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News and Notes
from the Field

Posts Filtered by Month - October 2017 |
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October 29, 2017
November Already?
Notes From The Field
By Derek McGeehan
Time flies during our long (marathon) growing season. Three weekly pick ups for half a year for approximately 250 families each week and all of the preparations that go into growing high quality organic produce basically means there's no rest for the weary. But, hey, we like it! Of course, now that we're pushing harvests through the winter months means we're ever embarking on new challenges, such as how best to grow fresh produce in hoop houses and high tunnels throughout the cold months. Maybe eventually we'll have produce shares fully year round?
It's a labor of love that is possible and more meaningful because of the farm and business model we've been holding fast to thus far: Community Supported Agriculture. To be a fully functioning and successful farm for almost 15 years means that something is going well and right here and we hope that means we're providing you with the best possible produce we can grow with variety that pleases you.
We're ever grateful to you, our members, for your support. Your decision to be a part of Anchor Run means you are actively and directly fostering a healthy environment, local economy, and community. Thank you!
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October 29, 2017
Second to Last
Expected Harvest
By Derek McGeehan
Share #25 is similar to #24 and we ran out of time for a new photo! Close up of lettuce mix instead.
Main Season Share #25 (Week A) should include sweet potatoes, onions, leeks, scallions, kale, Swiss chard, collard greens, Italian dandelion, arugula, greens mix, spinach, lettuce, hakurei turnips, radishes, beets, kohlrabi, celeriac, and herbs.
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October 29, 2017
Fall Vegetable Stew
Member Ideas and Suggestions
By Linda Dansbury
Carrie Meunch sent me a recipe for Fall Vegetable Stew that she served with a side salad with a mix of spinach, lettuce, kale and scallions.
The recipe for the stew uses much of our harvests and should be thought of as a base recipe - you can add or subtract based on what is available.
Thank you Carrie for sharing - if anybody wants to share with the rest of membership, please email me at lindadansbury@comcast.net and please put Anchor Run in the Subject Line.
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October 29, 2017
Balance of Fresh and Storage Veggies
How I Enjoyed My Harvest
By Linda Dansbury
We are in that time of year when there is a nice balance of fresh veggies needing to be eaten fairly quickly and veggies that can be stored for weeks or even months. I find this an easy time - if we end up going out a couple of nights I don't worry about things going bad, and I don't have to scramble to use up all the greens. Shares will be similar to these through the Late Fall and Winter seasons. Below are a few things I made this past week. If you have anything to share, please send to me at lindadansbury@comcast.net
Spaghetti squash, Swiss chard, dandelion - this is so simple to do - perfect for a busy week night - and delicious too! Roast the spaghetti squash - I prefer this to microwaving as it results in even cooking of the squash and it is inactive cooking time, so you can do other things while it roasts. Cut in half, scoop out seeds and place cut side down in a baking dish. Add water to a half inch and place in a 425 degree oven for 35-55 min, depending on size of squash. When fork goes through skin fairly easily, it is done. Saute sausage (remove from casing) in pan until pink is gone. Add greens and chopped up hot pepper (mine was in freezer) or red pepper flakes to taste. Cook till wilted. Scrape the spaghetti squash into strands and split into bowls - shave parmesan cheese, olive oil, salt and pepper. Top with sausage mixture and top with more cheese, if desired.
Leeks, garlic, sweet potatoes, celeriac, cauliflower - roasted the veggies as described in my other article. Mixed roast goes with just about everything!
Spinach, leek - made the Spinach Salad with Warm Bacon Dressing. It calls for using a shallot, but I substitute with leeks right now.
Onion/leek, garlic, greens - made a large batch of chili and added a few greens at the end.
Cauliflower, leek, parsley - made a very simple version of cauliflower rice. Just pulse in food processor until it resembles cous cous. Saute leek in large pan. When leek is soft, add the cauliflower and salt and pepper, continue to cook, stirring frequently until soft, 3-5 minutes. Remove from heat and sprinkle with parsley and lemon juice. We had it with roasted chicken.
Leek, edamame (frozen from my U pick), greens, parsley - made risotto, once again adding some greens at the end - I chopped the greens fairly fine, so they "melted" into the rice.
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October 29, 2017
Join the Late Fall CSA and Winter CSA (2 seasons)!
Other News
by Dana Hunting
Lettuce (let us) grow produce for you this fall and winter! Affordable, abundant, organic, satisfyingly good, and nutritious vegetables! Why not?
Membership is still available for the 2017 6-week Late Fall CSA (mid-Nov through mid-Dec) as well as the 2017-2018 10-week Winter CSA (end-Dec through end-Feb). Click here for more information and to sign up!
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October 29, 2017
Ugly But Delicious Celeriac
Other News
By Linda Dansbury
Celeriac is one of those veggies that if you are not familiar with it and you have a choice, you would probably choose to skip over it, but don't! It is delicious and nutritious. A sister to celery (actually a type of celery bred for its root), it is low calorie and fairly high in potassium and vitamin C.
Celeriac stores well in the fridge, lasting for months. Prepare it by carefully cutting away the tough, rough, outer covering (or skip the peeling part if you're like Derek and Dana and don't mind skin on your root veggies). Celeriac can be eaten raw or cooked. To eat it raw, make sure to get a "dressing" on it quickly or place in cold water with a squeeze of lemon as it oxidizes and turns brown the way potatoes and apples do when cut. Try grating some into coleslaw or making the French Remoulade which is light and delicious. There are many recipes for celeriac on this site for salads, soups, roasted veggies and more using this flexible root vegetable.
Two simple ways I enjoy it is to mix it with other roasted veggies - think a combo of some or all of the following: potatoes, sweet potatoes, leeks, garlic, winter squash, turnips, celeriac, cauliflower, beets, radishes, onions, etc. Just cut all the veggies up into a similar size and place onto a large baking sheet - drizzle olive oil, add salt and pepper to taste, mix well, and spread in a single layer. If you want, add a few sprigs of thyme or rosemary. Roast at about 425 degrees until veggies are tender and browned in spots - usually around 45 minutes. I also like it in what I call "mixed mash" - a combo of potatoes, sweet potatoes and celeriac - all boiled and mashed together - YUM!
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October 29, 2017
Workshifts Scheduled for Week of 10/29/17
Other News
by Dana Hunting
If you still need to work your pledged hours please consider signing up for a workshift soon! In other words, when you joined the CSA you purchased a share "with work discount" instead of a share "without working".
Now that we're into November, if you'd rather contribute financially to cover the work hour cost of your share please do so soon so that we can plan accordingly. And please don't feel guilty about it! The buyout option makes it fair for all members.
$60 covers the 4 hours for a Half Share; $90 covers the 6 hours for a Medium Share; and $120 covers the 8 hours for a Full Share. E-mail us at anchorruncsa@gmail.com if you have any questions.
Workshifts this week:
- Friday 11/3 10am-12noon
- Sunday 11/5 9-11am
Workshift sign-up instructions may be found here.
Thank you!
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October 22, 2017
First Frost then Continued Warmth
Notes From The Field
By Derek McGeehan
The lovely days of this autumn continue. This past week felt like the best weather of the season. The needed rain of the prior week helped what is probably the last round of cover crops to germinate (shown above are oats and crimson clover). Though we're finished cover cropping we still have edible crops to direct seed in the next location for our movable high tunnel (2,880-sq-ft). Into there will go winter greens like arugula, baby kale, mizuna, tatsoi, and mustard greens. After seeding we'll let Tuesday's rain assist in germination then will slide the structure over top of the beds to protect them for the next 4 months. Since there are 5 raised beds in there we'll probably plant 3 now and 2 in two weeks to spread out maturity in December and January. Over the next 3 weeks we'll also transplant seedlings into the hoop house (1,170-sq-ft), hoop tunnel (3,024-sq-ft), and green house (1,152-sq-ft) for Late Fall CSA and Winter CSA harvests.
This past week we had our annual Organic Inspection and of course passed with flying colors! The Friday prior we also hosted a representative from Pennsylvania Association for Sustainable Agriculture (PASA) to collect soil samples for a Cornell soil study. It feels good to see almost 10 years of our continued soil improvements impress folks in this business! We conduct soil tests every 3 years or so and of course they tell us about calcium, magnesium, phosphorous, potassium, sulfur, zinc, boron, etc., but simple observation of crops, cover crops, and soil structure is just as important, if not more so. You can feel and see the soil health here, now. That translates to healthy food for you and me.
Covering the replacement hoop tunnel, a family affair.
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October 22, 2017
So Sweet Potato
Expected Harvest
By Derek McGeehan
Harvest #24 (Week B) should include sweet potatoes, garlic, leeks, scallions, cauliflower, a root choice (radishes, kohlrabi, turnips, celeriac, beets), kale, Swiss chard, spinach, lettuce, a greens choice (arugula, broccoli raab, mizuna, Italian dandelion, collards), and an herb choice (dill, cilantro, parsley). Some items may not be available during all pick up times.
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October 22, 2017
Shares Still Available For Late Fall CSA and Winter CSA (2 seasons)!
Other News
by Dana Hunting
Fresh greens at the end of December 2016!
Membership is still available for the 2017 6-week Late Fall CSA (mid-Nov through mid-Dec) as well as the 2017-2018 10-week Winter CSA (end-Dec through end-Feb). Click here for more information and to sign up!
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October 22, 2017
Workshifts Scheduled for Week of 10/22/17
Other News
By Derek McGeehan
Sunday's workshift harvesting carrots on a beautiful fall morning!
If you still need to work your pledged hours please consider signing up for a workshift soon! In other words, when you joined the CSA you purchased a share "with work discount" instead of a share "without working". If you'd rather contribute financially to cover the work hour cost of your share please do so soon so that we can plan accordingly. And please don't feel guilty about it! The buyout option makes it fair for all members.
$60 covers the 4 hours for a Half Share; $90 covers the 6 hours for a Medium Share; and $120 covers the 8 hours for a Full Share. E-mail us at anchorruncsa@gmail.com if you have any questions.
Workshifts this week:
- Friday 10/27 10am-12noon
- Sunday 10/29 9-11am
Workshift sign-up instructions may be found here.
Thank you!
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October 22, 2017
Enjoying Healthy Greens
How I Enjoyed My Harvest
By Linda Dansbury
Some weeks fly by so fast that I have trouble remembering on Sundays what I made in the past week - this is one of those weeks! Because we were away for 3 nights, I concentrated on consuming our greens, broccoli and cauliflower in the nights we had. If you have any ideas to share on how you enjoyed your harvest, please email me at lindadansbury@comcast.net
  • Broccoli, cauliflower - cooked up a lot of it for dinner one night and then made the leftovers into a salad with brown rice that I also had leftover.
  • Kale, garlic, cilantro - made the Kale Rice Bowl on this site. We use local ground pork, which makes all the difference in this dish.
  • Mixed greens (Swiss chard, dandelion, greens mix), garlic, leek, scallion - sauteed leek and garlic in a large pan, then added the Swiss chard stems and cooked until tender. Added the mixed greens that I had chopped. When almost tender I made holes in the greens and cracked an egg into each well. Covered the pan and cooked until the egg whites were cooked but yolk was still runny, about 2-3 minutes. Carefully plated the servings, keeping the yolks in tact until we could break them and make a sauce in the pile of greens.
  • Leeks, potatoes, carrots, a little garlic, thyme, greens - made a stewed chicken dish like my grandmother used to do. Brown the chicken parts and remove from pan. Add leeks and saute, then add a bit of garlic and saute until you can smell it. Add a little white wine to deglaze, scraping up all the little brown bits. Add chicken stock and thyme and bring to a boil. Place chicken back in pan, turn down the heat and cover and let simmer for about 15 minutes. Add carrots, little potatoes to pan, cover, and let cook until carrots and potatoes are tender and the meat is falling off the bone - about 45 minutes. You can stop here and enjoy, or I added a little bit of chopped spinach and mizuna and just let wilt for a couple minutes. Yum!
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October 22, 2017
More about Greens
Other News
By Linda Dansbury
We receive a lot of greens each week. Several pounds in fact! I used to make a lot of pestos and freeze quite a bit (more on easy freezing method below), and that worked when harvests ended at Thanksgiving, but now that it continues well into February, I want to use as much as I can when fresh, or things sit in my freezer and eventually are tossed due to freezer burn. Some greens can be used in multiple ways so I sometimes split them up shortly after I receive them - for instance I will put a few dandelion leaves with the salad greens and put the rest in the cooking group.
My strategy is to group greens into how I will use them - salads, smoothies, cook, preserve (either freeze or pesto/pistou for me)
  • Smoothies - regular smoothie eaters know how they like theirs. I mostly use kale and Swiss chard but have also used mizuna and the greens mix.
  • Salads - lettuces, arugula, spinach, dandelion, small Swiss chard and kale leaves, mizuna, small greens mix leaves.
  • Cooked - Tat soi, kale, Swiss chard, greens mix, broccoli raab, mustard greens, dandelion. Find recipes on this site or others and remember that many of the greens are interchangeable so if a recipe asks for spinach to be added, save your spinach for a salad, and add any or all of this list to the recipe instead.
  • Pesto, Pistou - arugula, broccoli raab - I have found for the raab that if the garlic is roasted before using in the pesto it makes it less bitter. Blanching prior to use helps too.
  • Preserving - any of the greens listed in the cooked line. A fellow member shared a great method of preserving that is so simple! Bring a large pot of water to a boil. While the water is heating, prepare whatever greens you want to preserve - remove thick stems, yellowing leaves, and rinse well. Place a colander in the sink and fill with the greens. Carefully pour boiling water over the greens and allow to drain. When cool enough to handle, squeeze the water out and make the greens into balls. Place into freezer containers or bags and freeze. So easy to pull a ball or two out of the freezer to add to soups and stews!
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October 15, 2017
Rain and Cauliflower Events
Notes From The Field
By Derek McGeehan
View from Field 5 facing south...or maybe the Adirondack Mountains.
We received the rain that we needed after 5 weeks of dry weather. Now, after days of cloudy misty weather we're again looking forward to some sun and drying out. These moist days interfere with the bleached white quality of the cauliflower which are huge and very prolific right now. Somehow we had overlooked the patch, thinking it wasn't quite ready for sustained picking, then were slightly overwhelmed by the 500 pounds that came out of the field on Tuesday, followed by another 250 pounds on Wednesday, and I expect to harvest another couple hundred pounds today. Harvesting this weight solo proves adequate daily exercise. Broccoli is waning but cauliflower should be around all week.
On the farm right now we're trying to deal with soooooo many crops that are ready for harvest, plus great roots that are already in storage. With the sustained heat of late September and early October, many of our crops raced to maturity instead of growing slowly as they typically do this time of year. Even with the dry weather all of our greens grew explosively (the price we pay I guess for improved soil conditions and fertility). Many of the greens are cut-and-come-again, but benefit the most when they're cut before they get too big. Since we currently have so many crops at our disposal to distribute, we're trying our best to craft shares that are hopefully most appealing to you, plus offer choices.
Any feedback on shares would be appreciated. Very soon we'll send you a survey to fill out.
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October 15, 2017
Embrace the Sweet Potato
Expected Harvest
By Derek McGeehan
Harvest #23 (Week A) should include sweet potatoes, garlic, leeks, scallions, broccoli, cauliflower, savoy cabbage, spinach, kale, Swiss chard, arugula, broccoli raab, mizuna, mustard greens mix, lettuce, dill, cilantro, and parsley. Some items will be a choice and may not be available during all pick up times.
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October 15, 2017
Diaper Drive
Other News
by Alescia Dingle
I am a CSA member and also a new member of the board for the Greater Philadelphia Diaper Bank (GPDB). I am running a diaper drive during the month of October and I wanted to ask if you would be so kind to share information in your newsletter and if I could have a cardboard box on site at the farm for any members who want to contribute. GPDB has distributed more than 2.4 million diapers to families in need since 2011 across Greater Philadelphia and parts of New Jersey. This month alone they distributed more than 62,000 diapers to families in need including those affected by natural disasters across the country.
One in three families experiences diaper need. This means that they cannot afford clean diapers for babies, toddlers and even adults. SNAP & WIC dollars do not cover the cost of diapers for struggling families. During the month of October I will have drop off locations in Hamilton Township, NJ,New Hope, PA and online for friends at a distance. Please help a neighbor in need by dropping off a package of diapers or making a donation online. Your donation will help The Greater Philadelphia Diaper Bank distribute diapers to families in need. This month alone GPDB distributed more than 62,000 diapers to families in need in New Jersey, Pennsylvania as well as families affected by the natural disasters across the country. Clean diapers promote good health, prevent staph infections, and allow little ones to attend preschool and parents and caregivers to go to work. Clean diapers mean heath and independence for adults. Clean Diapers are not a Privilege. We believe that all of us: babies, children and adults deserve to be clean and dry.
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October 15, 2017
Rest In Peace, Jack Schieber, Long Time CSA Member
Other News
By Dana Hunting
John R. "Jack" Schieber, Jr. of Holland passed away on Wednesday, September 20, 2017 in the presence of his loving family. He was 92.
He was the loving and devoted husband of Rose Marie Kraiser Schieber, his companion for more than 70 years.
Born in Philadelphia, Jack was the son of the late John R. Schieber, Sr. and Gertrude Anna Kellenbenz Schieber.
Jack graduated from the University of Pennsylvania with a degree in Chemical Engineering. He worked at Betz Laboratories in Trevose, PA for 35 years, solving industrial water treatment problems.
A veteran of World War II, he continued to work for peace, justice, civil and human rights throughout his life. Jack was an avid outdoorsman, nature lover, explorer, a leader, a music lover, and a student of religious thought and practices. He was a beloved and long time member of the Mohawk Canoe Club, BuxMont Unitarian Universalist Fellowship and the Delaware Valley Fern and Wildflower Society and was active in numerous community endeavors.
In addition to his wife, Jack is survived by his children, Robin Hoy (Michael), David Schieber (Kat), Kendra Schieber (Ron Ogden) and Gil Schieber (Becky Brindle); his grandchildren, Lisa, Karin, David, Lauren, Scotland and Anselm; and his great-grandchildren, Julia, Caitlyn, Megan and Michael. He is also survived by his brother, Bill Schieber (Aileen), sisters in law, brothers in law and many nieces and nephews.
Relatives and friends are invited to join his family at a Memorial Service on Monday, October 16th at 11 AM at the BuxMont Unitarian Universalist Fellowship, 2040 Street Road, Warrington, PA 18976.
Contributions may be made in his memory to Bowman’s Hill Wildflower Preserve, 1635 River Rd, New Hope, PA 18938; Churchville Nature Center, 501 Churchville Lane, Churchville, PA 18966; or to the Bucks County Peace Center, 102 W Maple Ave, Langhorne, PA 19047
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October 15, 2017
Shares Available For Late Fall CSA and Winter CSA (2 seasons)!
Other News
by Dana Hunting
Construction continues on our replacement movable hoop tunnel for winter greens.
Membership is now available for the 2017 6-week Late Fall CSA (mid-Nov through mid-Dec) as well as the 2017-2018 10-week Winter CSA (end-Dec through end-Feb). Click here for more information and to sign up!
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October 15, 2017
Oh Glorious Greens!
How I Enjoyed My Harvest
By Linda Dansbury
I love the abundance of greens in the fall (and also in the spring)! Do I feel overwhelmed by the volume and variety? No - see how I enjoyed them below. Let me know how you enjoy your harvest by e-mailing me at lindadansbury@comcast.net and please put Anchor Run in the subject line.
Kale - I had almost forgotten about Kale Chips until I saw an expensive bag of them in the grocery store. I like sprinkling them with smoked paprika - it gives them a nice flavor.
Spinach, mizuna, lettuce, arugula, scallions - I really like a salad that combines several greens together - the variety of flavors and textures keeps it from getting boring and makes a great side dish for any entree. Experiment with different vinegars and oils and vary the herbs to make a new creation with every meal. A squeeze of lemon juice brightens greens that are raw or cooked and adding grated raw beets or cut up roasted beets is also delicious.
Broccoli, cauliflower, garlic, scallions, Swiss chard, parsley - made a large pasta dish. Started by roasting broccoli and cauliflower along with some garlic. Removed from oven when almost tender and nicely browned. Meanwhile, sauteed scallions, more garlic and the stems of Swiss chard. When tender, I added the chopped Swiss chard leaves and turned the heat off so the chard would barely wilt. Cooked the pasta and after drained, I immediately added all the veggies, parsley, pepper, good olive oil and grated cheese. Ate it with dinner and as a couple of lunches.
Butternut squash - a couple of my squash had spots that would have caused the entire squash to go bad, so when I already had the oven on to roast beets I roasted the butternut squash. Scooped the flesh out and then put into freezer bag so when I want to make something using cooked squash, more than half the prep time is already done.
Eggplant, onions, tomatoes - made the Eggplant Spread that is on this site. It was given to me by a summer intern a few years ago, and was a delicious way to use the last of the farm eggplant.
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October 15, 2017
Broccoli and Cauliflower Tip
Other News
By Linda Dansbury
"I had to expand this section using my own words, to educate myself and membership." - Farmer Derek
Because our farm broccoli and cauliflower are raised organically they're more susceptible to a variety of pests and diseases in the field that conventional and sprayed organic farms might be able to treat for. Thus, after harvest and in storage they can deteriorate quickly so they should be eaten or cooked very soon after pick up.
We do all that we can to minimize pest and disease pressure on the farm in a proactive and preventative way: crop rotation, clean seed source, soil improvements like cover cropping and mineral amendments, healthy transplants, a clean and weed minimal field, floating row cover barriers. However, it is impossible to remove/eradicate all sources of scourge since there are many wild species of plants that act as hosts to our "enemies". Normally the pest pressure remains in the background, is tolerable, until conditions allow for extreme spreading.
Of the plethora of pest pressures we deal with on the farm that impact the growing of brassica family crops (cabbage, broccoli, cauliflower, kale, ect.), in the fall the two main issues we face are bacterial black rot (aka Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris) and nibbling by insects such as the harlequin bug, imported cabbage worm, cabbage looper, and cross-striped cabbage worm (more info).
The current warm and moist weather pattern exacerbates the black rot problem which spreads very quickly during these conditions. Crops that are unfortunately most susceptible seem to be broccoli and cauliflower which I believe is also because the harlequin bugs seem to enjoy munching on them the most, assisting in its spread. Of course, every time we walk through the fields to harvest these crops we also trail around the spores helping it spread. But don't worry; it's not like the entire field is a mass of smelly rotting brassicas (not yet at least). The symptoms are just obvious to you as the eater in the form of a soft/dark spot or blemish on the head. The sunny dry weather forecast for this week should halt or slow its spread. We're also near the end of the broccoli and cauliflower harvest but will need to monitor closely the adjacent cabbage patch.
Okay, back to Linda...
In my case I found what the problem was: cabbage worms/loopers hiding in the florettes! Even under refrigeration, those damaging critters keep eating, causing the heads to rot.
I learned that if I know I am not going to eat the broc/caul within a couple days, I cut the heads and carefully look for those dastardly worms and commit wormicide on any I come across. The result is the veggies keep much longer once they are not being "eaten alive".
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October 15, 2017
Workshifts Scheduled for Week of 10/15/17
Other News
By Derek McGeehan
Friday's workshift harvesting kohlrabi.
If you still need to work your pledged hours please consider signing up for a workshift soon! In other words, when you joined the CSA you purchased a share "with work discount" instead of a share "without working". If you'd rather contribute financially to cover the work hour cost of your share please do so soon so that we can plan accordingly. And please don't feel guilty about it! The buyout option makes it fair for all members.
$60 covers the 4 hours for a Half Share; $90 covers the 6 hours for a Medium Share; and $120 covers the 8 hours for a Full Share. E-mail us at anchorruncsa@gmail.com if you have any questions.
Workshifts this week:
- Wednesday 10/18 10am-12noon
- Friday 10/20 10am-12noon
- Sunday 10/22 9-11am
Workshift sign-up instructions may be found here.
Thank you!
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October 8, 2017
Where's The Rain?
Notes From The Field
By Derek McGeehan
(Rain) Dancing to Goose Creek Pioneers!
Last week was a busy one. Tuesday marked 4 weeks since any meaningful rain fell on the farm so I spent a couple of days setting up the infrastructure for and irrigating thirsty crops. I believe that all annual crops received enough ground water to keep them content for another week or two, depending on sun, heat, and wind. As of now we're forecast to receive rain today/tonight/tomorrow but I'm feeling a bit apprehensive. I'm prepared to celebrate in earnest when the precipitation finally quenches this dry patch of earth. Over the past few days forecast amounts went from 2" to now less than .5". If it doesn't rain I'll just go through another round of irrigating. Now that it's mostly set up it will be easier to apply.
Additionally, we harvested turnips, radishes, and beets for storage; harvested a mountain of broccoli and cauliflower for last week's and this week's distribution; finalized ground stakes' depth and pitch and erected arches for the hoop tunnel; prepared for and sowed cover crops; and plenty of other miscellany.
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October 8, 2017
A Panoply of Greens, Choices
Expected Harvest
By Derek McGeehan
Harvest #22 (Week B) should include broccoli, cauliflower, savoy cabbage, beets, kohlrabi, potatoes, leeks, scallions, hot peppers, garlic, dill, parsley, cilantro, kale, collards, chard, spinach, arugula, mizuna, mustard greens mix, broccoli raab, green tomatoes, and mini lettuces. Some items will be a choice and may not be available during all pick up times. U-pick should include herbs.
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October 8, 2017
Wild for Salmon, Seafood Buying Club Order
Other News
by Dana Hunting
Place your order by October 22nd with Wild For Salmon for the best quality and sustainably harvested salmon, fish, and seafood from the wilds of Bristol Bay, Alaska, delivered conveniently to our farm.
For information and to order, please click this link. It will open a page with all of the necessary information you need to join our buying club, learn more about Wild For Salmon, and to place your order.
Please contact Wild For Salmon if you have any questions on ordering or on their products. They will deliver your order to the farm on Thursday, October 26th, for you to retrieve 1-8pm. Please let us know if you cannot make it during that pick up window and we should be able to hold your order here in our freezer.
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October 8, 2017
Using Up Summer Bounty
How I Enjoyed My Harvest
By Linda Dansbury
I recently have looked for ways to use the end of the summer bounty, plus new ways to enjoy all these beautiful greens - lettuce has been spotty in the pick up room (it will pick up now), so wanted to make things that would make me not miss my greens salads.
Beets, scallions, greens - roasted and made beets into a salad. The nice thing about this is you can roast a lot of beets at one time. Once the beets are in a vinaigrette, they keep for over a week, so make once and enjoy 2-3 times.
Kale - made the Kale Caesar Salad that is on this site. I find the act of massaging the kale to be relaxing and fun - so get your hands in there!
Peppers, tomatoes, garlic and parsley - prepared a large batch of Romesco Sauce. I haven't added this one to the website at this point - there are multiple variations of it and at this point, the peppers at the farm are finished. I am letting you know about it in case you still have peppers in your garden or fridge. It is best prepared with red peppers, so the color of my batch isn't as pretty because of the various colors of the peppers. I froze a nice amount in small containers to use later over fish and veggies.
Eggplant, Thai basil, mint, garlic, scallions - again, in order to use up my eggplants, I made the Thai-style Eggplant Salad that is on this site.
Mixed Greens, garlic, onion - made the Coconut Honey Miso Greens that Carolyn Diana sent in a few weeks ago. Yum!
If you have any recipes or methods of enjoying your harvest that you would like to share, please send to me at lindadansbury@comcast.net.
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October 8, 2017
Shares Available For Late Fall CSA and Winter CSA (2 seasons)!
Other News
by Dana Hunting
Slowly but surely the replacement hoop tunnel rises.
Membership is now available for the 2017 6-week Late Fall CSA (mid-Nov through mid-Dec) as well as the 2017-2018 10-week Winter CSA (end-Dec through end-Feb). Click here for more information and to sign up!
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October 8, 2017
Workshifts Scheduled for Week of 10/8/17
Other News
By Derek McGeehan
Some of your Farmers (Dana and Derek) enjoying the potluck on a warm summery October evening!
If you still need to work your pledged hours please consider signing up for a workshift soon! In other words, when you joined the CSA you purchased a share "with work discount" instead of a share "without working". If you'd rather contribute financially to cover the work hour cost of your share please do so soon so that we can plan accordingly. And please don't feel guilty about it! The buyout option makes it fair for all members.
$60 covers the 4 hours for a Half Share; $90 covers the 6 hours for a Medium Share; and $120 covers the 8 hours for a Full Share. E-mail us at anchorruncsa@gmail.com if you have any questions.
Workshifts this week:
- Wednesday 10/11 6-8pm: Garlic processing in barn, separating bulbs into cloves for planting the 2018 crop. This shift is physically easier on the body but does require finger and hand movement. BYOB festivity (bring a beverage of your choosing for yourself and/or to share)!
- Friday 10/13 10am-12noon
Workshift sign-up instructions may be found here.
Thank you!
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October 8, 2017
Delicious Kale Salad Recipe
Member Ideas and Suggestions
By Linda Dansbury
Greens Galore!
Alice Maxfield sent me 2 recipes, one of which I am adding this week, the other I will talk about next week. For this week, Kale Salad with Quinoa, Dried Cranberries and Almonds is a delicious fall salad! Alices's comment was she really enjoys this salad when we have not received much lettuce from the farm - I agree, and this one sound great - I can't wait to try it!
Thank you Alice!
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October 1, 2017
Time to Add Water
Notes From The Field
By Derek McGeehan
Swales around the replacement hoop tunnel are being watered again. The oats are thriving, but the regular grass seed wasn't too happy about the dry weather and 90 degree heat. At least the ground stakes are going in, hopefully straight/true/square/perfect.
Farm dog Borchie contrasts the dark green salad turnip and radish greens. These crops are probably quite thirsty at this point. Plan is to overhead irrigate this field since most beds are smothered by canopies of greens, rendering application of drip tape impossible.
Checking on newly seeded crops for winter production: lettuce mix, claytonia, Swiss chard, spinach, mizuna, tatsoi, dill, and cilantro. These crops were seeded Friday 9/29, will be transplanted in early November, and harvested and eaten in December, January, and February. There are several successions of transplanted crops for the hoop house, hoop tunnel, and greenhouse, as well as a couple successions of direct seeded crops for the movable high tunnel (kale, arugula, mizuna, mustard greens).
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October 1, 2017
October Dry
Expected Harvest
By Derek McGeehan
Harvest #21 (Week A) should include lettuce, spinach, kale, collards, Swiss chard, cauliflower, broccoli, potatoes, leeks, onions, sweet peppers, tomatoes, hot peppers, arugula, mizuna, mustard greens, dill, parsley, cilantro, cabbage, beets, kohlrabi, celeriac, and garlic. Some items will be a choice and may not be available during all pick up times. U-pick should include herbs.
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October 1, 2017
Workshifts Scheduled for Week of 10/1/17
Other News
By Derek McGeehan
If you still need to work your pledged hours please consider signing up for a workshift soon! In other words, when you joined the CSA you purchased a share "with work discount" instead of a share "without working". If you'd rather contribute financially to cover the work hour cost of your share please do so soon so that we can plan accordingly. And please don't feel guilty about it! The buyout option makes it fair for all members.
$60 covers the 4 hours for a Half Share; $90 covers the 6 hours for a Medium Share; and $120 covers the 8 hours for a Full Share. E-mail us at anchorruncsa@gmail.com if you have any questions.
Workshifts this week:
- Tuesday 10/3 10am-12noon
- Wednesday 10/4 10am-12noon
- Friday 10/6 10am-12noon
- Sunday 10/8 8-10am
Workshift sign-up instructions may be found here.
Thank you!
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