseroles, stir fries, lasagna, pasta mixtures, sautes, and of course soups, stews and smoothies. Even many of the "stronger" greens can be made into or bits can be added to salads. Please search this website for a lot of ideas - just put the word "greens" into the search bar. The recipes have been adapted to fit the farm's harvests - that is, many of the recipes will list several greens that can be used whereas if you search the internet most of the recipes specify a green or 2.
As for green tomatoes, you can do a couple of things with them. You can let them ripen - when I was a kid, we used to pick the green tomatoes from the plants right before frost, wrapped each one in newspaper, and then left them alone. Once per week we would unwrap all of them and check to see how they were progressing.
We also have a few recipes on this site - Green Tomato Sauce over Fettuccini, Green Tomato Relish and probably the best known way to use them - Sauteed Shrimp in Remoulade Sauce with Fried Green Tomatoes.
If you have some ideas on how to use your harvest, please email me at lindadansbury@comcast.net
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September 25, 2016
A brief look into what's on the farmers' table
Other News
By Derek McGeehan
As farmers and eaters, we love to incorporate whole and simple food and meals into our diet because we're busy, like you, and have access to good quality ingredients, like you. We hear from members occasionally about their difficulty in using up a full share of produce on a weekly basis. Here, we would like to expose you to simple and easy ways of using your CSA share as we farmers do. To make a quality healthy meal is very easy; you really only need a few items like produce; meat, fish, poultry, eggs, cheese or some other kind of non-animal protein; sea salt; and a fat like coconut oil, olive oil, butter, or lard. As you become more familiar with cooking and using whole, simple ingredients you'll seldom need to follow recipes anymore. It's an enlightening and enriching endeavor. Eventually you may think most meals can be almost as good as Thanksgiving's main celebratory meal (as I like to think).
A quick and easy, extremely tasty, and incredibly healthy dinner meal:
  • 3 chopped savoy cabbages, 3 chopped bunches of chives, a tablespoon or so of sea salt, and a few tablespoons of coconut oil - roasted in a large pan at 400 degrees for an hour
  • A couple pounds of potatoes sliced into thin wedges, mixed with sea salt and some Ledamete lard, roasted on a cookie sheet at 400 degrees for an hour, with above dish
  • 3 Ledamete sausages cooked at 400 degrees for 40 minutes, with above dishes
Breakfast, about every day of the week:
  • Blend some kind of green like kale, some fruit, and mix with homemade kefir (which is made from Birchwood Dairy raw milk). A typical smoothie divided between Dana, Gabe, and me can include about 2 bunches of kale. Besides being an extremely efficient way to use up your greens, a smoothie like this is a meal and medicine in one and creates an overall sense of wellbeing.
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September 18, 2016
Workshifts Week of 9/18
Other News
By Derek McGeehan
Now that we're into the middle of September there is about one month left of workshift opportunities for you to satisfy the work component of your CSA share. If you're not planning to work this season, please remit the balance of your share cost soon. Half shares work 4 hours, full shares work 8 hours, over the course of the entire season. To "buy-out" of your work hours at $15/hour, please send a check payable to "Anchor Run CSA" at 2578 2nd Street Pike, Wrightstown, PA 18940. Please don't feel guilty about this option!
Shifts this week:
Tuesday 8-10am, 10am-12noon
Wednesday 8-10am, 10am-12noon, 6-8pm (garlic processing in barn)
Friday 8-10am, 10am-12noon
Saturday 10am-12noon
Workshift sign-up instructions may be found here.
Thank you!
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September 18, 2016
Sign Up For 2016 Late Fall and 2017 Winter CSAs
Other News
By Derek McGeehan
Sign up now on the members' page to secure your spot in our 2016 Late Fall CSA and 2017 Winter CSA! For additional information please see the bulletin that was e-mailed to you this past week, log into the website and click the green "Join" buttons on the members' page, or look below.
2016 Late Fall CSA:
  • 6 weeks of fresh and storage crops from weeks 11/13/16 through 12/18/16
  • weekly full shares ($180) and biweekly half shares ($100) available
  • share distribution on Wednesdays 1-8pm (except for Tuesday 11/22/16)
2017 Winter CSA:
  • 8 weeks of fresh and storage crops from weeks 1/1/17 through 2/19/17
  • weekly full shares ($240) and biweekly half shares ($130) available
  • share distribution on Wednesdays 1-8pm
In the foreground are blooming aster and goldenrod, part of our 2-acre pollinator habitat. In the background are a couple acres of flowering buckwheat, hopefully providing good nectar for good insects.
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September 18, 2016
Fall crops begin
Other News
By Linda Dansbury
Crops are beginning to change - you have seen this by the kale and Swiss chard in the pick up room the past couple of weeks. Salad radishes, salad turnips, and beets will be a part of our shares off and on over the next month. Lettuce also returned.
The obvious thing is to either just eat the radishes and turnips out of hand or slice and put them into salads. They are also delicious when eaten with a very simple dip. I tried this in the spring and look forward to having it again. I have posted it to the site - Radishes with Goat Cheese Dip. It is delicious with all sorts of other veggies too - and healthier than most store purchased dips. Check out this site for delicious cooked salad turnip recipes.
Summer veggies allow us to make robust and delicious salads. Slice sweet peppers, scallions, radishes and carrots, chop tomatoes and mix a simple vinaigrette. The salad is crunchy, nutritious and delicious and it has enough flavor that to make it a meal, you can add canned tuna or other flaky fish, leftover cooked chicken and even thinly slice steak and top the salad with it for a lean and tasty dinner.
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September 18, 2016
Fermentation Workshop 9/25 1-3pm
Other News
Gia Yaccarino
Fermentation Member Share Workshop Sunday, September 25, 2016 1 – 3 PM
Please join us on Sunday, September 25, 2016 for our Fermenting Workshop. Information regarding fermenting resources, websites and books will be discussed. We invite all members from the fermenting pros to the novices to join us for discussion and education on fermenting basics. This year’s fermenting workshop is meant to be focused on the members - sharing their experiences – triumphs and failures, discussing their concerns about the fermenting process and answering questions. Please join us for what promises to be a very engaging workshop!
Additionally, Gia will share some fun fermenting information she just learned while attending the 2016 Farm Aid festival!
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September 11, 2016
Maple Syrup and Honey For Sale!
Other News
Susan Klikus
Augusta Acres Farm, Susan and Todd Klikus, will be returning to Anchor Run Farm this Thursday September 15th from 1-6 pm to offer for sale their Pure Maple Syrup and their Pure, Local, Raw Honey.
Augusta Acre's maple syrup is produced from sap collected strictly on their farm and boiled down in small batches on their wood fired arch. It is Pure, Dark, Robust syrup.
Their Honey is all extracted from their farm's apiaries. It is an "All Season" honey which features a dark, very sweet flavor. It is Pure, Local and Raw.
Both maple syrup and honey will be available in pint and quart glass jars. Prices this year will be the same for both "Sweets":
Maple syrup: Pint $18 Quart $24
Honey: Pint (20 oz.) $18 Quart (40 oz.) $24
Recap reusable jar lids will also be available for $6.00.
They will be at Anchor Run from 1:00 - 6:00 PM on Thursday September 15th for tasting and pick up. Susan and Todd accept cash and personal checks made out to Augusta Acres.
Any questions and to pre-order please email Susan at susanklikus@gmail.com
Augusta Acres is a small sustainable farm located near the Delaware River in upstate PA. They practice organic methods, are members of Pennsylvania Association for Sustainable Agriculture, Pennsylvania Maple Producers Assoc., and The NE PA Beekeepers.
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September 11, 2016
Workshifts Week of 9/11
Other News
By Derek McGeehan
Now that we're into the middle of September there is about one month left of workshift opportunities for you to satisfy the work component of your CSA share. If you're not planning to work this season, please remit the balance of your share cost soon. Half shares work 4 hours, full shares work 8 hours, over the course of the entire season. To "buy-out" of your work hours at $15/hour, please send a check payable to "Anchor Run CSA" at 2578 2nd Street Pike, Wrightstown, PA 18940. Please don't feel guilty about this option!
Shifts this week:
Tuesday 8-10am, 10am-12noon
Wednesday 8-10am, 10am-12noon
Friday 8-10am, 10am-12noon
Saturday 10am-12noon
Workshift sign-up instructions may be found here.
Thank you!
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September 11, 2016
Fermentation Workshop 9/25 1-3pm
Other News
Gia Yaccarino
Fermentation Member Share Workshop Sunday, September 25, 2016 1 – 3 PM
Please join us on Sunday, September 25, 2016 for our Fermenting Workshop. Information regarding fermenting resources, websites and books will be discussed. We invite all members from the fermenting pros to the novices to join us for discussion and education on fermenting basics. This year’s fermenting workshop is meant to be focused on the members - sharing their experiences – triumphs and failures, discussing their concerns about the fermenting process and answering questions. Please join us for what promises to be a very engaging workshop!
Here, drip tape is saving the lives of our newly transplanted chard and spinach on a 95 degree September day. Because of our new drip tape winder, we're able to reuse most of the drip tape for more than one season.
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September 4, 2016
Maple Syrup and Honey For Sale!
Other News
Susan Klikus
Augusta Acres Farm, Susan and Todd Klikus, will be returning to Anchor Run Farm on Thursday September 15th to offer for sale their Pure Maple Syrup and their Pure, Local, Raw Honey.
Augusta Acre's maple syrup is produced from sap collected strictly on their farm and boiled down in small batches on their wood fired arch. It is Pure, Dark, Robust syrup.
Their Honey is all extracted from their farm's apiaries. It is an "All Season" honey which features a dark, very sweet flavor. It is Pure, Local and Raw.
Both maple syrup and honey will be available in pint and quart glass jars. Prices this year will be the same for both "Sweets":
Maple syrup: Pint $18 Quart $24
Honey: Pint (20 oz.) $18 Quart (40 oz.) $24

Recap reusable jar lids will also be available for $6.00.
They will be at Anchor Run from 1:00 - 6:00 PM on Thursday September 15th for tasting and pick up. Susan and Todd accept cash and personal checks made out to Augusta Acres.
Any questions and to pre-order please email Susan at susanklikus@gmail.com
Augusta Acres is a small sustainable farm located near the Delaware River in upstate PA. They practice organic methods, are members of Pennsylvania Association for Sustainable Agriculture, Pennsylvania Maple Producers Assoc., and The NE PA Beekeepers.
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September 4, 2016
Fermentation Workshop 9/25 1-3pm
Other News
Gia Yaccarino
Fermentation Member Share Workshop Sunday, September 25, 2016 1 – 3 PM
Please join us on Sunday, September 25, 2016 for our Fermenting Workshop. Information regarding fermenting resources, websites and books will be discussed. We invite all members from the fermenting pros to the novices to join us for discussion and education on fermenting basics. This year’s fermenting workshop is meant to be focused on the members - sharing their experiences – triumphs and failures, discussing their concerns about the fermenting process and answering questions. Please join us for what promises to be a very engaging workshop!
Another toad in the newsletter!
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September 4, 2016
Veggie Salads
Other News
By Linda Dansbury
Due to extreme heat and dry weather, there is a break in lettuce that can be harvested, so if you are a family that loves salads, you may be wondering what to do. Through the year, we eat salads almost every night, but in the summer, I find that the lettuce often gets pushed to the back of the fridge in favor of making vegetable salads. Cucumbers are of course the first, but as I mentioned last week, kale makes delicious salads - such as Kale Caesar Salad. So do carrots and tomatoes - tomatoes are one of, if not my favorite, because the "juice" (read dressing mixed with the tomato juices) at the bottom of the bowl is about the most delicious thing when sopped up with a good loaf of bread. In my family, we peeled the tomatoes, but admittedly when I am in a hurry I just cut them up into slightly larger than bite sized pieces. Add chopped sweet pepper and sliced scallions or onion. Then make a dressing with red wine vinegar, olive oil, a bit of dried oregano, salt, pepper and chopped basil or parsley. Mix up and enjoy. By the way, you can use a drop of balsamic vinegar if you want, but I prefer the lighter red wine vinegar to let the flavors of these delicious tomatoes come through.
I realize that most if not all of your carrots are being eaten out of hand as snacks, but there are 3 delicious salads on this site: Spicy Carrot Salad, Edamame and Carrot Salad with Rice Vinegar, and Lemony Carrot Salad with Dill. Try one or all as a nice change for your dinner table!
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September 4, 2016
Workshifts Week of 9/4
Other News
By Derek McGeehan
Half of your committed work hours should be completed soon! Over the course of the season full shares work 8 hours; half shares work 4 hours. If you're unable to contribute the physical portion of your share, you must contribute to the farm financially at the rate of $15/hour. This fills out the balance of your share cost.
Monday Labor Day 9/5 10am-12noon
Tuesday 9/6 8-10am; 10am-12noon
Wednesday 9/7 8-10am; 10am-12noon
Friday 9/9 8-10am; 10am-12noon
Workshift sign-up instructions may be found here.
Thank you!
Morning dew on buckwheat that is ready to flower and attract pollinators.
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August 28, 2016
Workshifts week of 8/28
Other News
By Derek McGeehan
Half of your committed work hours should be completed soon! Over the course of the season full shares work 8 hours; half shares work 4 hours. If you're unable to contribute the physical portion of your share, you must contribute to the farm financially at the rate of $15/hour. This fills out the balance of your share cost.
Tuesday 8/30 8-10am; 10am-12noon
Wednesday 8/31 8-10am; 10am-12noon; 6-8pm
Friday 9/2 8-10am; 10am-12noon
Saturday 9/3 8-10am
Monday Labor Day 10am-12noon
Workshift sign-up instructions may be found here.
Thank you!
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August 28, 2016
U Pick Winding Down, Fall Greens Returning
Other News
By Linda Dansbury
Even though it still feels like summer, the fields are starting to say fall. This week the weather will become more fall-like and the cooler night temps along with shorter days will slow down the summer crops. Please make sure you work U-pick into your schedule, because there are only a couple of weeks left to pick before the crops are finished for 2016.
Kale will make it's first appearance in a while and barring a major insect or weather event, we should see it nearly every week going forward. Since it is still quite warm, consider making Kale Caesar Salad. I find massaging the leaves into velvet, as the recipe describes to be quite relaxing. Another great way to use kale for a 1 dish meal in which we currently have all the ingredients is to remove mid ribs and roughly chop the kale; cut up potatoes into thick slices or chunks, slice onions. Put all in a large bowl and drizzle with olive oil, and salt and pepper to taste. Mix well. Place in a baking dish and top with chicken thighs and/or drumsticks that have been oiled, and salt and peppered. Cover with foil and place in a 375 degree oven for about 20 min. Remove foil and continue cooking until potatoes are tender and chicken is cooked through and slightly browned - about 15 minutes. Enjoy with a side salad of tomatoes or lettuces.
The first picking of fall kale commenced early Sunday morning. Below a few acres of woods, this field was drowned in July by the 12 inches of rain but now, after setting up and running irrigation during an extremely dry August, crops are thankfully thriving.
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August 21, 2016
Ledamete Grass Farm's Monthly Market August 25th, preorder now!
Other News
Ledamete Grass Farm will be at Anchor Run Farm for a market day on Thursday, August 25 from 1-5pm*!
*If you can't make that day/time, pre-orders can be left in the freezer for you to pick up on your next share day.
Order Your Pastured Meats Today- Deadline Midnight August 22nd!
100% Grassfed Beef
Pasture & Forest Raised Pork
Pastured Chicken
PRE-ORDERS preferred but day of sales will be welcomed.
To learn more about our farming practices, read below, visit our website, and check us out on Facebook. . To order visit our e-commerce site here. Ledamete Grass Farm Pasture & Forest-Raised Pork
We raise Tamworth cross heritage breed pigs, as they thrive in the forest and field and are known for their excellent flavor. In addition to forage, our pigs are fed local grain raised with organic methods, organic veggie compost, and grass-fed raw dairy products.
Ledamete Grass Farm Pastured Poultry
Our chickens and turkeys are raised on pasture with constant access to fresh bugs, herbs and grasses. In addition to the forage they find, we provide our birds with grain, grown and milled fresh by a local farmer who utilizes organic methods. The birds' access to fresh air, exercise, sunshine, green grass and bugs creates very delicious and nutritious meat!
Ledamete Grass Farm 100% Grassfed Beef
We raise Rotakawa Devon/Jersey Cross beef as they do very well on 100% grass. This meat is nutrient dense and delicious!
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August 21, 2016
Summer crops
Other News
By Linda Dansbury
This week we will have cured garlic in the pick up room, which means the covering around each clove has "hardened off" enough that they protect the bulbs, ie., you no longer need to refrigerate what is picked up. They still need to be stored in a reasonably cool, dry place or they will rot/dry out/sprout sooner rather than later.
For newer members, what do you do with the edamame? Well, it makes a delicious Hummus. Also, they freeze really well. I typically freeze half to 2/3 of my harvest of edamame. I shell many of them prior to freezing to save time later in the year when I dig them out of the freezer, but if I don't have time, I freeze them shell and all. One thing you may not know is that edamame can be used in place of lima beans in recipes, which is how most of mine get used up - added to soups, stews, used in succotash - they are wonderful! and so good for you.
To us, one sign of a healthy nontoxic environment is the presence of amphibians so we get fairly excited whenever we discover one. Fortunately on the farm we do see toads, frogs, and salamanders frequently and we hope this means it is a healthy and safe place, and remains that way.
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August 21, 2016
Workshifts week of 8/21
Other News
By Derek McGeehan
Half of your committed work hours should be completed soon! Over the course of the season full shares work 8 hours; half shares work 4 hours. If you're unable to contribute the physical portion of your share, you must contribute to the farm financially at the rate of $15/hour. This fills out the balance of your share cost.
Tuesday 8/23 8-10am; 10am-12noon
Wednesday 8/24 8-10am; 10am-12noon; 6-8pm
Friday 8/26 8-10am; 10am-12noon
Saturday 8/27 8-10am
Workshift sign-up instructions may be found here.
Thank you!
If you attend an evening workshift there is a good chance you'll enjoy a beautiful sky and sunset. Photo credit farmer Mary Liz.
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August 14, 2016
Okra and Hot Peppers
Other News
By Linda Dansbury
This will be the first week for hot peppers and I think most people know at least something about them. In order to determine how many to use in a recipe, prior to chopping them up and adding to a recipe, slice the pepper(s) and then touch the cut edge with your finger and taste it - be prepared for the heat to come on - but, some types have just a mild heat and taste is more fruity than hot. Like sweet peppers, they store well in plastic in the fridge. They also freeze fine. Just put them in a plastic bag or container whole and place in freezer.
Okra is an item we have only seen a few times so far this year. Okra is probably best known in this country as the essential ingredient in Gumbo, and in fact, one early name for Okra was gumbo. Okra does not keep well, so use it within a week. It does well being quickly blanched and frozen or cook it and enjoy or freeze. There are several seasonal recipes on this site, including Roasted potato and okra salad, Easy Indian-style okra stew, Okra and green beans and Louisiana shrimp gumbo - the later is a much lighter version of the better known gumbo recipes that begin with a dark rue. The bolded recipes above can be clicked on to get right to the recipes.
The intriguingly beautiful and reproductively important okra blossom on 5 foot tall and growing plants will eventually produce the edible portion of the plant, an elongated green fruit with numerous seeds.
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August 14, 2016
Workshifts for week 8/14
Other News
By Derek McGeehan
Half of your committed work hours should be completed soon! Over the course of the season full shares work 8 hours; half shares work 4 hours. If you're unable to contribute the physical portion of your share, you may contribute to the farm financially at the rate of $15/hour. This fills out the balance of your share cost.
Tuesday 8/16 8-10am; 10am-12noon
Wednesday 8/17 8-10am; 10am-12noon; 6-8pm
Friday 8/19 8-10am; 10am-12noon
Saturday 8/20 8-10am
Workshift sign-up instructions may be found here.
Thank you!
On an extremely and almost intolerably hot Friday afternoon, Hannah and Mary Liz made an attempt to seed fall crops in the shade of a beach umbrella. Seeding is a good job in hot weather. Photo credit Mary Liz Watson.
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August 7, 2016
New this week - Fresh onions. Spaghetti squash and Edamame!!
Other News
By Linda Dansbury
Wow, it is hard to believe we are already into August - the veggie assortment tells us how late it already is in the season. Three new items arrive this week - all things that I really enjoy!
Fresh Onions - not a lot I have to say about these - they are to be used as you would "cured" onions in any recipe. The only difference is these need to be stored in the refrigerator.
Spaghetti Squash - is called this because of the way the flesh separates into spaghetti-like strands when cooked. Spaghetti squash is the first of the hard shelled or winter squashes we receive and although they do store well, these will not keep as long as some of the others that will come later in the season. Store them in a cool part of your house, but not too humid - I say this because some basements are great temperature wise, but might be too humid this time of year for good storage conditions. To cook them, I have tried several suggested methods over the years and have decided that the easiest, most reliable method is to preheat over to about 375 degrees. Cut the squash lengthwise in half and scoop out the seeds. Place the squash cut side down in a deep baking dish and put enough water in the dish to cover the bottom. Bake for 25-35 minutes, or until a knife goes easily through - time is dependent on size of the squash. Remove from oven and when cool enough to handle take a fork and scrape the strands out of the shells. We have several delicious recipes on this site so please use the search feature. This time of year I would say my favorite way is to prepare the Uncooked Tomato Sauce recipe and top the hot strands of the spaghetti squash with the sauce, adding whatever cheese component you like - simple and delicious!!
Edamame - is one of the treats most anticipated by long time members. Take the time to do your U Pick - I try to plan my weekends to do U-Pick when the weather is at the best it can be - sometimes heat, humidity and T-storms make it a bit of a challenge, but you definitely don't want to miss out. The most mature pods are typically at the bottom of the plants. Pick those that have well formed beans showing through the outer shell. Store in a plastic bag until ready to prepare - I have to say that my first picking each year gets eaten up immediately, and then later pickings I get to prepare and freeze for use all winter long. Bring a large pot of water to a boil and add A LOT of salt - about 2 Tablespoons per 3 quarts of water. Add beans and be careful they don't boil over - that is the reason for mentioning a large pot - start checking for tenderness at about 9 minutes - sometimes they are ready at that point but can take up to 15 minutes. Drain and salt again - suck the pods and the beans will come right out - Yum!! I will highlight recipes in future weeks but you can search the site for delicious ways to use your edamame.
Boiled in water with a tablespoon or two of salt for 10-15 minutes renders edamame into quite a delectable snack. With a gentle squeeze the beans slide right out of their pods.
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August 7, 2016
Workshifts Week of 8/7
Other News
By Derek McGeehan
Half of your committed work hours should be completed soon! Over the course of the season full shares work 8 hours; half shares work 4 hours. If you're unable to contribute the physical portion of your share, you may contribute to the farm financially at the rate of $15/hour. This fills out the balance of your share cost.
  • Tuesday 8/9 8-10am; 10am-12noon
  • Wednesday 8/10 8-10am; 10am-12noon; 6-8pm
  • Friday 8/12 8-10am; 10am-12noon
  • Saturday 8/13 8-10am
Workshift sign-up instructions may be found here.
Thank you!
This smiling crew helped retrieve the first round of winter squash from the field. Spaghetti squash will be followed by kabocha, delicata, sweet dumpling, and several varieties of butternut.
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July 31, 2016
U-Pick Note
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By Linda Dansbury
I am sure we all feel the same sadness and disappointment when walking through the U-pick tomatoes - a very high percentage are split and rotting due to the extreme weather we have been having. This has happened in past years as well, and I have seen that people then seem to stop going into the cherry tomato beds thinking they are finished for the season. But, they aren't. More little tomatoes will ripen beautifully once the weather dries out again. Later this week is supposed to be beautiful so in another week or 2 there will be a new batch of little delicious tomatoes ready for you to enjoy.
Bouncing from one weather extreme to another is extremely challenging for the farm but at least makes for a nice photo once in a while. Gabe ponders the heavens in the earth.
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July 31, 2016
Husk Cherries New this Week
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By Linda Dansbury
We are well into the summer season and from a harvest standpoint, that means that the crops will stay pretty much the same for the next few weeks with a new or different item here and there. This week we have husk cherries, which are also known as ground cherries and cape gooseberries. They are in the same botanical genus as tomatillos, and look like minature versions of them. They have significant amounts of beta carotene, protein, calcium, fiber, vitamin C and iron. One of their names, ground cherries, is due to how they are best harvested: when they are really ripe, they fall off the plant and so all you do is pick them off of the ground. In most years, they can sit on the ground with just their protective husk for a long time waiting for one of us to pick them up - with all of this year's rain, I am not sure how long they will keep. To store them, you can just leave them in their husks and sit on the counter or table - they will keep for weeks at room temperature. Early settlers and Native Americans used these as a major portion of their diet through the winter because it is a very nutritional item that doesn't require any preservation.
The taste is somewhat tropical - I have read this description of their taste: a cherry tomato injected with mango and pineapple juice. We have a couple of recipes on this site - Ground Cherry Pie and Ground Cherry Jam. Other ways to enjoy them include using them in salsa, adding to salads with a bit of goat cheese, layer with tomatoes and basil for an easy appetizer, or in meat or fish dishes as a replacement for other recommended fruits.
When husk cherries are ripe they drop from the branches to the ground, hence the alternate name ground cherries. As Gabe demonstrates, picking these is an enjoyable and adventurous task for kids.
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July 24, 2016
Workshifts This Week of 7/24
Other News
Half of your committed work hours should be completed by the end of July! Over the course of the season full shares work 8 hours; half shares work 4 hours. If you're unable to contribute the physical portion of your share, you may contribute to the farm financially at the rate of $15/hour. This fills out the balance of your share cost.
This week we'll transplant kale, lettuce, and beets; pull weeds; cultivate; and possible harvest onions and/or watermelon. Beat the heat by coming in the morning!
Tuesday 7/26 8-10am; 10am-12noon
Wednesday 7/27 8-10am; 10am-12noon; 6-8pm
Friday 7/29 8-10am; 10am-12noon
Saturday 7/30 8-10am
A close up of an echinacea bloom, also known as purple coneflower, in the 2-acre pollinator habitat.
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July 24, 2016
Sweet Corn and Tomatillos!
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By Linda Dansbury
For the first time ever we will be receiving sweet corn as part of our share! Everyone knows how they like to cook their corn - for us, we most often boil a pot of water, add the corn, and then turn the water off. We eat our main course and then eat the corn. We eat it completely plain - no butter, not even salt! Farmers D&D eat theirs raw, uncooked, and plain. They think the flavor needs no embellishing.
A very important thing to remember is that corn loses it's sweetness quickly, especially at warm temperatures - some of the newer varieties stay sweet longer, but you need to put your share in plastic and get into your refrigerator ASAP - or better yet, eat it for dinner the evening of your pick up.
Tomatillos are an unusual veggie that may not be very well known to new members. They look like an un-ripe tomato that has a papery skin around it. To harvest them, as with many other veggies, look low on the plant. The veggie is ready when the papery husk is split and is getting loose around the veggie. In the stores, tomatillos are typically green because they are not at optimum ripeness. Look for fruit that is turning yellow - I have often found the best ones to be laying on the ground, especially as it gets later in the season.
Storing tomatillos is simple - plastic bags in the fridge - they keep for a couple of weeks so I often save 2 weeks worth and then "process" them. They also can be frozen whole after removing the papery skin.
To eat tomatillos, they can be diced up and added to salads - they have a mild flavor, reminiscent of citrus. I don't particularly love them this way so I cook and then use them. I sometimes grill them, or I halve them and roast them in the oven and then proceed with recipes for Salsa Verde, or a sauce to use with chicken and/or fish. I find myself making batches and freezing for use later in the year. My go-to recipe is the tomatillo sauce from the Chicken Stew with Tomatillo Sauce. The tomatillo sauce is great as used in the recipe but it also makes a great salsa for chips. I just searched this site and there are truly nice recipes that I had forgotten about so now I am very excited to pick tomatillos!!
Certified organic and non-gmo seed and not-quite-yet-certified-but-organic-otherwise growing practices produced a beautiful ear of sweet corn. Who would have thought it was possible?
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July 17, 2016
The heat is on!
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By Linda Dansbury
Yes, it is very hot outside right now, but my reference to it has more to do with the amount of veggies we receive this time of the year - we are close to the peak right now both for those items that are picked up at the barn and u-pick. The veggie list at this time of year doesn't change much, but the quantity is huge! So, I start working on making recipes that we can eat some and freeze some, or salads from veggies that will keep for a few days. Right now I have most of the eggplants from 2 weeks of harvest so I am planning to make some baba ganoush and try an eggplant salad - if it is as yummy as it sounds, I will share it next week.
With all the snap beans, I will make a large green bean salad, which is actually best starting on the second day. It will keep for over a week and I can have it for lunches or as a dinner side dish. I make a simple red wine vinaigrette for the salad - my "add-ins" can be some or all of the following: scallions, basil/parsley, chopped peppers, sliced celery, chick peas, feta cheese.
Speaking of snap beans, we have a couple of simple methods to get them ready for freezing. Last year at our "Now What" Seminar, a member said she had read that you don't need to blanch green beans before freezing, which has been the standard practice for many years. To do this, clean and dry them, then place on a cookie sheet and place in freezer. When frozen, place in good quality plastic bags or containers, and freeze. I have never tried this method myself, so someone who has done it and then eaten the beans later in the year, please let me know how well it works at lindadansbury@comcast.net
I also make slaw with my cabbages - again, large amounts so I can have it for a few days. To boost flavor and nutrition, in addition to using cabbage in my slaws, I slice Swiss chard or other greens thinly and add it to the mix.
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July 17, 2016
Member Share Workshop July 23rd 1-3pm
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Hosted by longtime CSA and Core Group member Gia
At the request of members, we are hosting the first follow-up to the Now What?! Workshop. All members are invited to share their successes and/or discuss what issues they are experiencing in handling their CSA Share. We might not have all the answers, but we will sure try!
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July 17, 2016
Workshifts This Week
Other News
Half of your committed work hours should be completed by the end of July! Over the course of the season full shares work 8 hours; half shares work 4 hours. If you're unable to contribute the physical portion of your share, you may contribute to the farm financially at the rate of $15/hour. This fills out the balance of your share cost.
This week we'll harvest carrots, pull weeds, and probably cultivate. Beat the heat by coming in the morning!
Tuesday 7/19 8-10am; 10am-12noon
Wednesday 7/20 8-10am; 10am-12noon; 6-8pm
Friday 7/22 8-10am; 10am-12noon
Saturday 7/23 8-10am
Baby flycatchers nestle on a beam in the Walnut Barn. A parent or two made a beautiful nest, including some orange straw bale twine.
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July 10, 2016
Fresh Garlic is here!!
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By Linda Dansbury
Fresh garlic is wonderful! The reason it is called fresh garlic is because it has just been harvested so the outer protective layers have not "hardened off" by weeks of hanging in a dry area. Use the fresh garlic exactly the way you use hardened off garlic (unlike the scapes, which do not tolerate long cooking). But...it must be refrigerated or it will spoil.
A note on cabbage - it will keep for a long time stored in plastic in the fridge but if you want to make a delicious summery slaw now, add some thinly sliced chard, scallions, garlic scapes, carrots (if you have any left) and your favorite vinaigrette.
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July 10, 2016
U-Pick request
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By Linda Dansbury
U-pick is a large portion of your CSA share, so please be sure to make time each of your pick up weeks to pick your allotment of crops. The farm is open 8am-8pm Monday through Sunday of your pick up week. A couple of comments/requests on things I have observed that need to be remembered in consideration of all of the farm members:
I noticed that several of the parsley plants in the herb garden have had all of the leaves taken off, making the plants so stripped they died. If there isn't much parsley (or other herb), please just take a couple of leaves. It will only take a short time for more to grow. Also, very shortly there will be an adequate amount in the main u-pick field.
Use the containers in the barn to accurately measure what to pick, then dump them into a plastic bag or other container. I noticed someone doing U-pick right into plastic bags, which will in all likelihood result in picking too much, because a half pint of raspberries looks like such a tiny amount in a large plastic bag.
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July 10, 2016
From Asparagus to Zucchini Cookbooks Are Here!
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For several years prior to her departure from our earthly plane, Jeannine Vannais worked hard to transform the Anchor Run herb garden into the lovely paradise that it is today. In her honor and memory we are planning to build a pergola and arbor within the herb garden for vining plants to provide shade atop a comfortable space with benches. To raise money for the materials and installation of the pergola we're having a cookbook sale. "From Asparagus to Zucchini: A Guide to Cooking Farm-Fresh Seasonal Produce" will be available to purchase for $20 from the pick up room. From each purchase, $7 will go to the cost of the pergola. For more information on the book, please follow this link. Books should be available within the next week or so; look for them in the pick up room.
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July 3, 2016
Cabbage and fennel
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By Linda Dansbury
Cabbage is one of the new items this week. Given that it is summer and cookout time, cole slaw is the obvious choice. Each family seems to have their favorite recipe - years ago, when searching for recipes for Anchor Run, I found one that has become a favorite for our family and friends - Asian Cole Slaw. Shred some of the carrots and slice some celery thinly and add to the mix. Yum! Since we are having a party today, I wish I already had my cabbage pick up. Cabbage keeps for a very long time in the fridge when stored in a plastic bag or container. But...the taste will get stronger the longer it is stored, so for the best flavor, use it up within 2 weeks.
Fennel is another new item for this week and you may not be very familiar with it. It also stores well in plastic in the fridge, although the fronds are pretty perishable. Fennel has a licorice/anise flavor, especially when eaten raw - it seems people either love that taste or not. I happen to prefer fennel cooked, which tames the strong flavor - to me it becomes delicious! There are a lot of fennel recipes on this site - both raw and cooked. Fennel mixes well with many of the other veggies we are receiving now. Try doing something like this: grill or roast fennel and zucchini slices that have been tossed in olive oil, salt and pepper. When tender, make into a pasta salad, adding sliced scallions, garlic scapes and a lot of basil leaves. Toss with olive oil and a bit of your favorite vinegar or lemon juice. Yum! To make it heartier, add a can of white beans to the mix - white beans, lentils and fennel were made for each other!
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June 26, 2016
New veggies info
Other News
By Linda Dansbury
The past couple of weeks have shown us some new veggies that you may not be very familiar with so here is a bit of info for scallions, dandelion greens and radicchio.
Scallions - everyone knows this delicious member of the allium family, which also includes onions and leeks. Store them in a plastic bag in the fridge, where they will keep for about a week. As I described a few weeks ago with the garlic scapes, scallions should not be cooked for long periods of time, because their delicate onion flavor will be lost. You may only know them to be used as a garnish or stir fried, but they are also delicious grilled - brush with olive oil prior to grilling and watch closely, turning every couple of minutes so they just get lightly charred. When making a saute like the one in this week's Member Ideas section, I would also add a scallion or 2 near the end of cooking to add the onion taste component to the dish.
Italian dandelion greens - this may be one of the most misunderstood greens we have at the farm. Dandelion is definitely bitter, but can be tamed and enjoyed by using it in some of the following ways: try the Garlic Braised Dandelion Greens with White Bean Puree that is on this site - beans have a great way of taming the bitterness of things like dandelion and broccoli raab. This recipe can be used with pretty much any cooking green we receive so even if you don't pick up the dandelion, you should try this dish - it is delicious. Another good recipe is the Dandelion Salad with Warm Hazelnut Vinaigrette. The nuts and oil also calm down the bitterness of these greens. Of course, dandelion greens can also be made into Dandelion and Pumpkin Seed Pesto - I found an interesting sounding one I will try - it uses green pumpkin seeds instead of nuts - the author says the toasty taste balances out the bitter greens and uses the pesto over pasta, as a sandwich spread or dip.
Radicchio - you probably see this in the grocery stores, and on some restaurant plates, but maybe you have never prepared it yourself? Again, it does have some bitterness. The simplest way to use it for me is to use a leaf or 2 in a mixed green salad - I then cut them into slivers and it adds a nice bite when combined with other more mild greens. I also love to grill it - cut the heads in half or quarters, depending on size, brush with olive oil and as I described with scallions, watch closely - you just want a light char. Remove from the grill, plate and drizzle with a bit more olive oil and balsamic vinegar, salt and pepper to taste - if you want, grate some parmesan cheese over and add a few toasted nuts of your choice. Or slice the grilled radicchio up and mix in with cooked pasta, adding the same things described as when served alone.
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June 19, 2016
An Abundance of Peas!
Other News
By Linda Dansbury
I hope everyone got out to the field to do the U-Pick this week - the peas are at the perfect stage and there are so many that even this quantity goes quickly.
You may be wondering what to do with them all now that you have them. They are so sweet they can be eaten raw as a snack, either alone or dipped in your favorite dip or hummus or the Garlic Scape and White Bean Dip. Or, try the Orzo with Sugar Snaps and Dill - this one uses peas, scallions and dill, and I am always happy when a recipe incorporates multiple farm offerings. This site has several recipes for peas - both salads as well as hot dishes.
Both the sugar snaps and snow peas should be cooked for only 2 minutes so they keep their crunch. They can be steamed, boiled or stir fried - all methods work well, although I prefer steaming and stir frying over boiling.
Peas can be frozen with or without blanching them. Blanch for 1 minute and then plunge in an ice water bath to stop the cooking. Drain, and then lay them out on towels to dry. Place on cookie sheets and place in freezer. Once frozen, place them in freezer bags or plastic container - don't forget to label and date them. If you skip blanching, remove the stem and string prior to freezing.
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June 12, 2016
Top of the carrots to ya!
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By Linda Dansbury
My guess is most of you throw the carrot tops into your compost pile, or leave them at the farm for the same thing. Maybe you use them as one of the items to make vegetable stock, which is a really good use for them. But, you should make Carrot Top Pesto out of the tops you will be receiving over the next couple of weeks - it is delicious and nutritious. As with the turnips and beets, remove the greens from the carrots as soon as you get them home and store in the fridge in separate bags. To use the greens remove the thick, tough stems and put into veggie stock or compost pile - the thin fronds can be made into salads or made into Carrot Top Pesto. The carrot top pesto can be used like any other pesto - on pasta, added to chicken or tuna salad, as a topping for fish or meat, drizzled onto hard boiled eggs - the list goes on. Also, keep an open mind in making the pesto itself - use the recipe as a baseline, the nuts, cheese type, herbs and citrus can all be changed to what you like and have on hand. I have added the recipe for this week.
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June 12, 2016
Now What?! Workshop Recap
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By Gia
The Now What?! Workshop was attended by about 20 members! It was a great exchange of ideas and information. Judith, another Core Group member, was also present and helped to field questions (Thanks Judith!). We spoke about how to keep the produce fresh (Greens Bags, Rubbermaid FreshWorks and Produce Saver containers), separating the greens from the bulbs and storing them separately. We talked about different tools which make the veggie prep work easier. We feasted on a variety of Pistou (I usually make my Pesto without the nuts) – Garlic Scape Pistou, Kale Pistou Lite and Mizuna Pistou were all tried. Members also tasted ARF Week 3/4 Quiche (see the recipe below).
This year we spent some time talking about using a solar oven to cook. My (flat) Mango Banana Bread- baked on Friday in my solar oven – was enjoyed.
Food Dehydrators were also discussed, and Zucchini Chips (from last year’s bounty) were shared. Tomatoes and Zucchini were the stars of this discussion.
The Now What?! Workshop was so successful that I was asked if we would do something on a more regular basis! We will be planning workshops with more of a Member Idea Exchange theme. We will also be having a Member Share Fermenting Workshop. Stay tuned for more info on both of these! This workshop was the perfect example of the C in CSA – Community. Thank you to everyone who attended!
ARF Week 3/4 Quiche
Beet Greens, Kohlrabi Greens
• Chopped
• Steamed (about 5 to 15 minutes)
• Squeeze out liquid when cool
Mizuna – about 1 bunch
• Chopped,
• Sautéed
Kohlrabi Bulbs - about 3 medium bulbs
• Shredded or pureed
• Mix with 1 tsp salt
• Squeeze out moisture
Dehydrated tomatoes – 1 to 2 handfuls
Cilantro – ½ to 1 handful chopped
½ to 1 cup Shredded Mexican blend cheese
2/3 to 1 cup whole wheat flour
8 to 10 eggs
2/3 to 1 cup milk
1. Combine ingredients.
2. Pour into 8x8 greased casserole pan
3. Bake at 400 degrees for 30 – 45 minutes
Experiment with the greens you use! Experiment with the type of cheese!
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June 12, 2016
New Crops
Other News
By Linda Dansbury
Last week brought us a new item that is a farm treasure - garlic scapes which is the flower stalk and bud from the garlic plant. If left on the plant, it will take most of the energy from the plant so the bulbs won't form. By harvesting the scapes, we essentially have an extra crop. Scapes keep in the fridge for at least when stored in a plastic bag. They can be chopped up and frozen, or made into Garlic Scape Pesto or Garlic Scape and White Bean Dip and eaten immediately or frozen. It is best eaten uncooked, but if you want to cook it, add it at the end of the cooking process because long term cooking diminishes the flavor of an already mild garlic flavor.
This week brings us the first of the summer squash. Anchor Run grows a lot of varieties of summer squash - they come in many different shapes, colors and sizes. If you only choose those you are familiar with, you are missing out. They are all interchangeable in recipes, but with simple preparation, such as grilling (my favorite), you can pick up subtle differences in flavor. With Father's Day coming up next Sunday, many of us will be grilling. Depending on the shape and size of the squash, cut it in a way that will give you slices that are about a half to 3/4 of an inch thick. Brush with olive oil and season with salt and pepper. Grill, and watch carefully so they don't burn. Turn a few times so each side cooks equally. This delicious veggie goes well with anything, from a part of an appetizer platter to a veggie side dish with a grilled protein. We also have many recipes on this site. Enjoy the harvest!!
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June 5, 2016
Beets are here
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By Linda Dansbury
Over the many years I have been writing for the farm, the public's knowledge and taste for various vegetables have truly evolved. In the beginning, most people really didn't know what to do with things like kale and chard. Now with juicing and smoothies being so popular, even if those greens are too much to prepare and eat as part of a meal, I often hear members say "Oh I will juice these greens". Or "My kids love smoothies with kale".
The same thing has happened with beets - most folks used to say that they didn't like beets, but now they are happy and excited when beets appear. I particularly like them early in the season when they are small and sweet. Beets are so nutritious and so much can be done with them. As with turnips, separate the greens from the beets and store separately. The greens can be used with other greens in stir fries and saute's and there are a couple of recipes on this site that incorporate both together, such as Roasted Beet and Beet Green Risotto and Roasted Beets and Beet Greens. If we receive beets without their greens, Swiss chard is a great substitution, because they are in the same family. Again, search this site for great ideas and recipes.
Beets keep a long time stored in the fridge or pickled, but again, at this time of year I actually like to use them quickly because they are sweeter. We love them roasted, sliced and mixed with greens in a beautiful salad with a Dijon mustard and tarragon dressing. Yummy!
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June 5, 2016
Salad Days
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By Linda Dansbury
You may be wondering what to do with the vast quantity of lettuces you are receiving with your share right now. If you typically use the same salad dressing recipe every time you prepare a salad, you might get bored of the repetitiveness. Check out this website for a multitude of dressings and variations on vinaigrettes that will keep your tastebuds happy. There is a basic vinaigrette with a number of variations, balsamic vinaigrette, lemon-chive and it goes on and on. Just go to the website, click on "Members Page". Then select the tab that says "Search". In the pull down bar select "Recipes" and type in "dressing" or "salad" and you will see the listing.
I almost think of lettuces as the main vegetable in a meal and try to match the dressing with what we are having for dinner. For example, if we are having a meal that is comprised of Asian flavors, then my salad dressing will have sesame oil and/or tamari/soy sauce in it. With the start of peas, I will add peas either raw or flash boiled for 1-2 minutes. With a steak, I might make a Caesar salad. Experiment with different greens, veggies and combinations of flavors - fresh herbs add great pops of flavor to salad dressings. If you have a favorite way to prepare your salad greens, please email me at lindadansbury@comcast.net so I can share it with the rest of the members.
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May 29, 2016
Give me Peas...and Strawberries!
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By Linda Dansbury
Peas and strawberries give us the first opportunity to go out to the field for U-Pick. Here are some tips to make the time in the field enjoyable:
  • Wear comfortable clothes, shoes/boots and sunscreen - it can be very hot, cool, rainy on any given day
  • Most crops mature starting at the bottom of the plant so for things like peas, green beans, cherry tomatoes and edamame look for mature veggies lower to the ground, especially when we start picking
  • Be gentle when picking, holding onto the stem with one hand and the veggie/fruit with the other and gently pull the veggie/fruit off
  • The crops sometimes fall into the aisles - please walk around - don't trample the plants
  • Pick only what is listed on the U-pick board and only during your pick up week
  • Please teach your children the same guidelines, keeping them in the aisles between the rows and showing them how to gently pick the crop
By following these simple guidelines you and those coming to pick after you will have a fun, rewarding experience.
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May 29, 2016
Kohlrabi and Lettuce
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By Linda Dansbury
Due to vacation, I am writing this 2 weeks ahead of this week's harvest distribution. Derek and Dana did their weekly field walk and took a very educated guess on what would be available the week of May 30th. Early in the season this is difficult because early crops are very dependent on sun and warmth to reach maturity - elements which have not been reliable at all this spring.
Kohlrabi is one of the new veggies likely to be seen which kind of resembles a spaceship. It is in the same family as radishes and the delicious white turnips you have been seeing in the pick up room so the taste profile is similar. Kohlrabi keeps for a long time in the fridge, but the longer it stays, the stronger the flavor becomes. Kohlrabi is normally peeled prior to eating, but I have seen Derek noshing on kohlrabi, skin and all! I like it raw with or without a sprinkle of salt - I eat it often with lunch or as a snack while preparing dinner. It is great as part of a crudite platter and delicious as a component of slaw - julienne it along with some of the greens, such as kale and chard and make your favorite cole slaw dressing - one of mine happens to be Asian Style Cole Slaw. There are many recipes on this site for kohlrabi in cooked versions, but this time of year, for me, the mild taste is best when eaten raw.
Lettuces are now making their full appearance and I will feature them in the future but a couple of notes now - the lettuces grown on the farm have so much more flavor than store purchased lettuce - nuances that you don't want to cover up with thick, store purchased dressings. Making your own is really simple. Take a jar with a tight-fitting lid (or a small bowl and whisk). All you absolutely need is a ratio of 1/4 of you favorite vinegar to 3/4 part olive oil, salt and fresh ground pepper to taste - a bit of added Dijon mustard helps emulsify. Shake or whisk until emulsified and lightly dress the greens. Yum!
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May 22, 2016
More on Greens - tops, stems and other trimmings
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By Linda Dansbury
Turnips and radishes are delicious - you may not realize that the tops of both of these are not only edible, they are delicious, so don't throw them away. They can be added to soups, stews or sauteed like you do broccoli raab - heat a large saute pan, add garlic and red pepper flakes and cook for a minute - don't let the garlic burn. Add a large pile of chopped mixed greens and keep moving around in the pan. They can be eaten as is, or to bulk it up and make a meal out of it add a can of white beans (or other cooked protein) and serve with pasta or rice. Top with grated cheese if desired.
Stems from kale, chard, onion roots, stems from herbs, etc can be used as a veggie stock base. Place them in a freezer bag in the freezer and keep adding your trimmings until you have enough to make stock - check out the Vegetable Stock recipe on this site for a larger list of what to keep.
For greens that you just can't use in a short period of time, here is an easy way to save them, which I learned from a fellow member. Bring a large pot of water to a boil. While you are waiting for it to boil, prepare the greens you want to save by removing stems and rough chopping any large leaves. Place the greens in a large colander and place in the sink. When the water comes to a full boil, slowly pour over the greens. Let the greens cool enough to handle, then squeeze out as much water as you can, keeping the greens in a fist-sized ball. Place the ball(s) in a freezer storage bag in the freezer. Later, when making soups, stews or saute's, just remove the amount you want.
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May 22, 2016
Green, greens, and more greens!
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By Linda Dansbury
The first few harvests are always predominantly greens - they take much less time to mature and tolerate and actually prefer cooler temperatures than vegetables such as eggplant, peppers and tomatoes. If you didn't read last week's newsletter and this is your first pick up week, go back and read it for tips on how to store and enjoy the pea shoots. Use this site as a resource for ideas and recipes. When you pull up this website, click on Member's Page. Across the top there will be several tabs. Click on Search. A pull down bar will be there - click on it and select Recipes. Type in the veggie you want and hit return and a list of recipes will appear. We hope this helps.
Greens that come from the farm this time of year are delicate and delicious. Below is a summary of what can be done with some of the greens we are receiving so far. When making salads, mix the greens together for wonderful taste combinations.
Arugula - will keep for about of week in the fridge. Delicious in salads, either on its own simply dressed with good quality olive oil, a squeeze of lemon juice, salt and pepper. Arugula is also considered an herb in the culinary world. Its peppery taste is great to pep up things such as pasta salad - just chop up the arugula and add to the pasta salad. If you want to use it in a hot dish, it is best just wilted such as when making pasta. Right after draining the pasta, add chopped arugula and let it wilt into the hot pasta. Finally, it makes amazing pesto - recipe on this site!
Kale - will keep for up to 2 weeks stored in a plastic bag in the fridge. A lot of people juice and smoothie their kale (and other greens), but if that's all you do with it you are missing out. Kale makes wonderful salads, especially Caesar. Remove the tough stems, stack the leaves, roll them up and slice thin. When you have the kale all sliced, place in a bowl and message the leaves - they will turn soft and almost satin-like in texture. Then dress with your favorite dressing - I used to make Caesar dressing, but found a bottled one that is delicious and healthy - it is OPA Caesar and is found with other brands of refrigerated dressings. Kale can be cooked in countless recipes - search this site for them. Baby kale can be simply wilted in stir fries, soups, stews or even added to salads and eaten raw.
Chard - will store for up to 2 weeks in a plastic bag in fridge. When the stems are removed the leaves can be used in virtually any cooked recipe that calls for spinach. On this site there are recipes that include chard and other greens for pasta with greens, soups, salads and more. Check them out to try them or inspire you.
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May 15, 2016
A new season and new crop
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By Linda Dansbury
It is of course the first harvest of everything this week, but even after all these years of being an Anchor Run member, I still am still often surprised by what our farmers provide for us. This year it is pea shoots! You may be wondering what you can do with pea shoots, or why even bother with them?
Pea shoots are very nutritious, containing high amounts of vitamin C and antioxidants. Store them in a plastic bag in the crisper drawer of your fridge and they are best used within a few days since they are fairly fragile. They can be eaten raw as a garnish for vegetables or a final topping on stir fries. They are also delicious as a component in mixed green salads. They can also be quickly cooked in a stir fry - they should be added last because they are delicate. Here is a very simple method for stir frying the pea shoots - I prefer not to use additional seasonings such as soy sauce or oyster sauce because I like the taste of the pea shoots.
Smash 2 garlic cloves and peel and cut into julienne about 1/2 inch of ginger. 1/4 teaspoon or so of red pepper flakes are optional. Tear the peas shoots into pieces about 2" long. In a non-stick fry pan or wok, heat about a tablespoon of canola or peanut oil. Add the garlic, ginger and red pepper flakes if using and keep it moving and frying for 1-2 minutes. Add the pea shoots and stir fry until leaves are barely wilted - only 1 minute. That's it! A tasty and beautiful side dish on the table in about 5 minutes. Enjoy.
For the other items that everyone is receiving this week, please use the website for recipes. Here are a few that I particularly like: Spinach Salad with warm Bacon Dressing - you can use both the spinach and the chard for this recipe. The arugula can be added to many cooked dishes, such as soups and stews. It can be made into Arugula Pesto. I love it as its own salad - it is delicious with sliced mushrooms and a simple squeeze of fresh lemon and drizzle of good olive oil and salt and pepper to taste. One mention on the turnips and radishes - when you get them home, separate the leaves from the roots and store in separate plastic bag - don't throw them away! They are delicious sauteed along with the turnips or on their own. In this day and age, you probably have your own favorite recipes for kale and other items, so please email at lindadansbury@comcast.net. It really helps us be a community of sharing ideas on enjoying the harvest!
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December 20, 2015
Another Season Extension
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By Derek McGeehan
Due to the mild fall and winter we still have an abundance of crops to harvest fresh on the farm including several varieties of kale, arugula, greens mix, collards, napa and regular cabbage, tatsoi, bok choy, rutabaga, radishes, and turnips as well as storage crops like potatoes, garlic, celeriac, beets, turnips, radishes, rutabaga, and kohlrabi. We're also excited about cut-and-come-again greens like spinach, mix, raab, arugula, and kale. Nothing improves the sweet flavor of vegetables like the cold of fall and winter!
We are planning to offer CSA shares on a weekly basis throughout the rest of the winter until we run out of produce or temperatures drop low enough to actually end the growing season. Shares will cost $30 per week and need to be paid for when you pick up your produce (cash or check payable to Anchor Run CSA only). On the weekend prior to each pick up we will e-mail you what is in the expected harvest and you will have to respond by 12am midnight Monday if you want a share that week.
This will give us great experience with growing and distributing produce throughout the winter months (and into spring?) and move us closer to fulfilling our dream of a year round CSA. The pick up day will be Wednesdays 1-8pm and the first share will be January 6th. Shares will include fresh greens and roots and storage roots and tubers and should include around 10 items or 10 pounds of produce. Your comments or suggestions are welcome.
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December 13, 2015
Fall ideas for Hakurei Turnips and Kohlrabi
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By Linda Dansbury
It seems that most of the time I focus newsletters on methods that will not heat up the kitchen - with this weather I guess I should be doing the same thing!
However, my cooking methods shift in the fall/winter so when Derek sent me this week's harvest I thought about the kohlrabi and hakurei turnips and how I will use them. Both can be eaten raw as a snack or sliced thin and added to salads - which is something I know I have discussed in the past. Here are a couple of things you might not know:
Kohlrabi - they are delicious roasted! I have most often combined them with other fall veggies when roasting, but they are great roasted by themselves. Cut into slices about 1/4" thick and then cut into half moons. Toss in olive oil, sliced garlic, salt and pepper and spread in a single layer on a cookie sheet. Roast in a 450 degree oven for 15-20 min turning occasionally to brown evenly. Remove from oven and sprinkle with grated parmesan cheese. Place back in oven for about 5 minutes or until cheese is melted and slightly browned. Very yummy!!
Hakurei Turnips - if your family likes glazed carrots, this method is likely to be a success! If turnips have tops, remove and reserve. Place turnips into a saute pan and place water halfway up the sides of the turnips. Add about 1 Tablespoon each of butter and sugar and a good pinch of salt. Bring to a boil and simmer, stirring occasionally until tender and liquid is getting syrupy. If turnips are tender before liquid is syrupy, remove turnips to a serving plate and cook liquid down a bit. When to a nice consistency, add the turnip greens (or other if no turnip tops - such as escarole or endive) and cook until just wilted. Add the greens to the plate and serve.
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November 15, 2015
Welcome to the Winter CSA
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By Linda Dansbury
This year we have decided to expand the newsletter during the Winter CSA. We find ourselves cooking differently starting at this time of the year for a couple of reasons: it is colder and darker, so the body craves richer, stronger flavors; and, we cook differently for and with family and friends for the holidays.
I will have a column or 2 when there are new items and when I cook something that is different - especially if it is fitting to serve as part of a holiday meal. Although we won't formally have Members Ideas and Suggestions for this 6 week CSA, if you have a recipe that is special in your family for the holidays and incorporates the bounty of Anchor Run, please send it to me at lindadansbury@comcast.net.
We are not receiving a new veggie this week, but I do want to mention the kale we received last week, because it is more tender, almost delicate, so it needs to be treated differently than the kale we receive the rest of the year. It is excellent in stir fries - try it in the Easy Korean Beef recipe that is on this site. Delicious and fast and easy!
I assisted in a winter squash demo at the Wrightstown Farmers Market yesterday and made a recipe that was easy, but delicious - a lot of people that tried it plan on making it. Not only is it delicious - it is also really beautiful! It is called Honey Glazed Roasted Squash. If you still have your delicata squash, the skin doesn't have to be peeled and it looks especially beautiful. Enjoy
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