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News and Notes
from the Field

Posts Filtered by Month - August 2019 |
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August 25, 2019
End of Summertime for Some
Notes From The Field
by Farmer Derek

Chisel plowing after spreading compost on ground where early potatoes were grown in preparation for a cover crop.
It's the end of August. Summer ends for meteorologists and those going back to school. Summer on the farm is waning but won't end here until we decide it does, or the Fall Equinox rolls around, or tomatoes, peppers, and eggplant officially wrap up, whichever is first. We are moving away from summer staples and welcoming crops more associated with fall. A nice quality of eating seasonally is the continued change in meals as new produce ripens according to the local climate. Greens, potatoes, and winter squash and soon leeks, celeriac, sweet potatoes, broccoli, and cauliflower will grace our tables.

Lightning striking the ocean as a storm rolled off the coast south of us (at a safe distance).
Your CSA farmers took a break and skedaddled from the farm for a very long weekend at the North Carolina shore with extended family. It was our first legit break since perhaps February. I've been working 7 days a week since early May and needed something hopefully rejuvenating. Getting off the farm is a great way for me to spend quality time with the family. When we're at the farm I can't take a full mental and physical break during the main growing season due to the plethora of physical farm tasks to do and organize as well as maintaining membership administration. Abstaining from screen time during this outing also helped temporarily sever ties to work (I highly recommend disconnecting once in a while). But now we're back and are totally excited to finish out the season on a positive note, working our hardest to grow great organic produce for the next 11 weeks of the Main Season.

Atlantic Ghost Crab.
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August 25, 2019
Welcome Changes
Expected Harvest
by Farmer Dana

Second round of tomatoes are starting to ripen!
Harvest #16 (Week B) should include winter squash, potatoes, lettuce, tomatoes, onions, scallions, garlic, sweet peppers, hot peppers, okra, eggplant, Italian dandelion, Swiss chard, kale, and rosemary. U-pick should include edamame, snap beans, tomatoes (cherry, plum, grape), flowers, and herbs.

Another pleasing image of winter squash curing in the greenhouse. Hoping for better curing and storage success this season.
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August 25, 2019
Workshifts for Week of 8/26/19
Other News
by Farmer Derek

A local bumblebee collecting nectar and pollen from one of our sunflowers.
Workshifts scheduled for this week:
  • Tuesday (8/27) 9-11am
  • Wednesday (8/28) 9-11am
  • Friday (8/30) 9-11am
  • Sunday (9/1) 8-10am
Workshift sign-up instructions may be found here. Calendar is here. Member Work Guidelines are here.
If it is actively raining during the time of the shift it will be canceled.
We're into the final quarter of the workshift season! Work opportunities will last for another 1.5 months or so but frequency will decrease as we approach and are in Fall/Autumn.
If you still need to complete your pledged farm labor hours for your share discount please sign up soon. Alternatively, if you'd rather pay the full amount for your farm share that is fine, just send us a check to cover the workshift hours.
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August 18, 2019
Where's The Wet Stuff?
Notes From The Field
by Farmer Derek

Buckwheat exploration.
An August of old is unfolding, a return of what feels and seems like a normal weather pattern for this time of year. Spotty showers, mostly missing us, more heat and plenty of humidity, perhaps a last gasp of peak summer. We continue to will ourselves away from resorting to irrigating, but once the crops appear to be thirsty and suffering slightly we'll probably give them a drink. If we do wind up irrigating this season, at least it's now when our total footprint is smaller than at peak, though there are probably more bare ground crops now and we would have to manually add drip tape to each bed rather than tractor applied drip tape when laying the plastic mulch that assists many of the summer species. Whereas most of this year and last a 20% chance of rain would result in a 100% inundation, now we're faced with the opposite. The rain does miss us, and we do miss it. Part of me wants to irrigate so I can at least forget about the weather momentarily and quit refreshing the forecast tab every 5 minutes when I'm near a computer, but on the other hand relying on Mother Nature imparts a perception of dependence on outside forces, which I guess is humbling and/or nurturing.
Either way, we march on. Last week we hauled in whatever winter squash was in good condition and hope to cure and store it temporarily in the greenhouse where it should heal and sweeten. We also continued to dig and retrieve potatoes. At this point we've harvested almost 50% of the crop and the yield looks better than our average, probably due to regular rainfall when the spuds were forming and bulking up, but hopefully also due to increased soil health and fertility.
Some summer crops have passed their peak and some are truly waning. Zucchini, cucumbers, eggplant, and basil have slowed down and may disappear in a week or two. Field and heirloom tomatoes peaked and then quickly dropped but very soon our hoop tunnel crop will be yielding aplenty. Tomatoes should be in shares for a while yet. Greens like chard and kale are about to return to the pick up room. Late summer kale is a treat and for some reason almost always looks and tastes great even though it grows during the heat of summer. As of now our fall brassicas look outstanding, growing in a field that left a 3-year fallow period before last season. As long as the weather doesn't return to a too-wet phase broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, etc should be bountiful this fall.
The 2/10th of an inch of rain we did receive last week at least got some cover crops going as well as direct seeded arugula, hakurei turnips, watermelon radishes, and purple daikons. The fields where we sowed buckwheat and daikon a few weeks ago are in peak buckwheat bloom now. Pollinators and kids are thrilled.
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August 18, 2019
Still Feeling Like Summer
Expected Harvest
by Farmer Dana

1st Place at the Middletown Grange Fair for this Market Basket! Taking a break from a share photo this week due to moving a literal ton of potatoes into storage.
Harvest #15 (Week A) should include cantaloupe, onions, scallions, lettuce, sweet peppers, hot peppers, okra, Italian dandelion, cilantro, dill, carrots, cucumbers, eggplant, garlic, tomatoes, kale, and Swiss chard. U-pick should include tomatoes (cherry, grape, plum), edamame, snap beans, husk cherries, tomatillos, flowers, blackberries, and herbs.
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August 18, 2019
Workshifts for Week of 8/18/19
Other News
by Farmer Derek
We're taking a break from workshifts this week due to heat and vacation. The schedule will be back to normal next week.
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August 18, 2019
Returning to Greens
Other News
By Linda Dansbury

Buckwheat sown on July 17th is a good place to play.
I don't know about you, but I have been missing greens from the farm. We might be receiving kale and chard this coming week, so I am happy!
For me, the combination of ingredients late in the summer calls for summer veggies stews - there are a lot of recipes on this site, so search for any crop you want to feature, such as eggplant, peppers or okra and recipes will pop up. Although most will not have greens in the ingredient list, I normally do add any greens I have to the stew when it is nearly cooked through, adding even more flavor and nutrition to the mix.
Or just make up your own mixture of whatever you have: chop up the veggies you want to use up in the order they will take to cook. I normally start with the onions and peppers - I tend to add the garlic a little later so it doesn't burn. Add in eggplant and continue cooking - adding liquid if needed - chopped tomatoes can serve as the liquid. Add the okra or zucchini and cook till "al dente" - you don't want these to be too soggy. Finally add chopped greens, followed by chopped fresh herbs. Delicious as a side dish, but also a great topping for chicken or sausage, or to keep it vegetarian, add white beans or chick peas to bump up the protein.
Enjoy your veggies!
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August 18, 2019
Salsas and More!
How I Enjoyed My Harvest
By Linda Dansbury

Winter squash curing in the greenhouse.
It was a busy week of cooking and eating farm fresh goodness. Please share how you enjoyed your harvest by emailing me at lindadansbury@comcast.net and please put Anchor Run in the subject line.
Ground cherries, tomatoes, sweet and hot peppers, scallions, cilantro - made the Ground Cherry Salsa recipe from this site. As I have said before, time consuming to make, but well worth it.
Tomatoes, red onions, sweet and hot peppers, herbs, local peaches, local sweet corn - made a Peach and Tomato salsa and used it over Wild for Salmon fish and then with tortilla chips. Very delicious.
Tomatoes, garlic, basil - made the Uncooked Tomato Sauce recipe on this site - so easy and delicious.
Eggplant, basil - made Eggplant Lasagna on this site. I like this version because you just bake the sliced eggplant rather than frying it. You make little stacks, so serving it is also easy.
Okra - one of the simplest ways to enjoy okra is to slice it and then cook it in a non stick skillet with a little olive oil added. Place the slices so the cut sides are down in the pan. Turn over when the first side turns brown and cook till second side is brown. Add a little salt and enjoy - they taste a bit nutty when cooked this way and are not slimy at all.
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August 11, 2019
Alignment
Notes From The Field
by Farmer Derek

Common buckeye butterflies, honey bees, and other insects gathering nectar and pollen from the mountain mint patch in the herb garden.
We lucked out once again with some precipitation when the farm was ready and waiting, the sky providing almost an inch of light rain in a two-day period. Cover crop and carrot seeds needed another soaking to help stir that inner life force into waking and sprouting. Carrot seeds require a bit more TLC to get going compared to other crops we direct seed. Constant moisture supposedly helps them germinate but we're currently content with our dependency on rainfall which appears to be right on schedule this coming Tuesday. The carrots are just beginning to sprout and push through the soil to begin photosynthesizing the sun's rays into delectable carbohydrates while they pull in that satisfying carbon dioxide from the earth's atmosphere and in turn give us a bit more oxygen to breathe. In a couple of weeks we'll cull their competitors with stirrup hoes and hopefully it will be a successful fall carrot patch.
Speaking of success, the stars aligned this year and for whatever reason(s) we've produced more cantaloupe than we ever have. Which is definitely a good thing, but it also means we've got to make sure we harvest it right on time and store it perfectly until we can distribute it to you in the pick up room. This year we grew two new varieties, one round and one oblong. They're both potential varieties to grow next year.
Last week we underwent our annual Certified Organic inspection. It's a pretty straightforward affair for us since we've been managing the farm organically for 11 years, but we still need to provide documentation for all of our inputs/purchases to confirm they are organic approved, as well as records for crop yields, health, rotation, etc. The certification isn't cheap, but we still think it provides the only true proof across the food market landscape of non-toxic farming and processing practices. Because we're a CSA-only farm and all of our members pick up and harvest here there's probably more-than-enough proof in our members' observation. Having a third-party certifier and acquiring the USDA Organic seal does provide a universally recognized symbol, hopefully of integrity and good and clean food, giving you more reason to love your farm and trust our growing practices.
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August 11, 2019
'Lope Invasion
Expected Harvest
by Farmer Dana
Harvest #14 (Week B) should include cantaloupe, tomatoes, onions, garlic, eggplant, cucumbers, zucchini (limited), sweet peppers, scallions, carrots, lettuce, basil, dill, cilantro, Italian dandelion, okra, and hot peppers. U-pick should include edamame, snap beans, husk cherries, tomatillos, tomatoes (plum, cherry, grape), blackberries, flowers, and herbs.
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August 11, 2019
Fun, Healthy Veggies
How I Enjoyed My Harvest
By Linda Dansbury

Okra flower.
I had a lot of fun preparing and eating all of the delicious veggies this past week. Eggplant, zucchini, and more. Please send me how you are enjoying your harvest by emailing me at lindadansbury@comcast.net and please put Anchor Run in subject line so I can find your email.
Zucchini, scallions, herbs, Hershberger Farm bacon - made a quiche, using shredded zucchini as the crust. Just shred about 3 cups of zucchini and place in bowl. Add a beaten egg, salt and pepper and press the mixture evenly into a pie pan - deep dish works best. Bake the "crust" at 400 degrees for about 30 minutes. When it is set and browned around the edges, remove from oven. Reduce oven temp to 350, and proceed with your favorite quiche recipe. This makes a great dinner hot, and is good the next day at room temperature.
Cucumbers - it is a banner year for cucs. I have been enjoying them as a snack at lunchtime and while I am making dinner. Also made cucumber salads a few times. If you want to know what to do with all of the cucumbers and like pickles but are not into canning, try the Narrow Bridge Farm Refrigerator Pickles on this site. They are easy and delicious.
Eggplant, scallions, mint, basil, garlic, hot pepper, dandelion greens - made a nice sized batch of the Thai-style Grilled Eggplant salad (on this site). The first use was as a side dish with some grilled chicken. I then had plenty left to make it into a main course. Browned some ground pork from Hershberger Farm with garlic and ginger, then added chopped up dandelion greens, and finally added the eggplant salad. Topped with a bunch of chopped cilantro - it was delicious.
Tomatoes, garlic, scallions, ground cherries, hot peppers, basil, parsley - made the Ground Cherry Salsa - all I can say is Yum!
Zucchini, sweet pepper, scallions - made a batch of burgers called Garden Veggie Burgers - basically use a pound of whatever meat you want (it calls for ground turkey but works for whatever you want); add a cup of oats, 1/4 cup ketchup, 3/4 cup shredded zucchini, and chopped onion (I used scallions since we have them), 1/2 cup finely chopped sweet pepper - you can add a hot pepper if you want. Add salt and pepper to taste, mix well, form into burgers, grill and enjoy.
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August 11, 2019
Salsa Anyone?
Member Ideas and Suggestions
By Linda Dansbury
Fellow member Tamela sent me a recipe from Food Network for Roasted Tomatillo Salsa. It is similar to what is on this site and is a great reminder of a delicious way to use your tomatillos, garlic, cilantro and hot peppers. Make a lot at a time and freeze for later in the year, such as when it is cold and snowy - it will bring back memories of a beautiful day like today!
Ingredients:
2 pounds fresh tomatillos, husked and well rinsed
2 fresh jalapeno peppers
1 medium white onion, quartered
4 tablespoons olive oil
4 cloves garlic, unpeeled
1/2 cup loosely packed fresh cilantro leaves
Juice of 1/2 lime
Kosher salt
Directions:
Preheat the oven to 450 degrees F.
Add the tomatillos to a baking sheet along with the jalapenos and onion wedges. Toss with 1 tablespoon of the olive oil and roast about 7 minutes. Turn the vegetables, add the garlic and roast until everything is slightly softened and charred, another 7 to 8 minutes. Set aside to cool.
Peel the garlic and remove the stems and seeds from the jalapenos. Add the roasted vegetables to the bowl of a food processor and pulse until still slightly chunky but well combined. Add the cilantro, lime juice and 1 teaspoon salt and pulse until incorporated. With the processor running, stream in the remaining 3 tablespoons olive oil until the salsa is slightly runny but not smooth. At this point you can season with additional salt if desired.
Serve with chips or as a salsa for tacos and burritos.
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August 11, 2019
Upcoming Events: Potlucks and a Farm Tour
Other News
by Farmer Dana

More misty morning majestic sunflowers.
  • Wednesday, August 14th, 6-8pm at Anchor Run Farm: Bucks County Foodshed Alliance and Buy Fresh Buy LocalĀ® Bucks County announce the 2019 series of popular farm evenings that introduce consumers to the local small-scale producers who put the freshest foods onto our tables via direct sales, community-supported agriculture operations (CSAs), farmers markets, farm stands, and other venues. The farm evenings include a potluck dinner and a tour of the farm.
  • Saturday, August 17th, 5-8pm: Potluck in the pavilion. Meet and mingle with your farmers and other CSA members. Bring a dish to share, your own place settings, and a beverage of your choice. The meal should be followed by a small fire and perhaps even live music. S'mores anyone?
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August 11, 2019
Workshifts for Week of 8/12/19
Other News
by Farmer Derek

Cantaloupe taste test and nourishment before hauling a thousand pounds back to the barn.
Workshifts scheduled for this week:
  • Wednesday (8/14) 9-11am
  • Friday (8/16) 9-11am
  • Sunday (8/18) 8-10am
Workshift sign-up instructions may be found here. Calendar is here.
If it is actively raining during the time of the shift it will be canceled.
We're definitely into the final third of the workshift season. Work opportunities will lessen over the next couple of months so if you still need to complete your pledged farm labor hours for your share discount please sign up soon!
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August 4, 2019
Abundance
Notes From The Field
by Farmer Derek

Fall brassicas looking good on a summer evening.
Harvests are particularly abundant right now, and I hope you are enjoying the bounty. Share weight is exceeding the 20 pound mark and you may need some serious muscle carrying the goodies away from the barn and fields. The high yield of some crops is the result of adequate rainfall, ideal soil fertility, and a slight increase in the number of plants grown, which typically follows a growing season with disastrous weather, like we enjoyed in 2018. We tend to overcompensate when yields are disappointing by growing more later, and when we grow more and have almost perfect growing conditions (like this year), crops are happy, thrive, and yield abundantly.
Not that everything has worked out perfectly this season. Peas drastically underperformed and unfortunately the heirloom tomatoes acquired some kind of blight earlier than normal. In contrast the field tomato plants were the healthiest and tallest I've ever seen and now that they're fruiting the yields seem to be following suit. Additionally the 2nd planting of tomatoes inside the hoop tunnel is also thriving and should keep tomatoes on our tables well into September. The first planting of watermelon was lost during excessive rainfall but the 2nd planting has done well and the two cantaloupe plantings appear to have succeeded. Zucchini/summer squash plantings 2 and 3 aren't yielding as expected but cucumbers are rolling in. Overall a balance is achieved.
We're continuing to maintain our no-irrigation-no-problem vigilance as we wait out this current semi-dry spell with faith that it will rain again very soon. We also think that it would be silly to add water to increase yields when we don't need an uptick in yield. That said, we won't risk losing crops to a lack of moisture, but we have confidence in our current weather patterns to bring us ample rainfall frequently enough. Sure seems that way at least, based on this year and last. We also have the added benefit during dry weather that our fields face north, don't drain particularly well to begin with, and have a high amount of organic matter which retains moisture.
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August 4, 2019
Heavy Harvests
Expected Harvest
by Farmer Dana
Harvest #13 (Week A) should include cantaloupe, cucumbers, zucchini, carrots, scallions, fresh garlic, lettuce, sweet peppers, eggplant, hot peppers, okra, Italian dandelion, tomatoes, basil, cilantro, and dill. U-pick should include snap beans, edamame, blackberries, husk cherries, tomatillos, tomatoes (plum, cherry, grape), flowers, and herbs.
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August 4, 2019
Peak U Pick - including Edamame
Other News
By Linda Dansbury

Sunflower cyclops on a misty morning.
July and August represent peak U Pick time. You can collect your U Pick allotment Mon-Sun 8am-8pm of your pick up week. Consult the U Pick board in the pick up room for current quantities. Please reuse the harvest containers and if you borrow the Farm's scissors, please return them after each use, so others can use them too.
A note about the blackberries - for the sweetest berries, pick the ones that are completely black and come off the plant with just a slight tug. If you have to really pull them, they are not fully ripe. Look toward the bottom of the plants and behind leaves too - they are plentiful!
Edamame will be available this week for the first time and will last about a month. Look toward the bottom of the plants for the plumpest beans. When you get them home, place them in a plastic bag in the fridge until ready to cook. To cook, bring a large pot of heavily salted water to a rolling boil and then add the edamame pods. Watch closely, because they have a tendency to boil over. Start testing for done-ness at 9 minutes. They are typically cooked to perfection by 11 minutes. Drain the beans and they are ready to eat! Place in a bowl and salt again - adding paprika, a flavored salt or another favorite spice is also yummy. Cooked beans will keep in the fridge for a few days, or freezer for a couple months. I do find that if I freeze them to use later, I prefer them to have already been shelled so I can use them in dishes that call for edamame, lima beans or fava beans.
There are several nice recipes using edamame on this site, including Soybean Hummus, Edamame Lo Mein, Edamame Succotash with Shrimp, and Edamame and Carrot Salad with Rice Vinegar.
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August 4, 2019
Upcoming Events
Other News
by Farmer Dana

What we're pretty sure is a pickerel frog, it's species has been seen hopping around the farm noticeably more this year.
  • Wednesday, August 7th, 6-8pm: Bucks County Foodshed Alliance and Buy Fresh Buy LocalĀ® Bucks County announce the 2019 series of popular farm evenings that introduce consumers to the local small-scale producers who put the freshest foods onto our tables via direct sales, community-supported agriculture operations (CSAs), farmers markets, farm stands, and other venues. The farm evenings include a potluck dinner and a tour of the farm.
  • Saturday, August 17th, 5-8pm: Potluck in the pavilion. Meet and mingle with your farmers and other CSA members. Bring a dish to share, your own place settings, and a beverage of your choice. The meal should be followed by a small fire and perhaps even live music. S'mores anyone?
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August 4, 2019
Workshifts for Week of 8/4/19
Other News
by Farmer Derek

Exhausted after this mid-Sunday haul of cantaloupe.
Workshifts scheduled for this week:
  • Wednesday (8/7) 9-11am
  • Friday (8/9) 9-11am
  • Sunday (8/11) 8-10am (probably harvesting potatoes!)
Workshift sign-up instructions may be found here. Calendar is here.
If it is actively raining during the time of the shift it will be canceled.
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August 4, 2019
An Eggplant Kind of Summer
How I Enjoyed My Harvest
By Linda Dansbury

A newly discovered treat in the riparian habitat above the upper pond: swamp rose mallow.
Farmer Derek told me the eggplants are abundant this summer, so you have to prepare to cook and enjoy them each week. Grilling your entire take each week all at once can make it easier and relaxing to enjoy them. See below for what I did to enjoy my harvest - if you have something you love to do with eggplant or other farm veggies, please share by sending to me at lindadansbury@comcast.net and please put Anchor Run in the subject line.
Eggplant, sweet peppers, hot peppers, tomato, basil - made the Grilled Eggplant and Pepper Salad. I grilled 2 weeks worth of eggplants at the same time and used the remainder to make Eggplant Spread. The Eggplant Spread and traditional tomato bruschetta made a delicious summer CSA dinner!
Husk cherries, peppers, tomatoes, hot peppers, scallions - made the Ground Cherry Salsa. Yum!!
Cherry tomatoes, basil - if you have never done "burst tomatoes" before, try it - it works with store bought tomatoes because it helps concentrate the sugars, but it tastes unbelievable when using locally grown cherry tomatoes. Simply heat a bit of olive oil in a pan, and add just a couple slivers of garlic. Add the tomatoes and cook over medium or medium-low heat until the tomatoes start to break down a bit - about 10 minutes. Add a bit of salt and pepper and basil or parsley (if desired). Recipes for these often call for adding balsamic vinegar at the end, but these are so sweet, I love them the way they are. Serve along your desired protein or even over pasta.
Zucchini, tomatoes, garlic, pesto - made zoodles with tomatoes and pesto as a side dish. We are loving this dish right now.
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