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News and Notes
from the Field

Posts Filtered by Month - August 2017 |
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August 27, 2017
And the Potatoes Are...Harvested
Notes From The Field
By Derek McGeehan
The above photo was actually taken a month or so ago when we were checking to see if the potatoes were ready to be harvested. In reality the kids didn't help harvest any potatoes this year, but about 60 CSA members and farm staff did, and we all are very thankful for the team effort.
A quick note on how to thoroughly enjoy the potatoes: cut in french fry shape, coat cookie sheet with olive oil, put potato slices on sheet single layer thick, drizzle a bit more olive oil on there, mix around with hands, sprinkle on salt, bake at 375 for an hour, and voila, the best homemade french fries ever (I promise)!
Some fun Anchor Run Farm potato facts:
- 8 varieties of potatoes were grown (Dark Red Norland, Satina, Nicola, Purple Viking, Harvest Moon, Elba, Strawberry Paw, and Butte). Two are early varieties, 3 are mid-season varieties, and 3 are late-season.
- 1750 pounds of potatoes were planted. 1500 pounds were purchased as official organic seed potato and 250 pounds were planted from our own stash.
- 6500 pounds of potatoes were harvested. The yield was just so-so this year, nothing epic. For us, an epic yield would be about 6 times the weight planted. The yield was much better in the part of the field that has been under our management longer, perhaps because of annual application of soil amendments. Blue potatoes yielded the worst while buff/yellow ones yielded the best (or perhaps are easier to see in soil).
- About 10,000 feet of raised beds were planted with a potato every foot on April 19th. The beds were cultivated in late-May and hilled in mid-June. Hilling the raised beds involves pulling an implement with that tractor that uses two sets of discs to pull the soil up onto the plants which gives the potatoes more room to grow.
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August 27, 2017
Kale Returns, Watermelon Continues
Expected Harvest
By Derek McGeehan
Harvest #16 (Week B) should include scallions, onions, sweet peppers, potatoes, carrots, kale, Swiss chard, Italian dandelion, lettuce, eggplant, tomatoes, watermelon, garlic, hot peppers, shishito peppers, okra, parsley, and cilantro. Some items will be a choice and may not be available during all pick up times. U-pick should include cherry tomatoes, husk cherries, tomatillos, edamame, yellow wax beans, flowers, and herbs.
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August 27, 2017
Workshifts Scheduled for Week of 8/27/17
Other News
By Derek McGeehan
Direct seeded watermelon radish, purple daikon, white daikon, and hakurei turnips just coming up as a farm gnome and a farm dog look on.
We're past the halfway point of the season for work hour opportunities. Workshifts will be scheduled through October but frequency will diminish in September. If you still need to work your pledged hours please consider signing up for a workshift soon. If you'd rather contribute financially to cover the work hour cost of your share please do so soon so that we can plan accordingly. E-mail us at anchorruncsa@gmail.com if you have any questions.
Workshifts this week:
Wednesday 8/30 9-11am
Wednesday 8/30 5:30-7:30pm
Friday 9/1 9-11am
Sunday 9/3 7-9am
Workshift sign-up instructions may be found here.
Thank you!
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August 27, 2017
Ode to the Farm
Other News
by Gia Yaccarino
The farm is my safe place. Recently, due to weather and my schedule, I had to do my U-Pick on Wednesday. That week had been a bit taxing and I recall the thought, on my way to the farm, repeating in my mind, “Just get to the farm. Just get to the farm.” When my mind is racing, once I arrive at the farm, things slow down. My cell phone is only used to take a picture of the U-pick board and maybe some photos of the beautiful crops in the fields. Otherwise, I’m disconnected from the “demands” of my daily life. Sometimes, I do my U-Pick in solitude and it becomes a deeply meditative time. It’s nothing I’ve planned – it just happens as I pick my share and I am so focused on the plants, the soil, the bugs! Other times, I see my “Farm Friends” – sometimes familiar faces and sometimes new ones! We chat about our lives, the crops, what we will do with our share. I swear I learn something new each time, whether it’s a meditative day or a chatting day or a bit of both. And before I know it – I’m done with my U-pick for the week. Can time fly and slow down at the same time?
Recently, I have been reflecting on how I am at the farm - smiling, happy, relaxed, open to different ideas and discussions. I’ve decided that I need to let that person live outside the farm also. I need to try to regain my “farm calm” when life is getting me stressed. I probably won’t go so far as to strike up a conversation with strangers at Acme (Security: Weird lady in aisle 3!) or be waving and smiling to other cars as I leave the Acme parking lot, but don’t you think we would all benefit if we shared a little more of our “farm selves” with the rest of the world? Just a thought.
- Gia
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August 27, 2017
New Crops: Cured Garlic and Okra
Other News
By Linda Dansbury
Garlic - we have now transitioned to cured garlic, so there is no longer the need to keep it in the fridge. Store in a cool, dry area and it should keep for quite some time.
Okra - this may be something you are only familiar with in Gumbo - a staple in the deep south. Okra actually translates to the word Gumbo! It is very perishable and won't keep for more than a week in the fridge. There is a light version of gumbo on this site called Louisiana Shrimp Gumbo that is delicious. There are several other recipes as well - a couple of my favorites are Easy Indian-style Stewed Okra and Okra with Corn and Tomatoes. Fried okra is also delicious - the method can easily be found on the internet. Just don't shy away from this strange looking veggie!
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August 27, 2017
Yet Another U Pick Note
Other News
By Linda Dansbury
Don't waste this beautiful weather! Go outside and do your U Pick! Many probably think "I'll get back next time" - but with this cooler weather, opportunities for high quality U Pick veggies will decrease.
Again, the edamame are amazing this year, but a few plants are beginning to show signs of being past their prime so don't miss out! Again, I was able to get my allotment from just a few plants so it didn't take long at all.
The blackberries may be finished for the season. This year's harvest was an unanticipated bonus. The plants have only been in the ground since last April (2016). All of the berries this year were produced on canes that grew last season, their first in the ground. All of the big canes that stand 6 feet tall in the air on the trellising system will fruit next season which should mean greater yields and an easier time picking. Oh the anticipation!
Some of the flowers are starting to wane. Probably only 1 or 2 weeks of sunflowers are left, and with these cool nights the zinnias will also be trending downward - this has been the best flower year at the farm and I am so happy with the vases of color in my home.
The cherry tomatoes, although sparse now, still have a lot of little tomatoes on them. Don't give up - with the nice weather we are having, the tomatoes on the vines will be ripening without cracking.
Husk cherries and tomatillos will linger for another couple of weeks, but like all summertime produce, cooler temperatures and lessening daylight mean a decline in yields.
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August 27, 2017
It can't get more delicious!
How I Enjoyed My Harvest
By Linda Dansbury
The amazing food goes so well with the gorgeous weather we are having. I made a few delicious dishes this week that I would like to share with you. Please send how you are enjoying your harvest to lindadansbury@comcast.net and put Anchor Run in the subject line.
Husk cherries, cherry tomatoes, scallions, chilies, garlic, sweet peppers, cilantro - I finally made the Fresh Husk Cherry Salsa that Julianne sent to me. It is a bit time consuming because of husking and chopping the husk cherries and all the other veggies, but it was well worth it - this salsa is delicious. We ate half of it with tortilla chips and used the rest as a topping on fish. Yum!
Watermelon, tomato, scallions, chilies, mint, Thai basil - prepared the Watermelon and Tomato Salad from this site - I made a large batch for a potluck dinner I went to and it was a huge hit. As a note, others brought salads using tomatoes and other fresh, local veggies, but this one was far more flavorful and delicious than any of the others.
Edamame - I haven't prepared anything yet, but did cook up the first batch and have been happily snacking on them. The next batch will likely get cooked and placed in freezer for future use.
Tomatoes, lettuce, scallions, garlic, herbs - I have been making salads that are about half lettuce and half tomatoes - don't think that just because we aren't getting a lot of lettuce right now that you can't have salads. Search this site to get some ideas.
Carrots, scallions, dill - made the Lemony Carrot Salad with Dill from this site. It was a refreshing change from the other dishes we have been eating.
Sweet peppers, chili pepper, onions, garlic, tomato, Swiss chard/dandelion greens, herbs - made a frittata for dinner one night and had leftovers for a couple of lunches. One of the easiest dinners! Add or subtract what your family likes and add cheese if you desire. Dice and saute the veggies until fairly tender, adding the greens at the end. Meanwhile, preheat oven to about 400 degrees. Whisk 8-12 eggs and add milk, 1/2 n 1/2, or cream and whisk again. Add salt and pepper to taste. When veggies are ready, pour the egg mixture in and stir to evenly distribute the veggies in the egg mixture. Then, stop mixing. Let the eggs set on the bottom and then slide into the oven to allow the rest of the eggs to set up - at the end you can turn on the broiler to get the top nicely browned. Remove from oven and top with fresh chopped herbs and/or grated cheese.
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August 20, 2017
Through the Fields We Go
Notes From The Field
By Derek McGeehan
Meandering through a buckwheat field towing a wagon then playing hide-and-seek during sunset with the kids - what's better?
This could be my favorite time of year. The workload changes into more harvesting, clean up, and sowing of cover crops, which are all steps taken towards getting the farm ready for the 'off' season. Parts of the farm get put to sleep for six months or more. The end is in sight. The reward for many months of very hard work and long days under the sun and in the rain is the harvest and distribution of great produce. We slowly regain control (to our eyes and minds) by mowing 4-foot tall amaranth and lambs quarter that laugh at us because they dropped 10,000 seeds, offspring we'll battle with next year. Now, though, it's mowed, chiseled, and replaced by our intentional communities of buckwheat, daikon radish, oats, and clover. Instead of having to actively manage, say, 10 acres of actively growing produce, it's reduced to 5 acres. Our perspective, our focus, narrows. We can sit back, walk around the farm, admire more of its beauty that we participate in sculpting. We feel thankful for the enhanced biodiversity that our diversified farm allows for. This and that said, throw in a tropical storm and a hurricane, dump 24 inches of rain on us in my favorite two months like way back in 2011, and I might feel differently. For now, though, I feel lucky, thankful, fortunate. I hope you are able to enjoy the farm when you pick up and pick your produce.
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August 20, 2017
Produce for the Eclipse and Beyond
Expected Harvest
By Derek McGeehan
Harvest #15 (Week A) should include scallions, onions, carrots, sweet peppers, potatoes, watermelon, eggplant, tomatoes, lettuce, garlic, cilantro, parsley, Italian dandelion, Swiss chard, okra, hot peppers, and shishito peppers. Some items will be a choice and may not be available during all pick up times. U-pick should include cherry tomatoes, husk cherries, blackberries, edamame, green beans, flowers, and herbs. Tomatillos are being given a break to mature.
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August 20, 2017
So much great food to eat!
How I Enjoyed My Harvest
By Linda Dansbury
"Best of Show" and 1st Place at the 2017 Middletown Grange Fair!
Last Sunday I wrote what I planned to do with my veggies - you know how that sometimes goes, but in this case I did get a lot accomplished!
Eggplant, parsley, garlic - I made Baba Ganoush. There is a real good version on this site, but I now make the one that is in the Zahav cookbook. Light the grill and when hot cut the eggplant(s) in half long way. Drizzle with olive oil. Place egplant on grill cut side up and roast until the skin is black and crinkly and the flesh is very soft and pudding-like. When cool enough to handle, dig the flesh out and place in a bowl. Mash up the eggplant, add a couple minced cloves of garlic and olive oil and vigorously stir till smooth. Add tahini, salt, lemon juice and parsley and stir again, adding cold water to get to the desired thickness.
Peppers, garlic, summer squash - I roasted all the peppers and summer squash I had on the grill; some of the peppers I roasted till the skins were black, removed from grill, peeled the skins off, removed seeds and cut up. Placed in a small bowl with salt, pepper, a bit of garlic, drizzle of olive oil and a small splash of balsamic vinegar. These can now be add to sandwiches, eaten on bread or crackers, eaten alone - whatever your imagination comes up with. The squash I had as a side dish for a couple dinners.
Tomatillos, garlic - made the Tomatillo Sauce from the Stewed Chicken with Tomatillo Sauce recipe. I used 3 weeks worth of tomatillo's and I froze the large batch in increments the recipe calls for.
Tomato, garlic - we ate delicious tomatoes all week: bruschetta, caprese salad and also made tomato sauce for homemade pizza - it is so easy. Use a fairly firm tomato - the field ones are best so there isn't so much liquid. Slice the stem end of the tomato off - don't waste it! I eat around the stem. Using a box grater, put the palm of your hand on the tomato placing the cut side of the tomato on the grater. Flatten your hand and run the tomato over the grate - you will end up with just skin in your hand - really neat method I just learned this year. Add a bit of minced garlic, a tiny bit of salt and a slight drizzle of olive oil. This can now be used in any way you would use any tomato sauce.
This week I plan to made caponata and will add the Swiss chard and dandelion greens from these last couple weeks to it.
If you have an idea for how to enjoy the harvest, please send to me at lindadansbury@comcast.net and put Anchor Run in subject line.
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August 20, 2017
Even more about U Pick
Other News
By Linda Dansbury
Fall brassicas loving the rain and cool nights, thriving, with intentionally grown mowed weeds in the aisles for erosion control. And that's a nice sunset with a wagon towed.
Typically around this time of year, many members stop doing their U Pick - free time is reduced due to back to school commitments or other things. Remember that U pick is a large part of your share and from now through September when U Pick will end except for some herbs is as pleasant a time as any to be out in the field. The heat and humidity drop, the cherry tomatoes make a comeback because of lower humidity and less rain (typically), and green beans and edamame are perfect for picking. And, I always feel my house is more welcoming for both family and guests when flower vases are filled.
Edamame this year are as nice as they have been in a few years. Ample rainfall allowed for an abundance of well-filled pods, many with 3 beans. Don't miss out! I picked my allotment from only about 4 plants so it didn't take long.
Are you wondering about the blackberries only being on the lower branches, instead of up higher where they would be easier to find and pick? Blackberries bear fruit on second year branches, or canes. So those beautiful branches that are trellised now are where the berries will be next year. In the meantime, take a little time and push the grass away to find some of the largest, juiciest berries!
Enjoy!
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August 20, 2017
Do you need garden or yard help?
Other News
By Field Manager Hannah
Need help preparing your yard or garden for winter? Field Manager, Hannah, and Assistant Farmer, Pat, would like to bring their gardening skills to your home!
As fall approaches, work on the farm becomes less overwhelming, making us available to assist you with projects such as:
Plantings and Garden Implementation
Hardscaping
Fall clean up
Mulching
Mowing
Weeding
Leaf removal
Using our knowledge of sustainable plant care from Anchor Run, all of our work will have the health of your family and the environment in mind.
Contact Hannah at barefootfarmersgardening@gmail.com to arrange a free consultation!
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August 20, 2017
Tick Avoidance and Prevention
Other News
By Evelyn Throne
Ideas on avoiding ticks:
Here are a few user-friendly, safe, and effective tick-borne disease prevention tips:
1) Use Sawyer Insect Repellant with 20% Picaridin or Repel w/Lemon Eucalyptus on your skin. These are safe for children and actually smell good.
2) Ticks start low and crawl up, a great prevention tip is to spray your shoes ahead of time with Sawyer 0.5% Permethrin spray available at Dicks Sporting Goods.
3) Pre-treated clothing can be bought through Insect Shield or www.BugBeWear.com or at a local sporting goods store. I heartily recommend purchasing insect repellant socks.
4) Using a lint roller will do a good job removing ticks on your skin and putting your clothing in the dryer for 15 minutes will dry out and kill any ticks on them.
5) For more great information go to: www.tickencounter.org or www.palyme.org
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August 20, 2017
Workshifts Scheduled for Week of 8/20/17
Other News
By Derek McGeehan
A favorite pastime of many a kid at the farm, strawbale hoppin' is best during a nice sunset.
We're past the halfway point of the season for work hour opportunities. Workshifts will be scheduled through October but frequency will diminish in September. If you still need to work your pledged hours please consider signing up for a workshift soon. If you'd rather contribute financially to cover the work hour cost of your share please do so soon so that we can plan accordingly. E-mail us at anchorruncsa@gmail.com if you have any questions.
Workshifts this week:
Tuesday 8/22 9-11am
Wednesday 8/23 9-11am
Wednesday 8/23 6-8pm
Friday 8/25 9-11am
Sunday 8/27 7-9am
Workshift sign-up instructions may be found here.
Thank you!
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August 13, 2017
Planting and Harvesting
Notes From The Field
By Derek McGeehan
From our perspective as farmers it's been a good year of harvests so far, and hopefully you our members feel the same way. Chalk it up to the pretty decent overall weather we've had, plus soils that are really showing the responsiveness to years of tender loving care with additions of organic matter through cover cropping and compost, mineral amendments, appropriate diverse fertilizer applications, fallow periods, reduced and adjusted tillage techniques, timely cultivation and weed management, and just plain old accumulated experience and better decision making. Trust us, it takes time to really understand and work with the farm-as-ecosystem but we've put in our time here. However, much is weather derived of course, and this year (so far) we're reaping the benefit of a reasonably kind weather pattern, or we've just been plain lucky that some of the torrential rains have missed us. The farm also benefits from many hard workers, our staff, our work-traders, and our CSA members. Thank you for your continued support and trust!
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August 13, 2017
Thankful for the Bounty
Expected Harvest
By Derek McGeehan
Harvest #14 (Week B) should include watermelon, tomatoes, sweet peppers, hot peppers, shishito peppers, carrots, onions, scallions, Italian dandelion, parsley, Swiss chard, cilantro, dill, lettuce, eggplant, cantaloupe, and okra. Some items will be a choice and may not be available during all pick up times. U-pick should include cherry tomatoes, green beans, edamame, tomatillos, husk cherries, blackberries, flowers, and herbs.
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August 13, 2017
Hooray for Edamame!
Other News
By Linda Dansbury
Edamame is one of the highly anticipated crops at the farm. Edamame, another name for fresh soybeans are fun, delicious and nutritious. I have been watching the pods fill out and they are beautiful this year - Derek says it is due to the regular rains (irregular for July!) that are making the plants so robust. As with several other crops we pick, the beans at the bottom will be the most filled out and ready.
To enjoy, they should be cooked - bring a large pot of water to a boil and generously salt the water. Add edamame and cook at a gentle boil for about 8-10 minutes - start checking for doneness after 7 minutes. The size of the beans will make a difference in how long they take to cook, so it could be as much as 12 minutes this year. Be care that the water doesn't boil over - it tends to foam up quite a bit.
Once cooked, you can eat as a snack by "sucking" the beans out of the pod, or you can squeeze the beans out and use in recipes that call for edamame or lima beans. They also freeze well. Dry them the best that you can, lay them on a cookie sheet and freeze. When frozen, place in a plastic bag or container and store until use. There are many recipes on this site for edamame, including Edamame Hummus. I know that my first picking will be gobbled up as snacks.
Blackberries are a wonderful treat from the farm. Just a quick note on picking. For the best tasting berries, pick only those that are completely black - no red blush left - the sweetest ones are those that come off the plant easily when given a slight tug. Be gentle - they are very perishable!
Potatoes will be distributed very soon. The "Dark Red Norland" variety we will start receiving either this week or next does not need to be refrigerated, but it is not a storage potato, so enjoy them within about 3 - 4 weeks for best taste.
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August 13, 2017
Workshifts Scheduled for Week of 8/13/17
Other News
By Derek McGeehan
This crew helped us harvest the very first round of 2017 potatoes on Friday!
We're past the halfway point of the season for work hour opportunities. Workshifts will be scheduled through October but frequency will diminish in September. If you still need to work your pledged hours please consider signing up for a workshift soon. If you'd rather contribute financially to cover the work hour cost of your share please do so soon so that we can plan accordingly. E-mail us at anchorruncsa@gmail.com if you have any questions.
Workshifts this week:
Tuesday 8/15 9-11am
Wednesday 8/16 9-11am POTATOES?!
Wednesday 8/16 6-8pm POTATOES?!
Friday 8/18 9-11am
Sunday 8/20 7-9am
Workshift sign-up instructions may be found here.
Thank you!
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August 13, 2017
Preserving the Harvest
How I Enjoyed My Harvest
By Linda Dansbury
How have you been enjoying your harvests? Please email me at lindadansbury@comcast.net and please put Anchor Run in the subject line.
This time of year I always feel a little overwhelmed by the sheer quantity and variety of the produce in my fridge. I think it's because when the tomatoes arrive we fill our bellies with them in a variety of ways - brushetta, caprese salad (aka tomato and mozzarella salad), and tomato bread and are then too stuffed to eat anything else but a simple meat and salad. In addition, my 3 dogs, flower and veggie gardens consume my evenings, so things start getting pushed into the back of the fridge. Sound familiar?
Today, I am going to clean out my fridge - I am going to make Tomatillo Sauce from the Stewed Chicken in Tomatillo Sauce. I love this recipe because it freezes well and the sauce is also good as a salsa to eat as a snack with tortilla chips and/or veggies.
I am also going to use up 2 weeks worth of eggplant - probably will make Baba Ganoush. Again, it freezes well for use during the fall and winter months. While I have the grill going to cook the eggplant, I will add the rest of summer squash and a few peppers to the grill - they will be a side dish for tonight and some will make a pasta salad for lunches during the week. When I get all of this completed I will definitely feel a sense of accomplishment and happiness that all this yummy food is awaiting my consumption!
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August 6, 2017
Into August, Into Cooler Temperatures...
Notes From The Field
By Derek McGeehan
Snagging a photo of ourselves, sans kids, working outside on the farm, happens very infrequently these farming days, but this time we're all smiles after harvesting a satisfying amount of a cantaloupe-type melon, a crop we're still determined to grow successfully with good yields and good taste. The variety this year appears to be a winner, though there are so many variables affecting a crop that it's hard to say if it is specifically the variety. It could also be our extra attention, kind weather, fertile soil, or all of the above. When cantaloupe-type melons begin ripening the patch must be checked daily or every other day because they ripen very quickly, almost uniformly, and quickly deteriate outside.
Watermelon, on the other hand, are slightly less temperamental in our minds, tolerate slightly more stress, and can hold in the field much longer when ripe. Too much water on an almost mature crop, though, can quickly kill the plants leaving almost ripe fruit to fend for themselves under the sun. This year we grew two plantings of watermelon, one of which has already been successfully harvested and stowed and will be distributed over the next couple of weeks. Round two is about ready so hopefully it will tolerate the incoming moisture inundation.
Onions are 95% harvested and safely stored. Next on the harvest to-do list is embarking on the 10,000 feet of potatoes. We're anticipating a good crop this year.
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August 6, 2017
Summertime Produce
Expected Harvest
By Derek McGeehan
Harvest #13 (Week A) should include scallions, fresh onions, carrots, cantaloupe, watermelon, lettuces, eggplant, sweet peppers, tomatoes, summer squash, cabbage, cucumbers, garlic, shishito peppers, hot peppers, parsley, Italian dandelion, Swiss chard, dill, okra, papalo, and cilantro. Some items will be a choice and/or may not be available during all pick up times. U-pick should include green string beans or yellow wax beans, cherry tomatoes, husk cherries, tomatillos, flowers, herbs, and hopefully blackberries.
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August 6, 2017
Potential New Land Protein Partnership
Other News
By Derek McGeehan
We're sad to announce that our partnership with Ledamete Grass Farm is now over. But, we're excited to announce that we've connected with another local and Certified Organic pastured animal farm, Hershberger Heritage Farm, located in Sellersville, Bucks County, PA. Please peruse their website to find out what they offer and to learn more about them. They plan to come to Anchor Run Farm Monday 8/14, Thursday 8/17, Monday 8/21, and Thursday 8/24 to introduce themselves and sell their products. We'll share more details about this new partnership in upcoming e-mails.
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August 6, 2017
Workshifts Scheduled for Week of 8/6/17
Other News
By Derek McGeehan
Flowering buckwheat cover crop
We're past the halfway point of the season for work hour opportunities. Workshifts will be scheduled through October but frequency will diminish in September. If you still need to work your pledged hours please consider signing up for a workshift soon. If you'd rather contribute financially to cover the work hour cost of your share please do so soon so that we can plan accordingly. E-mail us at anchorruncsa@gmail.com if you have any questions.Workshifts this week:
Wednesday 8/9 9-11am
Wednesday 8/9 2-4pm
Wednesday 8/9 6-8pm
Friday 8/11 9-11am
Sunday 8/13 7-9am
Workshift sign-up instructions may be found here.
Thank you!
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August 6, 2017
Yummy Peppers
Other News
By Linda Dansbury
Bumblebee about to land on flowering anise hyssop in the herb garden
To me, having written these columns now for a dozen years or so (Yikes!), peppers seem to come into the pick up room with virtually no fanfare or celebration - tomatoes and fresh garlic get all the attention. But peppers are delicious, nutritious and pretty. They are typically added to dishes rather than being the star. Hopefully this year's crop will be plentiful and long lasting because peppers are very versatile. Take a look at this site and you will see several interesting recipes: Eggplant Dip with Roasted Red Peppers, Pepper Puree, several versions of Roasted Red Peppers, and more. Every year I make several batches of Roasted Red Peppers, usually with garlic, olive oil and a splash of balsamic vinegar. They keep well in the fridge and I use them in sandwiches, as a bruschetta, and mixed into salads with other hearty ingredients. Last year, fellow member Carolyn Lyday sent me an email about Pepper Puree, opening my eyes to new uses for this veggie. The puree keeps well and can even be frozen, giving meals in the middle of winter a nice fresh taste.
Store peppers in plastic in your fridge for best keeping. They will keep for at least 10 days.
I wanted to find a recipe in which peppers take center stage - so I searched and found Grilled Pepper and Torn Mozzarella Panzanella. Panzanella is simply a bread salad - I often have parts of delicious, rustic breads from the farmers market left over and this is a great way to use them. Most panzanellas are made with tomatoes, but I decided to try this one. I hope you like it. Send your ideas to me at lindadansbury@comcast.net
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August 6, 2017
Delicious Tomatoes
How I Enjoyed My Harvest
By Linda Dansbury
Kids having a great time at the potluck!
The time we all eagerly wait for is finally here - the height of the tomato season! No other part of the country anticipates this season like we do - and Anchor Run farmers do it as well as anyone. Delicious, juicy, colorful heirloom tomatoes, field grown hybrids and yummy cherry tomatoes. I didn't cook much this past week due to a death in my family, but I did eat a lot of tomatoes. Here are a few things I did prepare.
Tomatoes, garlic, herbs - made one of the Uncooked Tomato Sauce recipes from this site. This is so colorful, simple and delicious. The heat from fresh cooked pasta barely cooks the tomatoes. Make the sauce at least an hour ahead for best flavor.
Green beans, garlic, scallions, hot pepper - made a string bean stir fry. Mince garlic and finely chop hot pepper to taste. Heat a wok or large skillet with a little peanut or other neutral oil. Add garlic and hot pepper and stir fry until just barely turning brown. Add beans and keep moving them around, letting them char in the wok a little. Add a bit of water and cover, allowing beans to steam for a few minutes. Remove lid, add chopped scallions, stir in soy sauce and sesame oil. Plate and top with sliced Thai basil and a squeeze of lime.
Eggplant, summer squash, peppers - as usual I grilled them and ate one night. The new thing here is that I had a lot leftover and I put them in the fridge for a few days. The next time I cooked I put the leftovers back on the grill to heat them up and they were as delicious as they had been the first night.
Please share how you enjoyed your harvest by emailing me at lindadansbury@comcast.net.
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