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News and Notes
from the Field

Posts Filtered by Month - June 2018 |
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June 24, 2018
Summertime
Notes From The Field
by Farmer Derek

Pepper plants freshly staked and mowed thanks to farm staff.
Seasons changed this past week and along with the planet's relative location to the sun along its orbit our farm work begins to transition to more harvesting and crop maintenance and slightly less ground preparation for planting. This translates to a hopefully reduced amount of time I have to spend on the tractor. Harvests transition now as well, with the early summer crops of zucchini and cucumbers beginning to increase exponentially. Strawberries are unfortunately waning but in their place raspberries are coming in. Peas will end soon but beans are ripening and will be in shares for a couple of months if all goes as planned. Turnips, kohlrabi, radishes, endive, escarole, and romaine will exit shares until the fall. Chard, kale, and dandelion should be in shares to satisfy the need for cooking greens. Lettuces will be abundant for a while (our plan is for them to be available the entire season).
Last week was a busy time. With the continued lack of rain irrigation had to be set up and used. Around 5,000 leeks and 2,000 celeriac were planted, along with the 3rd installment of zucchini and cumbers, the 12th planting of lettuces, the 6th of scallions, dill, cilantro, and the 4th of basil and beans. Thousands of bed feet had to be finalized for all of those plants and another few thousand made ready for the 7,000 strawberry plants that are arriving this coming week.
Since we're now in summer it's worth briefly reflecting on spring's treatment of the farm. Overall I think harvests have been good and I'm thankful for that. Some crops suffered from our wettest May ever, such as spinach, which we lost 70% of, and radishes, which split and cracked. Early spring greens like arugula bolted prematurely, I'm assuming from the hot days we endured while the crops were covered to keep insects out. The 1st planting of beets was great, which came out of our movable high tunnel, but numbers 2 and 3 are a bit delayed and smaller than we would like. Peas and strawberries have been as good as we could ask for. We were very lucky the extremely wet weather didn't coincide with the strawberry season. Pea shoots didn't work out as well as I remembered them from years past; they weren't as tender as we would have liked. The turnips coming out of our hoop tunnel were more damaged than is ideal however the kohlrabi was great. Head lettuce, romaine lettuce, endive, escarole, and radicchio have been great. Kale met its potential but Swiss chard did not. We lost the 1st planting to leaf miner and plantings 2-4 were slow growing, perhaps also due to the excess moisture. They're now happier and will be harvested into the foreseeable future. Italian dandelion has been a reliable producer like always.
Ultimately we hope you've enjoyed the harvests thus far and are excited to eat the next phase of food coming out of our organically managed soils and farm with the help of our farm crew and members and support from our community.
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June 24, 2018
Summer Transition
Expected Harvest
by Farmer Derek
Main Season Harvest #6 (Week B) should include garlic scapes, scallions, cabbage, zucchini (yellow and green), cucumbers, lettuce, herbs (dill, cilantro, basil, parsley), raspberries, fennel, celery, and greens (chard, kale, dandelion, radicchio, endive). U-pick should include peas, flowers, herbs, and the last of the strawberries.
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June 24, 2018
Fennel, Peas and other Delights!
How I Enjoyed My Harvest
By Linda Dansbury
The diversity of crops is increasing exponentially week-to-week. Here is a snapshot of how I enjoyed my harvest. Please share how you enjoyed your harvest at lindadansbury@comcast.net. and please put Anchor Run in the subject line.
Summer squash, scapes, scallions - grilling is often my cooking method of choice. There are so many ways to prepare summer squash but my go to and favorite way to enjoy it is to grill it. I normally slice it into what looks like pickle spears. Drizzle with olive oil and then place on a grill allowing it to turn brown, but cooking slowly enough that it can soften a bit. Once done, it can be used in so many ways - plain and eaten with another drizzle of olive oil (or not), salt and pepper and/or chopped fresh herbs; added to a pasta dish, either in a hot pasta dish or cold one. This time, I chopped up the list from above and made a room temperature salad, adding a vinaigrette made of a bit of balsamic vinegar, Dijon mustard, olive oil and salt and pepper. One mixed, I added a generous amount of chopped basil and a small grating of Parm cheese. So yummy my mouth is watering just thinking about it!
Beets, greens, scapes, scallions -no, you didn't miss the beets in the pick up room. I had not used mine up yet (although the greens were long eaten in a dish). I roasted my 2 weeks worth at one time, peeled them and placed in fridge. Once roasted, there is so much you can do with them. I made the Roasted Beet and Beet Green Risotto, but instead of beet greens, I used dandelion and Radicchio. For the rest of my beets, I made a vinaigrette and added scallion, scapes and sliced roasted beets. This preparation keeps for a couple weeks and I will either use with the beets as the focus or add a couple slices to green salads.
Fennel, parsley - made the Shaved Fennel and Parmesan Salad. Year-to-year, I forget about recipes on this site. So, as we receive crops I search again and am always happy to find great ways to use our veggies. This salad is so simple and delicious - I am not always a fan of eating fennel raw, but the combination of parsley, thyme and lemon juice and the addition of Parm cheese is such a delicious combination - try it!
Peas - I have to say that this week, I didn't cook any of the peas. Instead, I snacked on them raw. So sweet, these peas need nothing added. I ate some along with lunches and when I came home from work really hungry I grabbed a handful and dipped them in hummus (if I had thought ahead, I would have defrosted one of the few containers of baba ganoush I still have in my freezer from last year's eggplant crop - but more about that at a later date)!
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June 24, 2018
Workshifts for Week of 6/25/18
Other News
by Dana Hunting

Workshifts will help pick wonderful raspberries for shares this week!
Workshifts scheduled for this week
  • Tuesday (6/26) 9-11am
  • Wednesday (6/27) 9-11am
  • Wednesday (6/27) 6-8pm
  • Friday (6/29) 9-11am
  • Sunday (7/1) 8-10am
Workshift sign-up instructions may be found here.
Workshifts typically meet under the large red maple just outside of the pick up room. Please wear appropriate clothes and footwear for working outside and bring your own gloves and water.
Thank you!
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June 24, 2018
What to do with Fennel?
Other News
By Linda Dansbury
Fennel is one of those veggies that most people have heard of, but many do not know what to do with it. Fennel is high in fiber, potassium, folate, vitamin C, vitamin B-6, and phytonutrients, which all support heart health. So, it makes sense to incorporate it into your diet. Fennel is one of those crops that is very flexible in how it can be enjoyed - raw in a crudite platter, added to a salad or as the star ingredient in a salad, roasted, grilled, put in smoothies, or cooked for long periods of time. We normally receive 2 crops of fennel - now, as in early summer and then again in the fall. For the summer crop I like to grill or make it into a salad, while in the fall I like to roast it or simmer it as in Seafood Stew with lots of Herbs. There are a few fennel salad recipes (1, 2, 3) on this site, plus Shaved Fennel Salad with Parmesan and the Radicchio, Fennel and Proscuitto Salad - all of which are delicious - we will receive fennel for the next few weeks, so try them all! The technique for grilling is also on this site. Fennel keeps for at least 2 weeks when stored in plastic in the fridge, so you can save up for a couple weeks and have more of it to use if you have a larger family.
Please enjoy and send me how you like to use your veggies at lindadansbury@comcast.net and please put Anchor Run in the subject line so I can find your email.
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June 24, 2018
U Pick Note
Other News
By Linda Dansbury
The u-pick flower garden is now open for picking. Pictured above are salvia flowers with buckwheat in the aisles, which will soon be mowed.
I did my U Pick yesterday and it was really pleasant to do so - several of you also spent time in the field. The peas are VERY plentiful!! If you go to the far end of the rows the pea pods are hanging on the ends of the stems like little Christmas ornaments on a tree - you will finish picking your allotment in just a few minutes. If, when you get to the field, others have found those, don't be discouraged - there are a lot, and I mean a lot of pea pods under the plants - walking the rows they are not obvious, but just squat down and you will see them.
As for strawberries, I am sure there are still a few small berries on all the plants, but the bottom few rows still have some large berries too. Just be patient and look carefully - you definitely have to get down near the plants and gently move the leaves around to see them - walking along the rows only reveals a berry here and there.
Be sure to try and get to the field today (if this is your week to pick) or in the next few days before the heat comes in. Peas do not like the heat, and although Derek will irrigate if needed, based on the forecast, by next weekend the plants are likely to start to suffer plus the weather will not be as enjoyable to spend time picking.
Also, if your farm-provided u-pick containers are still in good shape, please bring them back to the farm for re-use.
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June 17, 2018
Brief Heat Wave
Notes From The Field
By Derek McGeehan
Honeybee on flowering greens (arugula, mustard, raab) that decided to flower before we were able to harvest all of them.
Predictably the pendulum swings the other way: sun, wind, heat, and dry conditions are here. Irrigation has been turned back on and needs to be double checked and fixed since it hasn't been used for more than a month. Summer officially commences this week according to some folks and daylight breaks around 5am now, waking me up on Father's Day, a Sunday, an 'off day'. I get out the door by 6am, hop on the tractor, and resume where I left off yesterday afternoon around 4pm chiseling (primary tillage) various fields that have been resting this season until now. Before chiseling, compost was spread for about 6 hours yesterday, invigorating fields that will accept our fall crops like broccoli, cauliflower, leeks, and celeriac. Prior to adding compost cover crops were mowed.
The ground hasn't been this dry since...October? So, we are already thinking/always thinking months ahead because ground can't just be made ready overnight, unless maybe one uses a rototiller, but we don't because we like to make things harder for ourselves. Or, perhaps, we like to think that by not using one we're preserving the integrity of the soil and allowing our farm to be more 'sustainable' by improving soil chemistry, biology, and physical properties by using 'reduced tillage' techniques. We also like to prepare soil for planting into in stages to allow weeds to germinate then be killed by subsequent passes with the tractor. A typical ready bed is a month in the making.
Back to food: additional spring crops will be on their way out of shares after this week and early summer crops will trickle into the pick up room. Romaine, kale, escarole, radicchio, and endive will be absent until the fall. Celery, fennel, zucchini (green and yellow), and cucumbers should arrive this week. Cabbage, scallions, and outdoor beets should be ready next week. A few weeks later we'll welcome fresh garlic, tomatoes, peppers, and eggplant.
Thanks for growing with us.
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June 17, 2018
A Few Newbies
Expected Harvest
By Derek McGeehan
Main Season Harvest #5 (Week A) should include garlic scapes, mini lettuces, romaine lettuce, kale, escarole, endive, radicchio, kohlrabi, scarlet turnips, hakurei turnips, zucchini (hopefully), cucumbers (hopefully), fennel, celery, strawberries, basil, parsley, dill, and cilantro. Some items will be a choice. U-pick should include peas, strawberries, and herbs.
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June 17, 2018
Workshifts for Week of 6/18/18
Other News
by Dana Hunting
Workshifts scheduled for this week:
  • Wednesday 6/20 10am-12noon
  • Friday 6/22 10am-12noon
  • Sunday 6/24 9-11am
Workshift sign-up instructions may be found here.
Workshifts typically meet under the large red maple just outside of the pick up room. Please wear appropriate clothes and footwear for working outside and bring your own gloves and water.
Thank you!
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June 17, 2018
Scallions, Scapes and Peas
How I Enjoyed My Harvest
By Linda Dansbury
Snow peas very ready for picking.
Greens are being intermingled with other tasty farm treats, including peas, scallions and garlic scapes. Here are a few things I did this week with my harvest - please share how you are using your harvest by emailing me at lindadansbury@comcast.net. Please put Anchor Run in subject line so I can find your email.
Scallions, green garlic, herbs, Hershberger flat iron steak - flat iron steak is a delicious cut but requires some attention. I found a recipe for marinating it for about 24 hours using chopped onions and garlic, so I used scallions and green garlic. The process was to coat meat with olive oil and salt and pepper both sides of meat. Thinly slice lemons and place a layer of lemon slices in bottom of a nonreactive baking dish. Place meat on top then top the meat with chopped scallions and scapes, ginger, and cilantro (you can use whatever herbs you like). Place a layer of thinly sliced lemons on top. Cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate for 24 hours - mine went about 12 hours. Grill till medium rare - it was delicious.
Peas, scallions, garlic scapes, mint and basil - made a pasta dish incorporating all of these ingredients. I often search for recipes and then improvise based on what I have on hand. In this case the recipe called for leeks and frozen english peas. So, I used scallions, garlic scapes and snow peas. I just adjusted cooking times for the veggies we have. As a note for all pasta dishes that include greens or veggies, I have found my taste is to prefer a much higher ratio of veggie to pasta than most recipes call for, so I typically add twice as many veggies as recipe indicates.
Beets - I roasted all my beets the other night - it is simple to do. Placed a few of same sized beets on foil, drizzle with a bit of olive oil and salt and closed up foil packet. Placed in 425 degree oven until beets are tender - time varies based on size of beets, but start checking at 45 minutes. Peel when cool enough to handle for easiest skin removal - I learned this is the hard way when I was too lazy to peel when they came out of oven. Now I have a pile of beets I will add to salads, or make into Beet Risotto with Beet Greens (using other greens we have).
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June 17, 2018
Greens and Strawberries
Member Ideas and Suggestions
By Linda Dansbury
It's been a good strawberry season so far!
I heard from 2 of our members this week, sharing how they are enjoying their harvest. Please share your thoughts/ideas on the harvest with the rest of the membership by emailing me at lindadansbury@comcast.net and please put Anchor Run in subject line. Thank you to Alice Maxfield and Lisa Miernicki - their comments and recipes are now part of our community!
Alice Maxfield sent me the following email and I am adding the recipe for the Creamy Lettuce Soup she sent to me as well. Thank you Alice!
"I like soups, particularly blended cream soups. I found a simple lettuce recipe last year and have used it a couple of times already this season. Even sharing a share three ways, with only two of us, we just can’t keep up otherwise. Especially because we have a small garden plot at home with lettuce and tomatoes.
This week I used the chard in a scrambled egg dish with a little cottage cheese and some chives. Kale I made into my usual kale quinoa craisin slivered almond salad. Boiled the beets and added balsamic vinegar for salads. Added spring mixed greens to morning smoothies. Ate the peas raw. Blanched and froze beet greens. Made lettuce soup with remaining greens and froze a quart leaving a quart for now. Added red and white radishes to every salad. My husband cooked thinly sliced kohlrabi with tofu.
Feeling virtuous for successfully using so much and then it was Monday yesterday and I started all over again!"
Lisa Miernicki sent me the following "I feel compelled to share this recipe with you. I found it by following the Chicken Chick. This recipe find was SO timely! I had to improvise by switching out fresh squeezed oranges for the lemons. And I used rice flour instead of corn starch. I think for this next batch I will get some new corn starch. Overall, the bars were a hit! I personally left off the glaze - I did not care for it."
The recipe for Fresh Strawberry Bars is now on this site. I am sure that raspberries and blackberries can also be used in this recipe.
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June 17, 2018
Interchangeable Alliums/Scapes
Other News
By Linda Dansbury
A late spring treat: Garlic Scapes.
Garlic and onions are the most common members of a large plant genus called allium (in the Amaryllidaceae family). The goal of Anchor Run is to provide its members with some type of allium each week of the season - a task that takes a lot of planning and expertise. A typical allium season for us looks something like this:
Weeks 1-2: chives and green garlic; weeks 3-6: garlic scapes; weeks 6-14: scallions; weeks 9-12: fresh garlic; weeks 11-14 fresh onions; weeks 14-26: semi-cured onions; weeks 17-26: leeks; weeks 16-26: cured garlic. Cured garlic doesn't require refrigeration but we recommend refrigerating everything else. Cured onions on the farm are passively cured in the field then put right into cold storage.
Why do I put you through all this reading? If a recipe calls for onions and you only have scallions, don't worry about it - use the scallions - just don't cook them for long or you will lose the flavor. I made a recipe calling for leeks this past week and I used my scallions and a bit of green garlic I still had. The same with garlic - don't run out and buy garlic - instead, use the scapes, just account for the fact that scapes will lose their flavor when cooked for long.
If you are a new member of the farm, you may be wondering how to use the garlic scapes. First of all, they store for at least 2-3 weeks in a plastic bag in the fridge. They can be used in place of garlic in most recipes, with the exception of long cooking ones like soups and stews - their flavor will be cooked out. I love using them raw in things like guacamole, bruschetta and salad dressings. I use them in stir fries, but add them at the end with the greens. On this site we have a few recipes for them including Garlic Scapes and White Bean Dip and Garlic Scape Pesto (yes, almost anything can be made into pesto). After receiving scapes for all these years, I learned a new way with scapes this year - grilling them! As I described recently in grilling the heads of romaine lettuce, do not walk away! Method is simple - place scapes in a bowl and drizzle a bit of olive oil over. Add a bit of salt and mix well. Place scapes on medium heat on grill for about a minute. Turn over and cook for another minute. That's it! They taste nutty and slightly garlic-y. Even better, grill along with scallions, then eat as a side dish or chop up and add to salads and/or sauteed snow peas. So, so tasty!!
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June 10, 2018
At Least Last Week Was Beautiful
Notes From The Field
By Derek McGeehan
Dry soil and hilled potatoes.
The fourth week of the Main Season CSA is here. We're right in the middle of the strawberry and pea harvest, one of the best times of the eating year. Strawberries had perfect growing conditions last week and their taste today (before the rain) was simply incredible. With good weather the berries should last another couple of weeks. Peas should continue for another 2-4 weeks. We're harvesting the first planting, snow peas, with two more plantings of snap peas each spaced two weeks apart to hopefully spread out the harvest as much as possible. As peas taper off snap beans will come in so there'll be a smooth legume transition. Following strawberries will be: raspberries, blackberries, watermelon, and cantaloupe.
The fortunately gorgeous weather last week was perfect for crops and farmers. Crops grew quickly under seven days of sun. Tomato plants added a literal inch of growth daily. Farmers spent more than the average amount of weekly work hours getting caught up on tasks as well as proceeding with the typical weekly and seasonal jobs. We progressed through the first round of tomato trellising, pruning all plants to one or two leading vines, clipping each one either to a wire supported by 7' t-posts or twine suspended from wires. Two thousand out of three thousand sweet potato slips were planted (one thousand were lost by UPS but will be planted this coming week). Ten-thousand feet of potatoes were hilled twice which will provide more room for the potatoes to grow. Many crops were transplanted including lettuce, dill, cilantro, watermelon, sunflowers, yellow wax beans, and scallions. The entire onion patch was weeded with help from multiple workshifts. We're already thinking about fall even though summer isn't here: we seeded cabbage and Brussels sprouts. Next week we seed broccoli and cauliflower.
Thank you mama nature for giving us a good week for good work.
One of the largest strawberries I've ever seen had to be devoured immediately.
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June 10, 2018
Monsoon Meals
Expected Harvest
By Derek McGeehan
Harvest #4 (Week B) should include strawberries, 'mini' lettuces, romaine lettuce, kale, endive, escarole, radicchio, garlic scapes, summer squash, Italian dandelion, Swiss chard, basil, dill, cilantro, parsley, hakurei turnips, scarlet queen turnips, and kohlrabi. Some items will be a choice. U-pick should include snow peas, strawberries, and perennial herbs.
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June 10, 2018
Workshifts for Week of 6/11/18
Other News
by Dana Hunting
Transplanting another round of sunflowers for the u-pick cut flower patch.
Workshifts scheduled for this week:
  • Tuesday 6/12 9-11am
  • Tuesday 6/12 6-8pm
  • Wednesday 6/13 10am-12noon
  • Wednesday 6/13 6-8pm
  • Friday 6/15 10am-12noon
  • Sunday 6/17 9-11am
Workshift sign-up instructions may be found here.
Workshifts typically meet under the large red maple just outside of the pick up room. Please wear appropriate clothes and footwear for working outside and bring your own gloves and water.
Thank you!
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June 10, 2018
Storing Herbs
Other News
By Linda Dansbury
We are receiving fresh cut herbs in the pick up room these days and when you get home, you may be wondering how to best store them. You may have also found that your basil has black spots on it when you take it out of the fridge 2 days after receiving it. Basil is very susceptible to cold temperatures. The best way to store it is to trim the stems and place in a glass of water and keep it on your kitchen counter (like cut flowers). Change the water at least every other day. Dill, cilantro and parsley will do well stored with a damp paper towel in a bag in the fridge or in a glass of water (Derek and Dana have had good storage simply putting these 3 in a plastic bag in fridge but consistently eat the herbs within a few days). Most perennial herbs you cut from the herb garden will do best in a glass of water on the counter.
Truth be told, whenever I pick herbs from my garden, including perennials such as thyme, rosemary and chives, I place whatever I don't use at that time into a glass of water on the counter. The other benefit of herbs being right where you are cooking is you think of using them more often and herbs are the healthiest way of adding flavor to your dishes!
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June 10, 2018
U-pick Tips
Other News
By Linda Dansbury
The u-pick pea patch is looking very healthy this year.
The U-Pick season has begun and I hope you are taking advantage of it. In all the years I have been fortunate to be an Anchor Run member (since the second year of its existence), the peas have never looked better - peas do not like hot temps, and especially don't like high temps followed by heavy downpours. The plants are lush, and filled with peas ready for the picking. Please use 2 hands when picking - hold the pea to be picked with one hand and the stem with the other and gently pull pea from plant. Trying to do it with one hand may result in breaking the stem or pulling it down from the trellis. After picking your allotment, put your peas in a plastic container for storage in the fridge. Leaving them in the u-pick container will result in wilted peas.
The strawberries are peaking, so get yours while you can - this is one of the most loved crops of the season, and even though Derek and Dana picked out varieties to try and spread the ripening over a period of several weeks, the berries didn't get the message. Like with the peas, use 2 hands to pick berries. Berries don't last long at my house - I keep them in the u-pick container to allow moisture to escape. They will start to "wilt" after a few days if left uncovered so if you won't be eating them right away, use a large plastic container, put a thin cloth or paper towels on the bottom to absorb any water, gently place berries in container and put the lid on it. Do not wash/rinse berries until right before eating them or you will have rotten berries (or skip this step altogether since they're completely organic).
Other tips:
Wear comfy, sturdy shoes, a large hat and sunglasses. Protect your skin with long sleeves, pants or wear sun screen. Bring your bags to the farm along with scissors/clippers. Be considerate of other members coming in behind you by picking only your allotment and being gentle with the crops.
Please bring back or reuse the U-pick containers each week.
Thank you and enjoy the harvest!
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June 10, 2018
Peas and Greens
How I Enjoyed My Harvest
By Linda Dansbury
Radicchio - good for digestion and good-looking.
When I first joined Anchor Run (many years ago), I was overwhelmed this time of year with all the greens. I couldn't figure out how to use them all. Now, I get them all out and throw a little of each in salads nearly every night; the variety boosts flavor, texture and nutrients. We add greens to soups and stews that don't even call for them. We use lettuce leaves and tender chard leaves for Asian chicken, pork and shrimp wraps. How do you use your harvest? Please let me know at lindadansbury@comcast.net
Peas, scallions, parsley - made a very simple saute to go with grilled chicken. Just melted a combo of butter and olive oil, tossed in a roughly chopped scallion and sauteed until a little tender. Added peas and sauteed for just 2 minutes - you want the peas to be crunchy. Removed from heat and squeezed a bit of lemon juice and added salt, pepper and chopped parsley. It was fast, simple and delicious.
Turnips, kohlrabi, green garlic, peas - Made the Radishes with Goat Cheese Dip I described in last week's newsletter but instead of chives, I used a bit of green garlic. We had it as a nutritious and delicious appetizer.
Beets, romaine lettuce, green garlic - Roasted beets, grilled romaine, and made a Citrus Caesar Vinaigrette. Typically we have a salad of either one or the other, but decided to add some sliced beets in as well and it was really yummy.
I hope you are enjoying the bountiful harvest.
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June 3, 2018
Onward
Notes From The Field
By Derek McGeehan

Soggy Field Two.
by Farmer Derek

A typical wet farm scene from the past few weeks is shown above. This is the summer nightshade patch including tomatoes, peppers, eggplant, okra, and sweet corn. We're righteously assuming the perpetually soggy ground will eventually dry out leaving happy plants in its wake. This field had been left fallow for almost 4 full seasons so we're anticipating robust growth and healthy crops. This field does seem to be subjected to a high water table so we'll see what does happen. Tomato plants that have been in the ground for almost 4 weeks are thriving fortunately.

We did manage to transplant a lot of crops this past week, pushing and pulling the transplanting wheels up and down thousands of feet of raised beds. We're so used to wet ground that we don't even think about using the tractor for this task anymore. Most of the time during the growing season we pull the water wheel transplanter with the tractor. It deposits water in holes made in the soil with 3 spiked-wheels that are fully adjustable based on row space needed for specific crops. In wet weather we pull it with human power, and skip the water addition part. It is a really good system and a really good work out.

Upcoming this week: trellis and prune tomatoes, transplant 3000 sweet potato slips plus other crops, cultivate, seed, weed, harvest, bed prep. Onward.


Transplanter spiked-wheels.
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June 3, 2018
Peas and Strawberries are Here!
Expected Harvest
By Derek McGeehan
Harvest #3 (Week A) should include strawberries, kale, romaine lettuce, mini lettuces, beets, scarlet queen turnips, kohlrabi, endive, escarole, chard, greens mix, Italian dandelion, radicchio, green garlic, scallions, basil, dill, cilantro, and parsley. Some items will be a choice. U-pick should include perennial herbs, snow peas, and strawberries.
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June 3, 2018
Great Greens!
How I Enjoyed My Harvest
By Linda Dansbury
by Linda Dansbury

Salads taste so much brighter with farm fresh greens, so we have eaten large salads usually adding a little bit of most of the greens. Derek tells me the next couple of weeks of harvests will include a lot of lettuces, chicories, and other greens so here are a couple of ideas for you. I welcome emails from members sharing how you enjoy your harvest - please email me at lindadansbury@comcast.net and please use Anchor Run in the subject line.
Romaine lettuce - the head of romaine we received was epic! A really delicious way to enjoy it is to put it on the grill briefly and then make it into a Caesar salad. Cut the head into quarters, leaving the core intact. Brush lightly with olive oil and place on grill on indirect heat. Do not walk away or it will burn. You just want to char it slightly. Remove from grill, chop into bite-sized pieces and dress with your favorite Caesar dressing.
Kohlrabi, turnips, green garlic, cilantro - made a saute/stir fry. Thinly sliced the kohlrabi and turnips and sauteed them, leaving them alone enough to create browned spots. I added the green garlic when I thought the veggies were about half cooked. When they were almost tender, I added the chopped greens to the pan and allowed them to wilt. I then drizzled a bit of sesame oil and salt and pepper. Removed from heat and put a generous amount of chopped cilantro on top.
Radishes, turnips, kohlrabi - added them to salads for added crunch. Also cut up and ate some along with my lunch each day.
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June 3, 2018
Kohlrabi and Turnips
Other News
By Linda Dansbury

Hannah was still smiling after transplanting beans and edamame (and winter squash, summer squash, cucumbers, lettuce, dandelion, basil, eggplant, okra, corn) during another soggy week. Camera person could have requested it.
The rainy, gloomy weather has slowed down some veggies, but others, including turnips and kohlrabi are thriving - so, what do you do with them? These 2 veggies are asked about by members as much as any we receive. Both are in the brassica family - the same as broccoli - and have the same high level of vitamins and antioxidants.
They keep best if the tops are removed and stored separate from the bottom. See last week's newsletter for things you can do with the greens - don't throw them away! Both turnips and kohlrabi store well in the fridge.
Both the turnips and kohlrabi are yummy raw and cooked. I often use the turnips instead of radishes in salads and both are great as part of a crudite platter with your favorite dip. A favorite of mine, Radishes with Goat Cheese Dip is on this site.
Grate kohlrabi into your salads or use for cole slaw. Try the Kohlrabi Slaw recipe for something different.
So, how about cooking? Veggies in this family become mild and almost nutty tasting when cooked. Both veggies are tasty when simply sauteed until tender in a little butter or oil - add fresh herbs, salt and pepper near the end of cooking. Both are also great when used as ingredients in stir fries, or cut into cubes and added to soups and stews. One very tasty option for turnips is the Asian Turnips with Miso on this site. It demonstrates how to use the veggie and greens in one delicious dish.
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June 3, 2018
Workshifts for Week of 6/4/18
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By Dana Hunting

Weeknight and weekend workshift leader Jeff Bence (right), farm member since 2004!
Workshifts scheduled for this week:
  • Tuesday 6/5 9-11am
  • Tuesday 6/5 6-8pm
  • Wednesday 6/6 10am-12noon
  • Wednesday 6/6 6-8pm
  • Friday 6/8 10am-12noon
  • Sunday 6/10 9-11am
Workshift sign-up instructions may be found here.
Workshifts typically meet under the large red maple just outside of the pick up room. Please wear appropriate clothes and footwear for working outside and bring your own gloves and water.
Thank you!
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June 3, 2018
Now What?! Recap
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By Gia Yaccarino
I will be honest – Anchor Run CSA never ceases to amaze me! I shared with one member at the workshop that when I originally joined Anchor Run CSA, I was solely focused on the “A” part of CSA. The “C” part snuck up on me and had me hooked! Reflecting on today’s workshop, I was again focused on the “A” part – how to store, how to prep, recipes… Again the “C” part snuck up on me! The workshop included first year members and seasoned members and everyone shared and offered their input. There was such an awesome exchange of ideas and advice. Absolutely amazing! We talked about ways to store our herbs – placing them in a glass of water on your counter is great option! And once the Basil starts coming in – remember to keep it out of the fridge.
Of course, the workshop would not be complete without food! I shared BBQ Zucchini Chips and Cinnamon Apple Chips when we briefly spoke about using a dehydrator. I also made Radish and Turnip Lasagna – as in no noodles, the sliced and baked radish and turnips acted as the noodles! Members who tried and enjoyed the Kale Stem Pesto remarked “So instead of putting the center rib in the compost pile!” And I also shared a new family favorite – Kohlrabi in a Peanut Teriyaki sauce. I promise the recipes will come in a future newsletter.
Overall, I hoped to try to encourage members to think outside the box regarding using their share. I will confess that until maybe 4 or 5 years ago, whenever Bok Choy was part of our share, the only thought I had was “make rice for stir fry”. Now I use Bok Choy in so many ways – using the leaves for a wrap, having the stem with peanut butter, or using both leaf and stem in a Mexican Casserole!
Dandelion Greens and what to do with them also had a little talk – my favorite options are salads and Dandelion Green Pesto. If the Dandelion Greens are too bitter for your taste – try massaging them! Blanching also helps tame the bitterness.
Blanching greens to freeze and save for later was also discussed. I don’t mean to diss the turnip greens – but with all the yummy produce we are getting in our share, they are not on the top of my list of what I want to eat. But I am so grateful in the winter that I had blanched them, squeezed out all the water and froze the little ball in a Ziploc bag or a mason jar!
Thank you to everyone who attended – I had a fabulous time and I hope you did too!
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June 3, 2018
Strawberry Storage
Other News
By Linda Dansbury
The strawberry harvest commences today. All of this rainy weather means the strawberries may be wet when you pick/receive them, making them very susceptible to rotting. There is nothing more depressing than having your berries rot before you get a chance to eat them. If they are wet when you get them home, gently lay them out on a towel and allow to dry before putting them in the fridge - I do keep mine in the u-pick containers because it allows them to breathe.
Never wash berries and then put into the fridge - they will rot quickly.
Enjoy!
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